Seborrheic Dermatitis

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  • #121016

    _valeree
    Member
    Topics: 5
    Replies: 5

    I’m pretty sure I have seborrheic dermatitis. I started a candida cleanse about 2 weeks ago and all of a sudden I have this flaky and itchy scalp. Is this a die-off symptom?

    Thanks!

    #121029

    Danny33
    Member
    Topics: 25
    Replies: 362

    Val,

    Seborrheic dermatitis used to be one of my worst symptoms.

    Abstract
    Seborrheic dermatitis is a superficial fungal disease of the skin, occurring in areas rich in sebaceous glands. It is thought that an association exists between Malassezia yeasts and seborrheic dermatitis. This may, in part, be due to an abnormal or inflammatory immune response to these yeasts. The azoles represent the largest class of antifungals used in the treatment of this disease to date. In addition to their antifungal properties, some azoles, including bifonazole, itraconazole, and ketoconazole, have demonstrated anti-inflammatory activity, which may be beneficial in alleviating symptoms. Other topical antifungal agents, such as the allylamines (terbinafine), benzylamines (butenafine), hydroxypyridones (ciclopirox), and immunomodulators (pimecrolimus and tacrolimus), have also been effective. In addition, recent studies have revealed that tea tree oil (Melaleuca oil), honey, and cinnamic acid have antifungal activity against Malassezia species, which may be of benefit in the treatment of seborrheic dermatitis. In cases where seborrheic dermatitis is widespread, the use of an oral therapy, such as ketoconazole, itraconazole, and terbinafine, may be preferred. Essentially, antifungal therapy reduces the number of yeasts on the skin, leading to an improvement in seborrheic dermatitis. With a wide availability of preparations, including creams, shampoos, and oral formulations, antifungal agents are safe and effective in the treatment of seborrheic dermatitis.

    I have been successfully treating my seborrheic dermatitis using the below anti-fungal soap.
    Candida Freedom – Anti-fungal soap

    I use this on my face and scalp every morning. The idea is to reduce the topical Malassezia yeasts on your face and scalp and reduce inflammation (e.g. Fish oil) in the body. The soap I noted worked way better then the ketoconazole cream prescribed by my doctor.

    Good luck.

    -D

    #121034

    _valeree
    Member
    Topics: 5
    Replies: 5

    D,

    Thank you so much for your recommendation! I’m in Canada so I won’t be able to get it from Amazon, but I did find it on Ebay. I am willing to give this a try and I will also use it on my face and ears. I have acne, I know it’s due to yeast.

    I had this years ago and it left on it’s own. But I remember it took months. And it wasn’t nearly as bad as it is now. Does yours come back if you stop using the Candida Soap?

    Thanks!
    Val

    #121041

    Percyfaith
    Participant
    Topics: 28
    Replies: 58

    _valeree;59537 wrote: I’m pretty sure I have seborrheic dermatitis. I started a candida cleanse about 2 weeks ago and all of a sudden I have this flaky and itchy scalp. Is this a die-off symptom?

    Thanks!

    Conventional dermatologist had me on Extra strenght T-gel shampoo which did help a little but I hated the smell and did not trust the chemicals in it.

    My issues with Seborrheic Dermatitis were on my body not so much on my scalp and I believe were are caused by candida overgrowth and histamine intolerance. I still suffer some but the simple inexpensive tips (Dead Sea Salt and the plain Aveeno) in this article have greatly helped me. She stresses in the article that you must diagnose and pursue curing the cause which I am still working on.

    Also Goat’s Milk Soaps were recommended to me by Able who used to be on this forum.

    I use Zum Face Gentle ‘Goat’s Milk’ Facial Soap,
    http://www.vitacost.com/zum-face-gentle-facial-soap-3-oz

    Hope some of these tips help you.

    I pray things go well with your healing.

