Streptocooccus agalactiae gp B and alpha haemolytic Streptococcus

Home The Candida Forum Candida Questions Streptocooccus agalactiae gp B and alpha haemolytic Streptococcus

This topic contains 3 replies, has 3 voices, and was last updated by  raster 4 years, 8 months ago.

Viewing 4 posts - 1 through 4 (of 4 total)
  • Author
    Posts
  • #119717

    emzie89
    Member
    Topics: 14
    Replies: 31

    Does anyone know what this means exactly? Just got my stool test back that had these listed as additional bacteria, both as non pathogens. Also had no growth of lacto, and no yeast or parasites seen.

    #119719

    raster
    Participant
    Topics: 104
    Replies: 6838

    The strept species relate to strept throat which is another type of gut flora imbalance. Strept throat symptoms can be severe such as sore throat and feeling ill.

    I recommend candia5 test for best candida test. Not all stool tests can be conclusive.

    -raster

    #119720

    allstars8
    Member
    Topics: 4
    Replies: 8

    I am confused. Does this mean i have strep? Is this a bad bacteria that needs to be taken care of? What does the non pathogen mean next to it?

    #119723

    raster
    Participant
    Topics: 104
    Replies: 6838

    So according to wikipedia alpha haemolytic Streptococcus is related to:

    S. pyogenes, also known as Group A Streptococcus (GAS), is the causative agent in a wide range of Group A streptococcal infections. These infections may be non-invasive or invasive. The non-invasive infections tend to be more common and less severe. The most common of these infections include streptococcal pharyngitis (strep throat) and impetigo. Scarlet fever is also a non-invasive infection, but has not been as common in recent years.

    The invasive infections caused by Group A β-hemolytic streptococcus tend to be more severe and less common. This occurs when the bacterium is able to infect areas where it is not usually found, such as the blood and the organs. The diseases that may be caused as a result of this include streptococcal toxic shock syndrome (STSS), necrotizing fasciitis (NF), pneumonia, and bacteremia.

    Additional complications may be caused by GAS, namely acute rheumatic fever and acute glomerulonephritis. Rheumatic fever, a disease that affects the joints, kidneys, and heart valves, is a consequence of untreated strep A infection caused not by the bacterium itself. Rheumatic fever is caused by the antibodies created by the immune system to fight off the infection cross-reacting with other proteins in the body. This “cross-reaction” causes the body to essentially attack itself and leads to the damage above. Globally, GAS has been estimated to cause more than 500,000 deaths every year, making it one of the world’s leading pathogens. Group A Streptococcus infection is generally diagnosed with a Rapid Strep Test or by culture.

    “S. agalactiae is a member of the gastrointestinal normal flora in some humans and can spread to secondary sites – genitourinary tract of women 20-30%.”

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Streptococcus

    This is why I recommend doing a stool test because most people have co-infections. I basically look at strept as being another type of parasite. The only western way to treat it is via antibiotics, but alternative medicine likely uses antifungals and homeopathics to treat it as well as addressing digestive health.

    If you have white stuff on your tonsils then you likely have strept throat. I’ve had it many times when I was younger and took every single antibiotic on the market. From my experience, it only gets stronger as you give it antibiotics. The strong parts survive and then repopulate.

    -raster

Viewing 4 posts - 1 through 4 (of 4 total)

The topic ‘Streptocooccus agalactiae gp B and alpha haemolytic Streptococcus’ is closed to new replies.