Sugar in Water Kefir

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This topic contains 18 replies, has 8 voices, and was last updated by  Rabelais 4 years ago.

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  • #81632

    jules
    Member
    Topics: 4
    Replies: 25

    I made my first batch of water kefir, which I think gave me a slight reaction from the sugary taste. Is it safe to drink on strict anti-candida diet? Does fermenting longer than 48 hours get rid of the sugar?

    #81650

    Able900
    Spectator
    Topics: 92
    Replies: 4811

    jules wrote: I made my first batch of water kefir, which I think gave me a slight reaction from the sugary taste. Is it safe to drink on strict anti-candida diet? Does fermenting longer than 48 hours get rid of the sugar?

    I would think that, after 48 hours and providing the temperature of the room was correct, the sugar should be fairly well absorbed by the bacteria.
    For me, it seems the best temperature for fermenting kefir is from 74 – 76 degrees, but maybe others have found other temps to work fine as well. Anyway, if your room wasn’t warm enough for the full 48 hours, I suppose it’s possible that the kefir may not be fully fermented even after 48 hours.

    What was the reaction you experienced?

    Able

    #81655

    Javizy
    Member
    Topics: 20
    Replies: 945

    What do you mean by first batch? If you just got the grains, you need to do 2-3 24-hour fermentations (or more as necessary) to allow the grains to “wake up” and begin growing at a decent rate. Pour the kefir away until the grains are ready because it’ll contain too much sugar. You’ll know when they’re ready because they’ll grow by 90-200% and some may float to the top. Other signs are carbonation, change in colour and, of course, sour taste.

    If you’re not getting good growth, you need to add a source of minerals. I use a tsp of blackstrap molasses and 1/8 tsp of pure baking soda. You may need to check your water too. Tap water contains chlorine and other junk that won’t allow the bacteria to grow. I use bottled mineral water. Everything you need to know is on Dom’s Kefir Site.

    If you get a reaction no matter what (remember it could be die-off), just eat the grains. The kefir itself has a number of benefits, but the grains contain plenty of (if not more) probiotics, and since water grains grow so rapidly, you get enough to justify the effort/expense of the fermentation process. I recommend eating them regardless. You’ll have so many anyway, so you’ll need to work out something to do with them!

    By the way, if you chose water kefir due to lactose intolerance, read this article. It may be overcome by the very thing you’re avoiding! If casein is the problem, then continue with water kefir.

    #81666

    jules
    Member
    Topics: 4
    Replies: 25

    Able900 wrote:
    I would think that, after 48 hours and providing the temperature of the room was correct, the sugar should be fairly well absorbed by the bacteria.
    For me, it seems the best temperature for fermenting kefir is from 74 – 76 degrees, but maybe others have found other temps to work fine as well. Anyway, if your room wasn’t warm enough for the full 48 hours, I suppose it’s possible that the kefir may not be fully fermented even after 48 hours.

    What was the reaction you experienced?

    Able

    I experienced a bit of mental grogginess/fogginess and a slight headache along with a body temperature rise. The room temperature is a bit hard to control, so I will try fermenting for 72 hours in case the kefir was not fully fermented. Right now, I feel like I’m making a lot of progress by eliminating sugars from my diet. If worse comes to worse, I’ll have to forgo the kefir route, because it will probably set me back. It tastes like grape juice!

    #81668

    jules
    Member
    Topics: 4
    Replies: 25

    Javizy wrote: What do you mean by first batch? If you just got the grains, you need to do 2-3 24-hour fermentations (or more as necessary) to allow the grains to “wake up” and begin growing at a decent rate. Pour the kefir away until the grains are ready because it’ll contain too much sugar. You’ll know when they’re ready because they’ll grow by 90-200% and some may float to the top. Other signs are carbonation, change in colour and, of course, sour taste.

    If you’re not getting good growth, you need to add a source of minerals. I use a tsp of blackstrap molasses and 1/8 tsp of pure baking soda. You may need to check your water too. Tap water contains chlorine and other junk that won’t allow the bacteria to grow. I use bottled mineral water. Everything you need to know is on Dom’s Kefir Site.

    If you get a reaction no matter what (remember it could be die-off), just eat the grains. The kefir itself has a number of benefits, but the grains contain plenty of (if not more) probiotics, and since water grains grow so rapidly, you get enough to justify the effort/expense of the fermentation process. I recommend eating them regardless. You’ll have so many anyway, so you’ll need to work out something to do with them!

    Thanks for the detailed information.

    Yes, it was first time making kefir. I will try your suggestions to make the kefir taste more “sour”. I noticed in some youtube videos that there was a bubbling effect due to fermentation but I saw none of that in my batch and the amount of kefir grains stayed pretty much the same.

