Question to Able

Home The Candida Forum Candida Questions Question to Able

This topic contains 10 replies, has 5 voices, and was last updated by  orka1998 6 years, 11 months ago.

Viewing 11 posts - 1 through 11 (of 11 total)
  • Author
    Posts
  • #78003

    Chlofloso
    Member
    Topics: 28
    Replies: 104

    Hi Able,

    I’ve got a question about buckwheat. I read in some of your posts that buckwheat cannot feed the Candida because it is not a grain. Now I was wondering: why can the Candida feed on grains more easily than on buckwheat? Since buckwheat contains starch (Wikipedia on buckwheat: “Starch
    71–78% in groats
    70–91% in different types of flour
    Starch is 25% amylose and 75% amylopectin.”) I wonder why this starch does not feed the Candida? Is it a different kind of starch?

    Please note that I’m not asking this to question your diet. I completely trust your diet and am following it. I just ask because I want to understand and because it makes it much easier if I can explain to people around me why I can or cannot eat certain foods. When I explain it to them with reason, they accept it very easily.

    Also, if you have time, I’d be very thankful if you could read my latest post in the thread “Candida log” in the stories section and give some input in case I should change something. I’m not eating the coconut bread since it enhances my mucus production, so I’d like to know whether it’s ok to eat more buckwheat bread instead.

    Thanks a lot,

    Chloë

    #78010

    raster
    Participant
    Topics: 104
    Replies: 6838

    From what I’ve read buckwheat is actually 25% starch and not the levels you have mentioned. Nearly everything you eat that is on the allowed foods list feeds candida despite you thinking otherwise; candida can live on just about anything. Buckwheat is a prebiotic which feeds beneficial bacteria in the gut. Additionally it is a better alternative than rice and most people are not allergic to buckwheat.

    -raster

    #78015

    JaneneBean
    Member
    Topics: 8
    Replies: 35

    Again with the buckwheat breads and coconut breads….WHERE do I get these? Do I make them? Are there recipes here on the forum? Why is coconut bread allowed? What are the ingredients? I’d LOVE to have some sort of bread but there isn’t anything I’m allowed to have at the health food store. It’s a tiny store and they have to order things in. I don’t have a large heavy duty mixer, so I’m thinking that making bread might be out of the question for me.
    Thanks for any information, I’m so curious to know what makes these breads different and therefore allowable on the diet.

    #78017

    raster
    Participant
    Topics: 104
    Replies: 6838

    Janene here’s the coconut bread recipe:

    http://www.thecandidadiet.com/forum/yaf_postst746_Coconut-Flour-Bread.aspx

    I have altered it using my own flours that I’ve researched that are helpful for the diet. Basically this bread is one of the main foods a lot of us members eat on the forum. If you cannot find the ingredients at your local store, you can purchase the flours online and have them shipped to you.

    You cannot purchase these breads at any store out there that I know of. Coconutn (and similar) bread is allowed because it won’t feed the candida very much and is very filling.

    Pluses about the bread:

    1)No starch (buckwheat is slightly starchy)
    2)Not a grain (like wheat, rice, etc)
    3)No gluten
    4)No sugars or subsugars (actually like 4g per loaf, but this is very low. A head of lettuce has 3g of sugar as comparison).
    5)No dairy (except eggs)
    6)No molds
    7)People are usually not allergic (if they are, its from the eggs or coconut flour)
    8)Good source of protein
    9)easy to make (can make in 10 mins)

    -raster

    #78021

    Able900
    Spectator
    Topics: 92
    Replies: 4811

    Chlofloso wrote: I’ve got a question about buckwheat. I read in some of your posts that buckwheat cannot feed the Candida because it is not a grain. Now I was wondering: why can the Candida feed on grains more easily than on buckwheat? Since buckwheat contains starch (Wikipedia on buckwheat: “Starch
    71–78% in groats
    70–91% in different types of flour
    Starch is 25% amylose and 75% amylopectin.”) I wonder why this starch does not feed the Candida? Is it a different kind of starch?

    Yes, I’m aware of the fact that starch is in more than just a few of the foods that are on the strict diet list and also of the possible problems with these foods, and I have no doubt that the starch can and does feed the Candida because it’s impossible for us to eat enough to stay alive and not feed the Candida. But how many people are aware that green vegetables contain starch as well? These include spinach, mustard greens, lettuce, broccoli, green beans, artichoke, cabbage, cucumbers, kale, green peppers, and Brussels sprouts, among others.

    If you’ve read the entire diet, then you’ve read the section which explains why coconut flour, buckwheat, rice bran four, and other such foods are such important aspects of any Candida diet, and that’s because, in order to cure a Candida overgrowth, it is imperative that you feed the beneficial bacteria in the intestines. If you should fail to do this, it would be similar to bringing a pet home, confining it to a cage and giving it water but nothing more; we know what would happen to the animal. Beneficial bacteria are living beings which must also be fed in order to survive; and I’m convinced that not feeding the bacteria correctly can often contribute to the cause of a Candida overgrowth.

    Vegetable fibers can do this to a degree, but other prebiotic food sources are also extremely important, such as the quality prebiotics provided by foods like rice bran flour and buckwheat.

