Safe Foods?

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This topic contains 11 replies, has 5 voices, and was last updated by  meggiedarling 5 years, 11 months ago.

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  • #105111

    meggiedarling
    Member
    Topics: 4
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    I’m following the strict diet- its been just over two weeks. I’m looking at the test foods and things to slowly reintroduce and test that are beneficial. Then, when comparing them to the reintroduction and maintenance list for when the infestation is cured, I see a lot missing. I want to do this right and don’t want to introduce the wrong things, but there are several things I’m wondering when they could potentially be “safe”.

    Things like: quinoa, chia seeds, nuts, brown rice and brown rice pasta, pumpkin (for bread) and summer squash.

    I have so many others I’m wondering about but these are the main ones for now.

    Thank you!

    #105116

    approximately_me
    Member
    Topics: 28
    Replies: 186

    I believe the problem with any rice is that it is a carb easily turned into sugar by the body and gobbled up by candida. Some people have cured their infestation with brown rice, but it will be more difficult. I believe the same goes for quinoa (but I’m not sure). If you’re looking for a brown rice pasta substitute, there is buckwheat pasta.

    The problem with nuts is that as a dried item, they often also have moulds on them which will both feed the candida and hurt your immune system. Personally, a lot of my symptoms diminished when I stopped eating almonds.

    I don’t know about pumpkin or squash.

    #105120

    raster
    Participant
    Topics: 104
    Replies: 6838

    Starch is the problem and not carbs in my opinion. You need carbs to survive.

    I would place the quinoa and brown rice products in the same category; high starch food items high on the glycemic index. I would save both of these for stage 3, which is basically when you become symptom free and are long over die off. I have been on the diet for close to 2 years and didn’t start to eat rice products until 6-9 months into the diet. And if you do eat them, eat them very sparingly…no more than once a week. Rice and quinoa can also be problematic to digest; I personally couldn’t digest either of them very well for a long time. Fermenting foods in the gut needs to be avoided at all costs.

    Black, red, and wild rice are better alternatives to brown rice because they have greater nutritional properties and you likely have not had them in your lifetime.

    If you soak and/or roast the nuts, this will remove most of the molds. I wouldn’t introduce these until stage 2 or when you are over die-off and feel pretty good.

    Chia seeds, pumpkin, flax, and summer squash are the safest food items you listed. Chia seeds and flax will contain molds but at lower levels when compared to nuts. Cooking these items typically will kill off the mold. Summer squash is a bit more unhealthy than pumpkin which is highly anti-inflammatory and has a number of benefits. I have a post about the benefits of pumpkin somewhere on the forum. It will help heal leaky gut and remove the toxins.

    If you are planning on consuming pasta with tomato sauce; keep in mind that tomatoes contain high levels of sugar when concentrated in something like a sauce. A cup might contain 20g of sugar. Tomato sauce should be a stage 3 item in my opinion. It’s also a fruit and not a vegetable. Nightshades can be problematic for many on the diet.

    I would eyeball servings of beans and look at the bean family. They are high in starch but have a number of benefits and are generally less problematic than a number of other foods.

    -raster

    #105138

    meggiedarling
    Member
    Topics: 4
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    Ok thanks guys! I tried Soba noodles tonight and felt a little “off” so I think that may another one to hold off on. I may try to get my energy from the coconut breads…I will retry them next.

    #105142

    stovariste
    Member
    Topics: 12
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    approximately_me;43636 wrote:
    The problem with nuts is that as a dried item, they often also have moulds on them which will both feed the candida and hurt your immune system. Personally, a lot of my symptoms diminished when I stopped eating almonds.

    I also confirm that many symptoms gone once I dropped nuts from the diet.

    #105148

    approximately_me
    Member
    Topics: 28
    Replies: 186

    meggiedarling;43658 wrote: Ok thanks guys! I tried Soba noodles tonight and felt a little “off” so I think that may another one to hold off on. I may try to get my energy from the coconut breads…I will retry them next.

    That’s too bad. Buckwheat is a problem for me as well. It isn’t for many people.

