Veggy vs Non-Organic

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This topic contains 6 replies, has 4 voices, and was last updated by  Katy Gillett 7 years, 8 months ago.

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  • #63310

    Katy Gillett
    Member
    Topics: 47
    Replies: 137

    If I can’t get my hands on (or just can’t afford) to eat organic foods all the time, am I better off doing the anti-candida diet the veggy way? But without legumes, beans, lentils etc. how am I supposed to get enough protein etc. I know nuts and all but it doesn’t sound very wholesome. What does anyone else think?

    #63312

    Able900
    Spectator
    Topics: 92
    Replies: 4811

    Hello, Katy.

    I know this story all too well. I’ve been on the Candida diet (still phase 1) since last year, and I’ve fought this protein problem all along. As far as what I can and can’t eat goes; I can’t eat nuts, any kind, not at all. For the first time in several months, the other day I tried a few almonds which I shelled myself and soaked in water all night. I still received a reaction from them that was strong enough that I won’t be trying that again. I had started adding some dried beans a few weeks ago, but this week I received a fairly strong reaction from those, so I’ve stopped them again, and when I start back it will be gradually, and even slower and less than before. I also have to be very careful about the meat I eat. I seem to receive a reaction from all red meats, no matter what it is. I purchase organic chicken breasts because I’ve found that I can’t find chicken anywhere else that doesn’t have extra salt added for preservation, and I receive a reaction from it when that’s done. I was also eating a small bowl of organic Greek yogurt with coconut cream mixed in it, but I finally started feeling reactions to that as well.

    Unless I have the organic chicken on hand, eggs are my one life saver to be honest. I can only purchase the organic chicken in my area on certain Saturdays at a local Farmer’s Market, and it “extremely” expensive, so sometimes I run out and have to depend on the eggs alone.

    So my advice to you is to eat eggs and a lot of them. Of course, I purchase only organic eggs which are available both at the farmer’s market and several supermarkets in my area.

    Good luck, Katy, and know that if you stick with this you will see a difference in time. I was seeing a difference until I started adding all of those foods I mentioned. Just take it easy when you start adding other foods.

    Thanks for your post, Able

    #63318

    Hope
    Member
    Topics: 22
    Replies: 187

    Are you able to eat plain yogurt? It’s allowed on the diet and provides a decent amount of protein. 2 eggs, a cup of yogurt, and maybe some quinoa each day (it’s a complete protein all by itself!) should help you get what you need, at least until you get to the point of reintroducing legumes. Hope this helps! Oh, and if you eat the yogurt w/ a whole grain like buckwheat or millet, it will provide a complete protein, too. You probably already knew that, though 🙂

    #63438

    Katy Gillett
    Member
    Topics: 47
    Replies: 137

    Thanks guys, that’s all very helpful… I have reintroduced some organic meat and have been having some trouble with beef but chicken is fine, and I’ve been eating fish which seems ok for now too. Up until last week I could tolerate natural yoghurt as well but if I eat it too often then I react.

    The diet is driving me a bit crazy at the moment I have to admit! What is the deal with wheat as well? Can we eat it if we don’t react or is it better to cut it out altogether?

    #63444

    Hope
    Member
    Topics: 22
    Replies: 187

    No, you want to avoid wheat and other gluten-containing grans completely. They break down very quickly into sugars and feed the yeast. Do you live in a small town or is there a chance that there might be health food store near you? If there is, there are alternative flours and grains that can be used, and some are very tasty. I just made a savory griddle bread from amaranth, onion, and garlic and froze the extras for later days when I need a quick grain option. It can be done, but you do have to take some time to learn about the new foods available. That’s where so many on this board can be helpful and encuraging! 🙂 You can do it! I keep telling myself that I’m showing love to my baby by taking care of my body. I know it will make the postpartum period SO much easier if I can nip this now.

    #63544

    DanRead
    Member
    Topics: 2
    Replies: 5

    I’m a vegetarian and have just looked (should have done this sooner) at the ingredients list on my Quorm sausages and apparently the microprotein is part of the “fungi family”. Should I be eating this? It also apparently contains traces of gluten, so I suppose that is out then? Do I just eat eggs, as suggested?

    #63581

    Katy Gillett
    Member
    Topics: 47
    Replies: 137

    Yeah quorn sausages are a no go unfortunately. Eggs, nuts, quinoa and yoghurt are good protein sources for now.

    I don’t think quorn is very good for you in general so it’s probably best to stay away anyway.

    If you come across any great candida friendly veggie recipes do share!

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