    By the way, if you chose water kefir due to lactose intolerance, read this article. It may be overcome by the very thing you’re avoiding! If casein is the problem, then continue with water kefir.

    I chose water kefir because I thought it might easier to digest than milk kefir. I was drinking commercial milk kefir (sugarless) before making my first batch of water kefir but I noticed a bit of reaction to that also, so I limited my intake. I guess I’ll have to stick with probiotics if the water kefir doesn’t work out.

    #81670

    Able900
    Spectator
    Topics: 92
    Replies: 4811

    I experienced a bit of mental grogginess/fogginess and a slight headache along with a body temperature rise.

    That’s a perfect description of die-off symptoms, which probably means that the kefir destroyed enough of the Candida to cause toxins to release in you body which in turn would have caused the symptoms you described. The temperature rise is the body’s natural defense against the toxins.

    Are you taking precautions against the toxins? I’m talking about Molybdenum Amino Acid Chelate, Candidate from Native Remedies, milk thistle, and saunas as well as soaking in a hot tub of water for 20 minutes. All of these will help to lessen the die-off effects. If you take the Molybdenum at least and have a bit of soaking in the tub, then if you have symptoms you’ll at least know it’s from Candida and probably not die-off because you’ll be protecting yourself from this.

    I’ll have to forgo the kefir route, because it will probably set me back.

    You need to lose that frame of mind now. Kefir WILL NOT set you back once you get it right, and in fact maybe you’ve already gotten it right considering the symptoms you experienced. Try it again, because it’s doubtful that you’ll ever cure your infestation without kefir in your regimen as it’s the single most important supplement on the entire protocol. The diet is nothing without it because it’s impossible for the diet to cure the infestation alone, even with strong antifungals it won’t happen.

    Able

    #81672

    jules
    Member
    Topics: 4
    Replies: 25

    Able900 wrote:

    I experienced a bit of mental grogginess/fogginess and a slight headache along with a body temperature rise.

    That’s a perfect description of die-off symptoms, which probably means that the kefir destroyed enough of the Candida to cause toxins to release in you body which in turn would have caused the symptoms you described. The temperature rise is the body’s natural defense against the toxins.

    Are you taking precautions against the toxins? I’m talking about Molybdenum Amino Acid Chelate, Candidate from Native Remedies, milk thistle, and saunas as well as soaking in a hot tub of water for 20 minutes. All of these will help to lessen the die-off effects. If you take the Molybdenum at least and have a bit of soaking in the tub, then if you have symptoms you’ll at least know it’s from Candida and probably not die-off because you’ll be protecting yourself from this.

    I’ll have to forgo the kefir route, because it will probably set me back.

    You need to lose that frame of mind now. Kefir WILL NOT set you back once you get it right, and in fact maybe you’ve already gotten it right considering the symptoms you experienced. Try it again, because it’s doubtful that you’ll ever cure your infestation without kefir in your regimen as it’s the single most important supplement on the entire protocol. The diet is nothing without it because it’s impossible for the diet to cure the infestation alone, even with strong antifungals it won’t happen.

    Able

    I’ll keep your advice in mind. At first I thought it might have been die off, but I’m not 100% sure, since I experience similar reactions when I eat sugary fruit or carbs. Also, my die off reactions are usually different and I experience them when I take antifungals. I know there is die-off when my hands start itching like crazy like I’m having an allergic reaction. On another note, I did notice that the kefir has a settling effect on my stomach.

    #81675

    Javizy
    Member
    Topics: 20
    Replies: 945

    jules wrote: Yes, it was first time making kefir. I will try your suggestions to make the kefir taste more “sour”. I noticed in some youtube videos that there was a bubbling effect due to fermentation but I saw none of that in my batch and the amount of kefir grains stayed pretty much the same.

    I recommend reading the link I gave you. There’s an FAQ on there and a lot of general information. I think you’ll find it more informative than the YouTube stuff. He doesn’t recommend 3-day fermentations, for example, since you risk starving the grains.

    If your grains aren’t growing at least 90%, I wouldn’t drink the kefir. Mine took maybe a week to get to that stage, and now (2 weeks or so later) they grow like crazy. Right now I have 6 tbsp worth floating at the top of my jar and about 12 tbsp worth at the bottom. I put 6 tbsp in two days ago.