    This is the site sharing Seborrheic Dermatitis Cures that helped me
    http://bulldancer.wix.com/seborrheic-derm-cure

    I retyped ‘her’ article…Copy format and some typos corrected from original web article:

    Seborrheic Dermatitis Cures
    http://bulldancer.wix.com/seborrheic-derm-cure

    My experience and cure…
    About
    Cure #1 – Getting Rid Of Your Symptoms
    Cure #2 – The Cause
    Key Tips & Signs
    Contact
    Comments

    A little about me and the information in this site:

    I will start by saying that my Seborrheic Dermatitis is 100% clear on a daily basis and 95% clear on my very occasional worst day. I have had Seborrheic Dermatitis for over 18 years. So I know what you are going through. Seborrheic Dermatitis can be debilitating, embarrassing, frustrating, and sometimes downright depressing. I decided to create this site simply to help people’s lives for the better. If I can help even one person with this issue, it’s all worth it. Over the years, I have tried everything you can possibly imagine, done thousands of hours of research, tested natural sources (oils, etc.), diet, allergens, and even made my own concoctions. There is not a doctor or person out there that is going to tell me more about this condition. Quite frankly, I am astonished at the amount of misinformation and poor advice that is out there on the web. Moreover, information that is being given/provided by medical professionals. It’s shameful. While I am not a doctor, I believe that the information in this site can cure, or at least drastically reduce Seborrheic Dermatitis.

    While I have seen some people providing information that is on the right track, a HUGE percentage of info is seriously misguided or incomplete. So let me be clear, there is a cure. It just doesn’t come in a magical pill. There are two “cures” that I will cover in this site. The first is the “cure” for your symptoms, and the second covers a cure for what’s causing your Seborrheic Dermatitis. I have set up different pages to cover different topics, and it is important to read all of it so you have an understanding of how it all correlates. I hope it helps, and please let me know your experiences. I would love to hear them.

    CURE #1, Getting Rid Of Your Symptoms
    Before you read through this, I’d like to provide some immediate information:
    1.) If you are putting any natural oils or butters on your face, coconut oil, jojoba oil, neem oil, tee tree oil, almond oil, lavender, oil of oregano, olive leaf oil, etc. (you’ll notice I mentioned many anti-fungals, and the list goes on)…STOP immediately.
    2.) If you are using a soap of any kind, natural or otherwise, STOP immediately.
    3.) If you are using steroid creams, cortisones, or various prescriptions with side effects too numerous to mention…for the love of God..STOP immediately.

