TMI alert: Where is your candida overgrowth located?

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This topic contains 13 replies, has 5 voices, and was last updated by  Vegan Catlady 4 years, 11 months ago.

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  • #117639

    Vegan Catlady
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    Who knew that candida overgrowth can be found in the ears and eyes?

    I DIDNT…not at first!

    Knowing that candida overgrowth can be anywhere or limited to a few areas is new info to a lot of people.

    Where did you notice your candida overgrowth, has it evolved into something more complicated, or were you able to limit its spreading?

    Do you have a weird symptom that you havent read anyone else talk about yet?

    I figured you might bring something up that another person may need to hear, especially if they are feeling alone in their suffering….or maybe they are just confused on what overgrowth is, and when it could be something else entirely.
    <3

    #117640

    raster
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    Candida exists on our skin, in our mouths, our entire digestive tract, and most notably…your mucousal membranes. Then it exists in a variety of organs as well…

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mucous_membrane

    -raster

    #117644

    Vegan Catlady
    Member
    Topics: 34
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    raster;56161 wrote: Candida exists on our skin, in our mouths, our entire digestive tract, and most notably…your mucousal membranes. Then it exists in a variety of organs as well…

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mucous_membrane

    -raster

    Many of us have seen the dozens of websites that tell us we cant possibly have candida WHERE we have it,unless we have HIV or Hepatitis. The local teaching hospital told me this, and my old MD.
    Simply googling where you think you have your candida will yield these sites.
    I googles candida in the esophagus. It gave me nightmares,lol.

    Speaking from experiences might help others to realize that its more common than they think, and more common than the internet has told them,especially if they are looking at traditional-medicine websites,too. They are the worst.

    I know my candida overgrowth is in my sinuses,eyes,and esophagus.

    The reason it got so bad in my throat/esophagus is because an ENT told me I had GERD, and my candida went untreated for almost 2 years. thats a long time to have a sore throat,lol.

    #117649

    raster
    Participant
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    Sore throat is also a common thyroid symptom…

    #117654

    Tdog333
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    Topics: 25
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    I think it’s safe to say that if you have candida externally you’re gonna have it internally too. Chances are if you have it anywhere visible, it’s also overgrown in your intestines.

    #117657

    Vegan Catlady
    Member
    Topics: 34
    Replies: 626

    From what I have read,almost everyone with candida overgrowth has thyroid symptoms that come and go.

    My thyroid symptoms were bad at first, and are now non-existent.

    #117658

    Vegan Catlady
    Member
    Topics: 34
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    Tdog333;56175 wrote: I think it’s safe to say that if you have candida externally you’re gonna have it internally too. Chances are if you have it anywhere visible, it’s also overgrown in your intestines.

    I wish I knew this years ago.
    I believe I have relatives that have since passed away that would have benefited by this information.

    #117687

    dvjorge
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    Topics: 283
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    The headquarter is in the Cecum. This is the most difficult part to treat of the complete infestation. Metabolites produced by candida colonies in the Cecum influence the immune system causing cell-mediated suppression. Candida albicans cells living in other mucous membranes begin to produce symptoms since there isn’t immune control. I believe I still have candida colonies in the Cecum. Very hard to treat orally and very difficult rectally. High enemas and retention antifungal enemas that reaches the Cecum are probably the only hope. Resolving the intestinal overgrowth fixes the rest of the problems most of the time.

    Candida albicans and bacterial microbiota interactions in the cecum during recolonization following broad-spectrum antibiotic therapy.
    Mason KL1, Erb Downward JR, Mason KD, Falkowski NR, Eaton KA, Kao JY, Young VB, Huffnagle GB.
    Author information
    Abstract
    Candida albicans is a normal member of the gastrointestinal (GI) tract microbiota of healthy humans, but during host immunosuppression or alterations in the bacterial microbiota, C. albicans can disseminate and cause life-threatening illness. The bacterial microbiome of the GI tract, including lactic acid bacteria (LAB), plays a vital role in preventing fungal invasion. However, little is known about the role of C. albicans in shaping the bacterial microbiota during antibiotic recovery. We investigated the fungal burdens in the GI tracts of germfree mice and mice with a disturbed microbiome to demonstrate the role of the microbiota in preventing C. albicans colonization. Histological analysis demonstrated that colonization with C. albicans during antibiotic treatment does not trigger overt inflammation in the murine cecum. Bacterial diversity is reduced long term following cefoperazone treatment, but the presence of C. albicans during antibiotic recovery promoted the recovery of bacterial diversity. Cefoperazone diminishes Bacteroidetes populations long term in the ceca of mice, but the presence of C. albicans during cefoperazone recovery promoted Bacteroidetes population recovery. However, the presence of C. albicans resulted in a long-term reduction in Lactobacillus spp. and promoted Enterococcus faecalis populations. Previous studies have focused on the ability of bacteria to alter C. albicans; this study addresses the ability of C. albicans to alter the bacterial microbiota during nonpathogenic colonization.

