Yogurt – full fat or low fat

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This topic contains 9 replies, has 5 voices, and was last updated by  Rabelais 4 years, 9 months ago.

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  • #118791

    Angelica123
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    Does it matter either way – low fat or full fat yogurt, as long as it has good quality bacteria in it? The diet I’m following says low fat, but I don’t want to loose too much weight, and the yogurt is one way of achieving this.

    #118793

    eskimo_pup
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    Angelica123;57312 wrote: Does it matter either way – low fat or full fat yogurt, as long as it has good quality bacteria in it? The diet I’m following says low fat, but I don’t want to loose too much weight, and the yogurt is one way of achieving this.

    The priority is a good probiotic yoghurt that is low in sugar, look at the nutrition guide on the tub, it should say ‘sugars as carbs’ or something like that, that should be as low as possible. Authentic greek yoghurt is the best, supermarket own brand ‘greek yohurt’ i find is much higher in sugar.

    Even then I wouldn’t go nuts because although it was on Able’s diet Raster only recommends goats yoghurt [greek yoghurt is not goats, milk] at a push, limit consumption to sensible levels and use things like avocado, olive oil, coconut flour etc. to keep your weight up.

    I have the same problem with weight, a lot of people do on this kind of diet. I drink full fat kefir but again the key is moderation because it’s a powerful probiotic.

    #118794

    Angelica123
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    Does the fat content have any bearing on whether good or bad on anti candida diet? For example, does the fat turn into sugar or something along those lines?

    #118803

    TheXtremisT
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    Fat is not candida’s primary food source, but it can use it, just like most other foods on this diet that contain fats, or even protein. But it loves sugars. If we are going to deprive the fungus of its fuel, it will try other less efficient processes, but to that effect there is no way you should be worried about consuming fats, because you need to FEED YOURSELF.
    You’d have nothing else other than veggies or lean protein. Just don’t over consume unhealthy fats, which on the strict diet aren’t a worry to begin with.

    The main thing to consider is that when a manufacturer claims “low fat”, they reduce the fat content, but compensate by adding more sugar.
    When they claim “low sugar”, they add fat. Sneaky sneaky.

    As long as you find a good yoghurt (greek yoghurt is best because it is mostly fats and protein), with a low sugar content (under 5% is ideal) and plenty of beneficial bacteria, you can’t go far wrong.

    #118804

    raster
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    Whats most important is the animal the yogurt comes from. Most people have problems with cow derived milk and this is why its important. You very likely have a dairy intolerance like the most of us.

    If you do get cow’s yogurt, the most important thing is how much fat content it has and how the yogurt was made. I would aim for whole fat yogurt vs. fat free yogurt, you need all of the nutrition you can get on this diet. I’ve experimented with a variety of yogurts, and the best for me from cow is organic bulgarian yogurt if you can get it. Also european cows are way healthier than american cows(they use brown vs. black and white cows) and so if you live in europe, there isn’t as much of a concern what kind of yogurt you get.

    -raster

    #118812

    Rabelais
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    Last Saturday, I was driving through the country. I saw lots of cows of course. There were many black-and-white cows, and there were many brown cows.

    This morning, I was in the train to commute to my work. Looking out of the window, I again saw the usual abundance of cows. Again, I saw brown cows in some meadow, black-and-white cows in other meadows, and a mixture of both kinds in yet other meadows.

    So I can testify that all kinds of cows are prevalent here. Also, note that there’s not just one kind of black-and-white cow, and one kind of brown cows. Cows come in all kinds of varieties, there’s so much more to a cow’s race than just the color.

    Meanwhile, even though there’s no such thing as “the” black-and-white cow and “the” brown cow, I do wonder why black-and-white cows would be less healthy than brown cows. Could you explain?

    #118818

    raster
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    So to explain the type of cows and dairy intolerance relationship, you don’t really have to look further than europe or africa. In africa they have no black and white cows. They also do not have any rates of dairy intolerance, or its very low when compared to america. In europe its the same thing, very low rates of dairy intolerance.

    -raster

    #118820

    Angelica123
    Member
    Topics: 4
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    http://www.mensjournal.com/health-fitness/nutrition/trouble-drinking-milk-try-a-new-cow-breed-20140314

    Yes – there is quite a bit of info on this on the web. Under previous circumstances Jersey milk was my fave – very creamy yummmmm!! I’ve not got a sweet tooth so much, but I could drink/eat gallons of cream.

    #118956

    Rabelais
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    raster;57339 wrote: In africa they have no black and white cows.

    I’m puzzled by this statement.

    In the meantime, I’ve been paying extra attention to the cows in my country, and I’ve seen brown-and-white cows. I’ve also discovered that there is not just one kind of black-and-white cow, but lots of different kinds. With brown cows, there are even more different varieties. Probably, there are different kinds of brown-and-white cows too.

    When there are so many different types of cow, how can you say that “the” black-and-white cow produces “bad” milk? Which of all species of black-and-white cows are you talking about?

    And how can you say that all types of brown cow produce “good” milk, when there are so many different types of brown cow?

    raster;57339 wrote: [In Africa, t]hey also do not have any rates of dairy intolerance, or its very low when compared to america.

    This is not true.

    Most dairy intolerance is lactose intolerance. Lactose is present in cow’s milk (regardless of the cow’s skin colour). The majority of the world’s population can only digest lactose up to the age of about three years. After that, the capability to digest lactose disappears, because the body stops producing the required enzyme (which is called lactase).

    During our evolution, a mutation occurred (several times, in fact), which caused our body to not stop producing lactase at the age of about three, but to continue producing lactase during our entire lives. Those who carried that mutation, and their descendants, can digest lactose (and, therefore, cow’s milk) indefinitely

    This mutation occurred mainly in people of caucasian descent. In Africa, the mutation is almost completely absent. This means that almost everyone in Africa is lactose-intolerant. The majority of Europeans, in contrast, is lactose-tolerant.

    This might actually be the source of your statement that dairy intolerance is almost absent in Africa. In reality, dairy intolerance is the norm there, over 99% of Africans are dairy intolerant. For this very reason, dairy is not sold in Africa. After all, who would buy products that are known to cause problems?

    In Europe, most people can handle dairy. But some cannot. Since most people can handle dairy, and dairy is both tasty and healthy, dairy products are widely available. Therefore, those few who have a dairy problem are very much exposed to dairy, and the problem shows.

    #119684

    Rabelais
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    Topics: 3
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    Raster, six weeks have passed without any reaction from you about my observations.

    Would you please be so kind to share your opinion with us?

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