    Okay, onto curing your symptoms. So why is this happening? Well, Seborrheic Dermatitis is causing your skin to flare up because of yeast; more specifically Malassezie yeast. This yeast grows on everyone’s skin and feeds off of the sebum (oil) that your body/skin produces. With Seborrheic Dermatitis you are producing more oil than normal in your flare up areas, while also overproducing skin cells. The Malassezie yeast feeds on this oil (sebum), creating a yeast overgrowth in that area. This can cause skin irritation, inflammation, and flaky skin. The rapid skin cell production, rapid oil production, and yeast production, go hand in hand with flare ups. If you notice with Seborrheic Dermatitis your skin is dry, but it is also oily at the same time. Strange, right? Well, that is called combination skin and many people have it don’t necessarily have Seborrheic Dermatitis. This combination skin is one of the more tricky aspects of curing Seborrheic Dermatitis symptoms. You want to reduce the oil production by cleaning/drying the skin, but not completely deplete the moisture in the skin at the same time. Tricky, but do-able. So now that you understand that info, any oil you put on your face is providing a feeding ground for yeast to thrive. Various natural oils, or creams that contain natural oils, may provide you some burning relief temporarily…but you are usually taking one step forward and two-three steps back! “Well what about oils that contain anti-fungal properties to kill yeast”? The answer is no! There are many oils that have anti-fungal properties that can help kill or diminish yeast. However, you are still providing food for them to grow! Moreover, you are providing a lot of that food. It’s more food and growth than you are killing a majority of the time. Most Seborrheic dermatitis is also usually secluded to particular areas of your body or face and scalp. Those are the areas that are overproducing oil, while the other areas are not. So when you start adding additional oil to those areas, and to the areas that are not overproducing, you are actually encouraging the yeast to spread. Just know that anti-fungal oils may hurt the yeast a little bit in theory, but the amount you are feeding the yeast is more! Go ahead and try putting coconut oil on a flare up for a long period of time. When people start putting oils on their flare ups, they may experience some temporary relief and think “A cure! Let me go post about it”! However, the reductions in symptoms they experience are typically due to other factors such as : the oil is more soothing than a harsh ingredient they were using prior that was causing additional inflammation. So the oil reduces the inflammation, healing the area a bit from the ingredient intolerance/reaction, and now the inflammation subsides a bit. The Seborrheic Dermatitis is still there and will grow stronger over the long run. I also firmly believe that anyone who had any success “100% curing symptoms” with oils is because they UKNOWINGLY solved their “cure #2” (the cause) problem when switching to natural oil based solutions. Meaning, they may have been allergic to SLS, or something in their previous moisturizer, or the flare up caused them to switch detergents, diet, etc., etc. It was definitely not the oil. That said, soaps are also no good! Soaps tend to clog your pores (especially if you have hard water) no matter how natural, leave a residue on the skin, and more importantly – almost all are made of lipids which yeast feeds on. When washing with soap, you are leaving a layer of food for the yeast and providing an additional food source along with the oil you are already overproducing! So stay away from soaps and oils. What you want is something that has no oils, no soap or lipids, no chemicals, fragrances, irritants, etc., that cleans your pours/skin and kills the yeast. Forget about coal/pine tar soaps or shampoos, pyrithione zinc, selenium sulfide, ketoconazole, or any of those soaps/shampoos. Yes, they have good anti-fungal properties that can be effective, but they also have other properties and chemicals that will not work for many people and can be causing or adding to the problem. Most of those shampoos and soaps are also very harsh and irritating to the skin – which is another problem. Some cases of Seborrheic dermatitis would are much worse because of irritation to the skin. When you have a flare up, your skin is like an open wound and the protective layer of your skin has been compromised. If exposed to harsh chemicals/ingredients, chlorine, etc., you can be compromising your protective layer and will have much more intense outbreaks than normal. So what do you use then, right?

    Your solution/symptom cure steps:
    PREFACE: Before the steps below, this is VERY important – Check your water first! chlorine in our tap water is an epidemic in my opinion, and quite a serious one. Chlorine is a known irritant that is very harsh and drying on the skin. High chlorine levels in your tap water will undoubtedly add to compromising your skin’s protective barrier and in many cases may be the actual cause for the skin issue! A lot of people (myself included) are intolerant to chlorine. Over the past number of years, cities across the United States have been switching to adding chloramine (a chemical bond of chlorine and ammonia) in the tap water. Chloramine is even worse and I believe it’s a cause for new skin issues for people across the country. Chloramine is very difficult to filter out of water, and don’t think because you have a home soft water system that it is filtering chlorine or chloramines. Even hospitals and facilities with major water filtration systems have to upgrade their filter systems to accommodate filtering chloramine. So test your water and get a shower water filter. If you have high chlorine content in your water, getting rid of the chlorine will make a drastic difference! When you hear people saying…”hmmm, I went on vacation and my seb derm went away. Must be the pool, or fruits I was eating, etc.” – no, it was most likely the chlorine free filtered water you were bathing in (as most hotels have water filtration systems). You can pick up a chlorine test kit at a pool supply store or even pet stores. They run about $10-$12, but the kit is really just adding a chart which you are paying the extra money for. So I just buy the solution itself for $2-$3 and understand that chlorine turns the water varying shades of yellow. Knowing that I will get recommendations on shower filters, the one I use is made by Pelican and runs about $70 or so on Amazon. I’ve tested my water after installing it and it works very well. Some added benefits of using a shower filter are not breathing in chlorine vapors (one shower equals drinking about 5-8 glasses or that chlorine water…yummy), better skin overall, and nicer hair! Okay, onto the steps.

