So what about "in between" foods?

Home The Candida Forum Candida Advice So what about "in between" foods?

This topic contains 7 replies, has 2 voices, and was last updated by  sarah 8 years, 3 months ago.

Viewing 8 posts - 1 through 8 (of 8 total)
  • Author
    Posts
  • #62758

    debthebee
    Member
    Topics: 4
    Replies: 24

    I was reading the “foods to eat” and “foods to avoid” but there are a lot of things missed out on these lists which makes me wonder if we are still allowed them. I understand the “foods to eat” will be things that will help fight off the candida and the “foods to avoid” will feed it but it does make me curious about foods we are allowed to eat.

    For example, we should eat yoghurt because of the probiotics in it, but what about milk? Ok I realise we should limit dairy but is this because it feeds the candida or that some people are extra sensitive to it? I don’t have a lot of trouble with nasal congestion so dairy doesn’t bother me that much.

    Also things like soba noodles, coconut milk and chickpeas are not in the “foods to eat” list but are mentioned in the recipes for stage one so I find it a little confusing. And if we are allowed coconut milk, then is it ok to eat fresh coconut?

    #62761

    sarah
    Member
    Topics: 1
    Replies: 24

    Some of it varies from one person to the next. It helps to read food labels to know the nutritional content of various foods which can help clarify.

    Milk contains a lot of natural sugar, which can feed candida, so it’s recommended to avoid it until the final stage of the diet. Some people do well to reduce their overall dairy intake long term.

    Chickpeas are a bean/legume and my understanding is they can be added back in Stage 2. I am actually cooking a batch right now! 🙂 Going to make hummus.

    I’m not positive, but I believe fresh coconut is okay. Fresh coconut does have a higher sugar content than coconut oil and milk though so proceed with caution and see what affect it has on you.

    What are the ingredients in soba noodles? That should tell you when they can be added.

    #62762

    debthebee
    Member
    Topics: 4
    Replies: 24

    I’ve been eating yoghurt and I’ve been ok. Not sure if milk and yoghurt are the same with how much sugar they contain though. The foods to eat says you can have yoghurt this so I’m assuming it will help fight the candida.

    As for the chickpeas and soba noodles, the reason I mention them is that they are in the recipes on this website for all stages. So this seems to mean we can eat them in stage 1 unless that is a mistake so it’s a bit confusing.

    #62765

    sarah
    Member
    Topics: 1
    Replies: 24

    Yogurt has less sugar than non-cultured milk, as the bacteria in the yogurt metabolize much of the lactose. It still has some, but notably less than regular milk. And, it also provides beneficial (probiotic) bacteria that are worthwhile to the fight against candida. Regular milk does not.

    I suspect the recipe(s) that say chickpeas in Stage 1 are a mistake. Chickpeas are specifically listed among the “foods to reintroduce” in Stage 2: http://www.thecandidadiet.com/foods-to-reintroduce.htm

    But I also Googled soba noodles, and read that they are made from buckwheat which is non-glutinous and on the “foods to eat” list for Stage 1.

    I hope this helps!

    #62774

    debthebee
    Member
    Topics: 4
    Replies: 24

    Yes that’s very helpful, thanks Sarah :). You sound like a pro!

    I couldn’t find any soba noodles in my supermarket, but I found some Thai noodles that are under the brand name “King Soba” so I thought they might be ok. They don’t contain buckwheat, but they are gluten free and contain organic rice flour. Do you think that would be an ok substitute?

    #62776

    sarah
    Member
    Topics: 1
    Replies: 24

    You’re welcome! Honestly I’m pretty new to this myself, but I read up on candida for months before beginning the diet to try to get a good understanding of it all.

    I’ve been sticking to brown rice flour and avoiding white rice flour, personally. The fiber in whole grains really does help, both to keep your blood sugar steadier and also to provide the cleansing effect fiber offers. I’m avoiding refined flours for now and will add them back in moderate amounts in Stage 3. If you do decide to use noodles made from white rice flour, I definitely suggest keeping your portions small and paying attention to how your body responds.

    #62777

    debthebee
    Member
    Topics: 4
    Replies: 24

    Yeah unfortunately it doesn’t say whether it’s white rice flour or brown, but I guess I sort of assumed that if it was organic it would be brown. The foods to eat says you can eat brown or wild rice…I’m not sure what wild rice is though. Could that be considered organic rice?

    I hope it’s ok though…it doesn’t contain any gluten but I’ll see how I get on.

    #62778

    sarah
    Member
    Topics: 1
    Replies: 24

    Generally speaking, if it doesn’t specify that it’s whole grain/ brown rice, then it’s white rice.

    Wild rice technically isn’t rice; it’s the seed of a certain grass. The grains are long (maybe twice the length of rice), slender, and black or dark brown.

Viewing 8 posts - 1 through 8 (of 8 total)

The topic ‘So what about "in between" foods?’ is closed to new replies.