    Cecal colonization and systemic spread of Candida albicans in mice treated with antibiotics and dexamethasone.
    Bendel CM1, Wiesner SM, Garni RM, Cebelinski E, Wells CL.
    Author information
    Abstract
    Infections with Candida albicans have become a significant problem among very low birth weight infants in the neonatal intensive care unit. Risk factors are multiple and include administration of antibiotics and glucocorticoids, such as dexamethasone. Experiments were designed to study the combined effect of oral broad-spectrum antibiotics and parenteral dexamethasone on cecal colonization and extraintestinal dissemination of C. albicans in separate groups of mice that were orally inoculated with one of four C. albicans strains that were either wild-type INT1/INT1 or had one or more disruptions of the INT1 gene. Intestinal colonization was monitored by quantitative culture of the mouse cecum, and extraintestinal invasion was monitored by quantitative culture of the draining mesenteric lymph nodes and kidneys. At sacrifice, the average numbers of cecal C. albicans differed from 7.7 log(10)/g to 6.7 log(10)/g (p < 0.01) in mice orally inoculated with C. albicans containing two functional copies of INT1 and no functional copies of INT1, respectively. The incidence of extraintestinal dissemination to mesenteric lymph nodes and kidneys correspondingly varied from 57 to 13% (p < 0.01) and 83 to 4% (p < 0.01) in mice inoculated with these two C. albicans strains. Mice orally inoculated with C. albicans containing one functional copy of INT1 had intermediate levels of cecal colonization and extraintestinal dissemination. Thus, cecal colonization and extraintestinal dissemination of C. albicans was facilitated in antibiotic-treated mice given dexamethasone. In addition, the presence of two functional copies of the INT1 gene was associated with the greatest levels of cecal colonization and extraintestinal dissemination of C. albicans.

    #117703

    TheChosenOne
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    Topics: 34
    Replies: 410

    I had cramps, bloating and diarrhea for years. The common explanation was ‘allergies’ or ‘Your bowels are stressed, I’ll prescribe you something’. Other (external) symptoms are oral thrush and athletes foot.
    I don’t have candida in the small intestine. My guess is somewhere near the large intestine or the cecum, like dvjorge.

    #117704

    Vegan Catlady
    Member
    Topics: 34
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    TheChosenOne;56224 wrote: I had cramps, bloating and diarrhea for years. The common explanation was ‘allergies’ or ‘Your bowels are stressed, I’ll prescribe you something’. Other (external) symptoms are oral thrush and athletes foot.
    I don’t have candida in the small intestine. My guess is somewhere near the large intestine or the cecum, like dvjorge.

    Do you think this is where resistant-starches would do some good?

    #117707

    Tdog333
    Member
    Topics: 25
    Replies: 245

    Yes RS2 will work well for candida overgrowth. It’s important to cut down the candida as best as you can before starting, and make sure you take the RS with some SBO’s.

    I started a protocol I made up a couple of days ago, it will involve resistant starch. I’m hoping this will be the end of my candida for good.

    #117709

    Vegan Catlady
    Member
    Topics: 34
    Replies: 626

    Tdog333;56228 wrote: Yes RS2 will work well for candida overgrowth. It’s important to cut down the candida as best as you can before starting, and make sure you take the RS with some SBO’s.

    I started a protocol I made up a couple of days ago, it will involve resistant starch. I’m hoping this will be the end of my candida for good.

    I have been researching resistant starches and following patterns in the posts of people on other forums. Im terrible interested.
    What Jorge said here gave me goosebumps, because I was only recently just trying to figure out how to get everything thats working on my throat into my large intestine, where I think (or know now) it hides out in numbers.

    Looking forward to hearing how RS effects your journey.

    #117744

    TheChosenOne
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    Topics: 34
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    Vegan Catlady;56225 wrote: Do you think this is where resistant-starches would do some good?

    Before doing the strict candida diet, I did a less strict diet which included resistant starches. I don’t remember if it did much good, but I do remember that it didn’t cause any setbacks.
    I’m gonna include resistant starches in the next weeks to see if it has benefits.

    #117749

    Vegan Catlady
    Member
    Topics: 34
    Replies: 626

    TheChosenOne;56265 wrote:

    Do you think this is where resistant-starches would do some good?

    Before doing the strict candida diet, I did a less strict diet which included resistant starches. I don’t remember if it did much good, but I do remember that it didn’t cause any setbacks.
    I’m gonna include resistant starches in the next weeks to see if it has benefits.

    I look forward to hearing how that plays-out for you. Please post about it?

    I want to experiment with this,too.
    If I did my homework, it wont be necessary for me to purchase “resistant starch”, I could potentially just cook potatoes or rice and use them the next day after refrigeration.
    I tried this with potatoes early-on in my diagnosis and didnt have a reaction either so I might try that.

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