    #105166

    alexalgebra
    Member
    Topics: 41
    Replies: 643

    At first, when I couldn’t digest much of anything, I just forced myself to eat more vegetables if I was hungry, even if I wanted starch/carby things. If you can do rutabaga without getting too bad of a die-off reaction from it, it feel more filling sometimes than, say, a bunch of leafy greens. It just takes more veggies to fill up than carbs or starch. Also, I eat/snack every couple of hours. I used to make huge batches of Bieler Broth to sip on all day for snacks; I would literally go through a big pot of it every two days. It was formulated by a doctor for optimal healing for people “convalescing”, it’s perfect for candida, and it’s deeeelish! I posted a recipe in the recipe forum but to recap, it’s something like this (this is just from memory)…

    1 lb of organic green beans (I usually use just a bag of frozen organic ones for ease; not as good as fresh though)
    2 lb organic zucchini
    3+ stalks of organic celery
    1/2 bunch of organic parsley
    2-3 cloves of organic garlic
    1-3 tbsp organic virgin coconut oil
    1 cup filtered water

    I think it’s important to make this entirely organic, personally, because it’s for optimum healing and during a crucial time in treatment.

    Put 1c water in a pot and heat it up, add green beans and cook for 5 min or so. Chop up the zucchini and celery and add to pot, cover. Heat until the veggies just start to get soft, not too mushy (my indicator is when the zucchini just starts to turn color, you know, almost a little translucent).

    Dump everything into a blender and blend up a little, just until it starts to get liquid. Add the parsley, garlic, and coconut oil (you can put it in solid; it will melt). Puree until it’s as smooth as you can get.

    You can kind of mess with the recipe and add more or less or the ingredients. I like a lot of garlic, coconut oil, and parsley, personally. I think it’s more effective that way. You can also add in other fresh herbs or green onions at the end.

    #105173

    meggiedarling
    Member
    Topics: 4
    Replies: 4

    Thanks! I may have to try that…though I live in Texas so soup is the last thing on my mind with all this HEAT! Haha

    I’m going to try coconut flour tonight and see how that is. But I feel like I’m experiencing more die off today, probably because I began coconut oil as well last night. That may have been the “reaction” with the Buckwheat. I will try it again in a few weeks and see.

    #105205

    alexalgebra
    Member
    Topics: 41
    Replies: 643

    I actually used to eat the soup cold a lot as well, because I’m lazy, LOL.

    Good luck!

    #105519

    meggiedarling
    Member
    Topics: 4
    Replies: 4

    raster;43640 wrote:

    Chia seeds, pumpkin, flax, and summer squash are the safest food items you listed. Chia seeds and flax will contain molds but at lower levels when compared to nuts. Cooking these items typically will kill off the mold. Summer squash is a bit more unhealthy than pumpkin which is highly anti-inflammatory and has a number of benefits. I have a post about the benefits of pumpkin somewhere on the forum. It will help heal leaky gut and remove the

    I would eyeball servings of beans and look at the bean family. They are high in starch but have a number of benefits and are generally less problematic than a number of other foods.

    -raster

    So when would it be ok to reintroduce these things, typically? I’m going into my fourth week and will be starting yogurt and then the probiotics this week. I held off because of extra die off I was feeling.

    #105527

    alexalgebra
    Member
    Topics: 41
    Replies: 643

    Most people are on the strict forum diet for 6-18 months before reintroducing foods. I have been eating chia seeds pretty much all along and haven’t had trouble, but I don’t have a lot of them, same with flax. I started those ones maybe a month or two in. I’m heading towards six months right now, fyi, with a speedy recovery, and I feel I am still not quite ready to introduce anything not on the strict diet. I was going to this month, but I think I’m going to wait until August when I’m a little bit more stable.

    #105683

    meggiedarling
    Member
    Topics: 4
    Replies: 4

    Thanks for the response and glad to hear you’re speeding along the recovery process! I have a hunch that Im in for the long haul, so I’m trying to be patient!

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