    1.) Step #1 Sea Salt – I recommend soaking your Seborrheic dermatitis in sea salt as a first step. It cleans / drys and heals the skin, similar to the effect that swimming in the ocean has on an open wound. The sea salt you want use is unrefined, no fragrances, PURE sea salt with trace minerals. Generally the more trace minerals that are in the salt, the better. I like using Dead Sea Salt, but have seen great results (sometimes even better) with some table sea salts sold at natural foods stores. If it has some color to it like the Himalayan salt etc., it will work just fine. Soak/wash your Seborrheic dermatitis for a few minutes. If you have a flare up, or your skin’s protective layer is compromised, it will sting. Don’t worry. You will notice after a day or two of doing this, there will be no more stinging (like the rest of your normal skin!). Most people will see a dramatic reduction in flare up within 24 hours, and many times just hours! By the way, don’t go thinking that stinging is always going to mean good things with other treatments. In most cases it’s not a good thing, but with the sea salt it is as it’s cleaning and healing. So after soaking with sea salt, pat dry with a clean towel and move to step two.

    2.) Step #2 The No Moisturizer Goal – Moisturizing is great for skin, but not great for Seborrheic dermatitis. Ideally the goal based on principle would be to not use moisturizer at all. However, it will be needed at times and you need to choose the right one. This is difficult because almost all the moisturizers out there contain oils (even Cetaphil), fragrances, parabens, lanolin, and a multitude of chemicals that can irritate sensitive skin. Moreover, they leave an additional feeding ground for yeast. The moisturizer that I use and recommend is Aveeno. I stick to their traditional green bottle standard moisturizer (has least amount of chemicals from what I’ve seen), and their Eczema Therapy Moisturizer. They are both very good, and I like them for a number of reasons. They are unique in composition being oatmeal based. They don’t have the same creamy consistency (from oil usually) that 99% of moisturizers do. It leaves a matte finish, and a protective layer that retains moisture without leaving a greasy face. The oatmeal is very soothing on the skin as well. I simply feel that this is the best option I have found yet for adding moisture, protecting, not irritating, and soothing the skin. Apply ONE layer of this AT A TIME. You want just enough to be comfortable. So see how one layer feels, give it a few minutes, and then add another layer if needed.

    3.) Step #3 A Daily Non-soap, Oil Free Cleanser – Once your face no longer stings when using the sea salt, it’s time to move to an easy daily cleansing routine. You want to use non-soap, oil free cleanser that doesn’t have fragrance, parabens, or other know irritants. As a general rule of thumb you want to stay away from anti-aging and strong acne type of ingredients like retinol or salicylic acid. In addition, a cleanser should clean, but not leave your skin too tight or dry. That is a sign that the cleanser you are using is too stripping for your skin. Some tightness is okay, but feeling like your face is about to crack like the Grand Canyon is not. Trying to find a cleanser that meets this criteria is no easy task, but I have found two that I like very much for now (always looking) and are effective. The first one is Neutrogena’s Ultra Gentle Hydrating Cleanser. The second is La Roche-Posay Toleriane. Both of these clean well but are also very gentle on my skin (and my skin would normally get unbearably tight using anything else…God forbid soap or shampoo). The Neutrogena is slightly more drying with a great effect on inflammation, redness, and an overall clean feeling. So I wash my face with this at night, and add a layer or two of Aveeno afterwards to moisturize my skin overnight. When I wake up, I take a shower and wash my face with the Toleriane. The Toleriane is extremely gentle and actually moisturizes the skin pretty well for a cleanser. So after I have washed my face with the Toleriane, I leave for the day and don’t add anything else. Sometimes I will add a layer of Aveeno, but only when I feel the need. I play with this on a regular basis to see any differences and you should too. I live in Southern California and the air quality can be especially bad some days. So days like that, I might add a layer of the Aveeno as it adds a little bit of a protective barrier from the elements.