    Mine doesn’t fizz unless I make it with grape juice (using spare grains). Apparently the fizz corresponds to the alcohol content (< 1% at most), so it's not a bad thing if it's flat. The grape juice one tastes a lot like rosé, by the way, but without the harshness of the alcohol. It's good for a treat, and there seems to be a lot of growth during ripening. I forgot to mention that ripening is a second fermentation you do after straining. It further reduces sugar content and increases the CFUs. I never drink mine after straining because it still has some sweetness. After another 24-hours, it turns sour. It takes a bit of trial and error, but I agree with Able that it’s worth seeing it through. It’s easy and cost-effective when you know what to do.

    #81695

    jules
    Member
    Topics: 4
    Replies: 25

    Javizy wrote:

    Yes, it was first time making kefir. I will try your suggestions to make the kefir taste more “sour”. I noticed in some youtube videos that there was a bubbling effect due to fermentation but I saw none of that in my batch and the amount of kefir grains stayed pretty much the same.

    I recommend reading the link I gave you. There’s an FAQ on there and a lot of general information. I think you’ll find it more informative than the YouTube stuff. He doesn’t recommend 3-day fermentations, for example, since you risk starving the grains.

    If your grains aren’t growing at least 90%, I wouldn’t drink the kefir. Mine took maybe a week to get to that stage, and now (2 weeks or so later) they grow like crazy. Right now I have 6 tbsp worth floating at the top of my jar and about 12 tbsp worth at the bottom. I put 6 tbsp in two days ago.

    Thanks again for your valuable input. I probably overreacted because I’m paranoid of incorporating any kind of sugar at this stage. Once I eliminated seemingly harmless fruits like strawberries and kiwis, I felt I made more progress. I usually put the fruits in my greek yogurt/kefir in the mornings. It took a lot discipline on my part to stop doing that and just eat it plain. I see it’s more of trial and error to achieve the right blend of kefir. It doesn’t help that I have absolutely zero cooking skills. Hehe.

    I never drink mine after straining because it still has some sweetness. After another 24-hours, it turns sour. It takes a bit of trial and error, but I agree with Able that it’s worth seeing it through. It’s easy and cost-effective when you know what to do.

    So after straining the grains, you wait another 24 hours before drinking? That’s good to know.

    #81736

    West11
    Member
    Topics: 5
    Replies: 26

    Since milk sounds like a definite no when making kefir? can you use coconut water?

    #81837

    jules
    Member
    Topics: 4
    Replies: 25

    I’m happy to report that my second batch was a success. For my first batch, the grains were probably damaged in transit and did not ferment properly. Hence, the overly sweet taste. I fermented my second batch for the same 48 hours and the taste is totally different. There’s a real acidity and tartness now with an underlying sweetness that I can barely detect. Plus, I’ve noticed the size of the grains got bigger and the number probably increased by more 20%!

    I want to thank everyone for their expert advice.

    #81872

    Javizy
    Member
    Topics: 20
    Replies: 945

    West11 wrote: Since milk sounds like a definite no when making kefir? can you use coconut water?

    You can, but I’m not sure how long they’d survive. Although, there’s nothing wrong with milk as long as you can tolerate it. Even if you can’t, kefir may help you develop tolerance by passing on lactose-digesting genes to your indigenous gut flora. All you have to do is consistently drink small amounts until this happens. I’ve come round to thinking dairy kefir is the best option since it contains fat soluble vitamins, minerals and even antioxidants. I’m going to try the approach I just mentioned, but continue with water kefir for a source of grains to eat, and occasional grape juice kefir (゚д゚)

    jules wrote: I’m happy to report that my second batch was a success. For my first batch, the grains were probably damaged in transit and did not ferment properly. Hence, the overly sweet taste. I fermented my second batch for the same 48 hours and the taste is totally different. There’s a real acidity and tartness now with an underlying sweetness that I can barely detect. Plus, I’ve noticed the size of the grains got bigger and the number probably increased by more 20%!

    I want to thank everyone for their expert advice.

    Glad to hear it’s going well. You should find that they continue to grow faster and faster. I’m actually struggling even to eat all of them at the moment. As this happens, the kefir should get even more sour (a good thing).

    #83328

    Clare_
    Member
    Topics: 12
    Replies: 134

    Does anyone drink Kombucha?
    If it were fermeted long enough (and decaf), would it be OK to drink?

    #171036

    surya2089
    Participant
    Topics: 0
    Replies: 3

    hi

    i want to know if add sugar in kefir,will cause any problem ,i dont want to take sugar in kefir.

    #171037

    raster
    Participant
    Topics: 104
    Replies: 6838

    The kefir should consume the sugar if you ferment it long enough but the problem with kefir is that eventually it will benefit both the good and bad guys in your gut.  So I would only consume kefir for a shorter period of time like 1-3 months or so.

    -raster

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