    Overall, it’s more important to understand the principles in this information than the actual products’. Maybe someone will come up with an even better regimen that falls in line with the same principles. Or maybe you live in a country where the products I mentioned are not available. If you understand the principles, you can hopefully find products or a regimen that will fit, that may be just as effective, or even more effective! Everyone is different, including your environment. So understanding and testing is key. Good Luck and I hope this helps your symptoms.

    Cure #2 – The Cause
    The skin is the body’s first line of defense signaling that something is wrong. And let me tell you, something is wrong. Everyone is different and their body’s react differently to things. Take a shell-fish allergy for example. Some people may break out in hives, some may get lock-jaw and some may have their throat close up. In those examples shell-fish is the cause, and the reactions obviously differ. But various body reactions don’t just happen with allergies, they can happen with a number of issues. For example, when there’s too much bad flora in your gut and your liver has too many toxins. This takes a very strict diet/detoxing over time to heal. This is not an allergy, but something that can cause a reaction in your body. In my or your case, our body reacts with dermatitis! Wonderful, huh? Hey, it’s better than throat closing! Anyway, what you need to understand is that everyone is different and everyone has a different cause. The causes are mainly going to be allergies, or something health related. That is what you need to figure out. When you do, and you address it…Seborrheic Dermatitis is gone! Just remember, the dermatitis you have is a reaction. It’s not just “hey sorry, this is how your body works” like doctors may have you believe. It doesn’t just happen, just like your throat wouldn’t close under healthy/normal conditions. It’s a reaction…and you need to find your cause. That said, your cause could be an allergy to food, environment, detergent, SLS in shampoos, any chemical out there, or you name it. If its health related, it could be bad flora (candida overgrowth) in the gut needing probiotics and diet detoxing, or it could be a vitamin deficiency where your body is not functioning properly. So it’s not just a food allergy, or just a health problem. It’s different for everyone. The next time you see someone ranting or even selling their “it’s 100% a food allergy” cure, know that they might be helping some people whose cause is actually a food allergy, and seriously misguiding many others at the same time. To help find your cause, I would try and get health blood tests and allergy blood tests (food and elemental) as a first step. If you don’t want to spend the money or time, then I would immediately start an elimination diet eating only cooked vegetables and lean meat & fish for a week. Then slowly introducing the biggest allergens back, one by one. Those include dairy, wheat, gluten, oats, nuts, etc. Notice I mentioned cooked vegetables. I say this because I have a friend that breaks out in full body rashes after eating any raw vegetables (organic or not), due to an intolerance for pesticides (yes they are in organic too – look up organic spraying). Also, keep in mind that there is a difference between a food allergy and a food intolerance. Allergies are more instantaneous and intolerances are more slow acting. Most people actually have food intolerances and don’t realize it because it takes a 1-3 days to affect them. Obviously that makes them harder to pin point too. There are different tests for food intolerances vs. food allergies. So make sure you are clear and understand what type of testing you are getting. Also do some research on food intolerance testing. I think they can certainly help identify foods to look into, but they are also a bit flawed.

    As much as I hate to say this, you could also have more than one cause, and possibly many; like bad gut + multiple food intolerances + an SLS intolerance to your shampoo. You could also have a compound problem; chlorine in your water + a food intolerance that’s compounding your flare up. That is why making sure you have a good foundation (mentioned in Cure #1) is needed (e.g. chlorine free shower water). Okay that being said, some immediate steps you will want to take are the following: Try to cut out any obvious bad habits you might currently have. So cut down or eliminate eating crap food, smoking, drinking lots of coffee, alcohol, eating high amounts of sugars, etc. Also, try to boost your immune system. Boosting your immune system will always help with Seborrheic dermatitis. I mention ways to do so in the Tips page. Take a break from all the chemicals/ingredients in major products (shampoos, detergents, etc.) and use some common sense with symptom signs. For example, if you have seb derm all over your body…common sense would tell you that you might want to switch laundry detergents, or think maybe about a mite allergy, etc. You have Seborrheic dermatitis just on your scalp? Why? Common sense might tell me that it’s something in my shampoo as a first place to investigate. You’re a smoker and tend to get sinus congestion when you smoke…ever think you might be allergic?!! Some of those statements may seem silly, but hopefully you get the point.

    Key Tips & Signs

    1.) Every Product Stings Your Skin – If no matter what product you use stings your skin, your water is most likely the culprit. Checking your water for chlorine is one of the first things anyone with Seborrheic Dermatitis should do. Not only could it be your cause all together (chlorine intolerance), but clean chlorine-free water helps create a foundation for healthy skin.

    2.) Detox – If you are having a very strong flare up that you can almost feel from the inside outwards (if you have Seborrheic Dermatitis you know what I mean), I would suggest immediately changing your diet, and doing some sort of detox, liver cleanse, etcetera. There are tons of cleanses out there to choose from. I may update this with some later, but for now that is up to you and your research. Ultimately, I believe that certain very intense cases of Seborrheic Dermatitis are a clear sign of body/liver/gut toxicity. There are even 2-3 day cleanses that will should help considerably in these scenarios.

    3.) Boost Your Immune System – When you have a flare up, it is always good to boost your immune system. Try eliminating as much unhealthy stuff from your diet as possible, try to quit smoking, alcohol, etc. Eat immune boosting foods (raw garlic is great), take supplements (I always take vitamin C, Echinacea/Goldenseal, and L-Lysine whenever feeling run down), exercise, or whatever you can do to boost that immune system. A strong immune system helps greatly with Seborrheic dermatitis.

    4.) Seborrheic Dermatitis on Scalp – If you have not already tried to move to natural ingredients shampoos, try doing so. There are A LOT of people who have intolerances to some of the harmful ingredients and sulfates in most shampoos. Sometimes simply switching to a natural or organic shampoo can solve the problem all together. If Seborrheic dermatitis is strictly being found on the scalp, that is a good sign it is an ingredient in the shampoo/s being used or tried. If not, I would try to follow the same steps for facial Seborrheic dermatitis as the principles should be the same.

    #121060

    Danny33
    Member
    Topics: 25
    Replies: 362

    Val,

    I’m not dependent on the soap and could stop.
    I will likely continue use until my flora is recovered.

    While my face is perfectly clear now my scalp can itch if I skip a few days.
    It’s not so bad but I enjoy having clear skin and an inch-free scalp so I continue to use the soap.

    My seb derm was at its worst when I further damaged my already crippled flora with anti-microbials (e.g. Oregano Oil, Undecylenic acid, raw garlic, etc.). Increased inflammation caused my seb derm to become so inflamed and painful I often missed work.

    Also, I’m trying other soaps at the moment with similar ingredients and will post results if they work.
    Candida Freedom soap is ridiculously expensive but works very well.

    -D

    #121061

    lolcandida
    Member
    Topics: 0
    Replies: 32

    This is a sign the diet is to low in carbohydrate increase carbohydrate and that symptom will resolve.

    #121075

    _valeree
    Member
    Topics: 5
    Replies: 5

    PercyFaith,

    I cannot thank you enough for the great information you provided. Not only will I benefit from this information but I am sure that other people will.

    I do not have a filter for my shower so I will be looking in to getting one. I also have eczema on my body.. does your information also apply to eczema? Also, do you have any recommendation for natural shampoos?

    So when my face started flaring up I started using coconut oil… apparently I was wrong!! I will try using the products that you recommended. The Aveeno moisturizer is is specifically for the face or is it the Daily Moisturizing Lotion?

    I have TONS of allergies such as peanuts, nut, apples, legumes, etc. And on top of that I have candida. My body is VERY sensitive to everything. This is why it’s so hard for me to get my skin under control.

    Val

    #121086

    Percyfaith
    Participant
    Topics: 28
    Replies: 58

    _valeree;59596 wrote: PercyFaith,

    I cannot thank you enough for the great information you provided. Not only will I benefit from this information but I am sure that other people will.

    I do not have a filter for my shower so I will be looking in to getting one. I also have eczema on my body.. does your information also apply to eczema? Also, do you have any recommendation for natural shampoos?

    So when my face started flaring up I started using coconut oil… apparently I was wrong!! I will try using the products that you recommended. The Aveeno moisturizer is is specifically for the face or is it the Daily Moisturizing Lotion?

    I have TONS of allergies such as peanuts, nut, apples, legumes, etc. And on top of that I have candida. My body is VERY sensitive to everything. This is why it’s so hard for me to get my skin under control.

    Val

    Val I am glad to pass that information along because it helped my rashes so very much. I did not write that article but I cut and pasted my personal copy of it in my post so folks could read within this site instead of going to the authors web site. I think it was written by a woman who goes by the tag BullDancer on Curezone. The Aveeno is the plain daily moisturizing lotion. It does not say for face on my tube. It is a little hard to find since most places carry all the later formulas. I think she said to look for, and my tube has it, a block of Green where the words “daily moisturizing lotion” shows through in the cream color of the tube. My 2.5 oz tube also has a green cap. I did not want to use it since I am not familiar with some of the chemical sounding ingredients in it but in the article BullDancer said while it was ‘commercial’ it contains healing oatmeal and I wanted to do what worked for her.

    I have food sensitivities too and am also very sensitive to topical things. One other thing that helped horrible rashes behind my ears. The rashes were behind both ears and ran from wet to dry flakey and they were painful. The salt began healing them right away but I also gave up my pierced earrings and I think that helped too. They were 14kt white gold but who knows maybe there was some alloy or nickel in there causing problems. I was sad to give up wearing earrings but grew my hair longer and am just happy not to have that rash. BullDancer’s Protocol helped me so very much. I had suffered with rashes on and off for since 2005. I still have one rash at my belly that I think is candida related but conventional dermatologist called all my rashes Seborrheic Dermatitis and suggested the Extra strenght T-gel Shampoo and prescription steroid creams that I used a tiny bit but do not believe are healthy at all and I think BullDancer mentions how bad an option those are.

    I am unsure about how the protocol might work with Eczema, but I hope the ideas give you and others relief and healing.

    Percyfaith

    ps Oh I gave up shampoo years ago. Have never missed it. The only time I have used it is after I condition my hair with Castor Oil. I get tons of compliments on my hair. Google
    No Poo and check out the sites about not using shampoo and Wikipedia even has a page about it— http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/No_poo

    #121091

    _valeree
    Member
    Topics: 5
    Replies: 5

    Percyfaith,

    I bought the La Roche Posay Toleriane line yesterday and also washed my face with himalayan salt. So far so good! My skin felt a bit itchy and tingly after the salt, but I took it as a sign that it was working. I also bought the Aveeno Baby Wash and Baby Lotion which has oatmeal. It was really weird washing myself and using beauty creams that had no scent at all! Felt kind of refreshing actually.

    I used the T-Gel Shampoo once and it seemed to have helped. But I will ditch it and try and find a natural shampoo/conditioner. I just read about the No Poo and seems interesting! I am not sure if I am willing to give up my hair routine just yet, but I’ll take it in to consideration.

    And hopefully in continuing to cleanse my skin will get better.

    Thank you so much!!

    #171275

    TimR90
    Participant
    Topics: 0
    Replies: 1

    Great information but, I read the ingrediënts of Toleraine here in the Netherlands.

    It says it has shea ‘butter’ you say not to use butter or oils, also Glycerin which wikipedia says it’s out of animal fat or plantbased oils.

    Another thing is, some say coconut helps, it just gets worse the first 2-3 weeks.

    I also am intolerant to grains, corn etc. I am currently trying the GAPS diet.

    What do you think?

    Thanks in advance.

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