    Why does Candida normally prefer wheat over buckwheat even though it contains starch is the question:

    We all know that Candida can survive on wheat which is a grain, however, buckwheat is of a very different makeup as far as ingredients and identification is concerned. Instead of being a grain, buckwheat is actually in the family of Polygonacea. This family of plants includes herbs, which is where buckwheat fits into the family. Unlike wheat, herbs do not contain gluten, so no doubt this has something to do with the reason why Candida prefers wheat over herbs.

    In reality, once the Candida has survived without their food supply long enough, they can adapt to the shortage to the point of feeding on other food sources. This is why we add antifungals to the treatment as well as why we alternate between the different types, because of Candida’s amazing adaptive nature.

    This is probably not what you were looking for, but it’s the best I can do without digging into additional research.

    Able

    #78115

    Chlofloso
    Member
    Topics: 28
    Replies: 104

    Thank you for the reply. This helps to understand, at least to a good part. Of course I read the entire diet including the section on the benefits of buckwheat, I just didn’t understand the question with the starches, especially after reading sentences like “buckwheat doesn’t feed candida” in the forum. If I would rely on this sentence, it would mean that I could eat as much buckwheat as I want. Now I know that I should not overdo it.

    Happy easter,

    Chloë

    #78122

    Able900
    Spectator
    Topics: 92
    Replies: 4811

    Chlofloso wrote: … especially after reading sentences like “buckwheat doesn’t feed candida” in the forum. If I would rely on this sentence, it would mean that I could eat as much buckwheat as I want.

    I suppose most of us just type the above rather than going through the entire explanation every time a similar question is asked. All we want to do is get the idea across that buckwheat and other such foods, even though they present possible problems, normally have more of a positive effect than negative. Perhaps we shouldn’t, but we also assume that members are aware of the fact that this type of food should never be overused.
    This is why buckwheat is listed as a “test” food. Test foods are different from other foods that are not labeled as such, and any test food should be eaten carefully with an eye out for possible reactions.

    Able

    #78170

    orka1998
    Participant
    Topics: 53
    Replies: 673

    JaneneBean wrote: Again with the buckwheat breads and coconut breads….WHERE do I get these? Do I make them? Are there recipes here on the forum? Why is coconut bread allowed? What are the ingredients? I’d LOVE to have some sort of bread but there isn’t anything I’m allowed to have at the health food store. It’s a tiny store and they have to order things in. I don’t have a large heavy duty mixer, so I’m thinking that making bread might be out of the question for me.
    Thanks for any information, I’m so curious to know what makes these breads different and therefore allowable on the diet.

    Hi Janene,

    These breads would be very easy to prepare. You don’t need a mixer, just put the dry ingredients in a large bowl and stir them so they combine. Then add eggs and mix with a wooden spoon (the one you use to cook and stir food while cooking for example), then add liquids slowly, I add oil(s) first, and mix, and keep doing that until you are out of all ingredients and you will most likely have a mass that is a consistency of a smoothy or something. Oil the pan you will bake it in (for a nice loaf I suggest you try to find a deeper narrow pan if you can then you will have a nice slice of bread) and pour the mass in there. Pop it in the oven and bake at 180-200 degrees C for at least 45 minutes. Test with the wooden toothpick (insert it in the middle of the bread and pull out. If there is stuff that sticks to it, your bread is not done yet so put it back for little longer).

    It is so quick to do and easy. You should definitely try it.

    Hope this helps. Have fun baking 🙂

    Arijana

    #78172

    orka1998
    Participant
    Topics: 53
    Replies: 673

    Able900 wrote:

    … especially after reading sentences like “buckwheat doesn’t feed candida” in the forum. If I would rely on this sentence, it would mean that I could eat as much buckwheat as I want.

    I suppose most of us just type the above rather than going through the entire explanation every time a similar question is asked. All we want to do is get the idea across that buckwheat and other such foods, even though they present possible problems, normally have more of a positive effect than negative. Perhaps we shouldn’t, but we also assume that members are aware of the fact that this type of food should never be overused.
    This is why buckwheat is listed as a “test” food. Test foods are different from other foods that are not labeled as such, and any test food should be eaten carefully with an eye out for possible reactions.

    Able

    Hi Able,

    If you could add some logical explanation only you can (and thank you for making it so easy to understand!) for limiting coconut bread. Is it the potential of die-off or what? I’ve seen posts about not having more than three slices per day but am not sure I ever seen any explanation of why.

    I assumed that buckwheat and oat bran are safe to eat as much as we want since it feeds good bacteria. Should I still limit it?

    If yes, what would be the limit I should not cross?

    For instance, I sometimes have three tablespoons of oat bran cooked like oatmeal for breakfast or snack, but I also eat 3-5 slices of oat bran/buckwheat bread. Is this too much? Or does the feeding good bacteria even out with potential of feeding the bad guys?

    Thanks in advance for your response!

    Arijana

    #78220

    Chlofloso
    Member
    Topics: 28
    Replies: 104

    Perhaps we shouldn’t, but we also assume that members are aware of the fact that this type of food should never be overused.

    Makes sense. Thanks again.

    To Arijana: I was wondering the same, especially since I can’t tolerate too many eggs. I like them, but if I have too many they make me feel sick. I’m now eating only vegetables for dinner (a lot of them) and having more yogurt, that way I can limit the buckwheat.

    Chloë

    #78230

    orka1998
    Participant
    Topics: 53
    Replies: 673

    Chlofloso wrote:

    Perhaps we shouldn’t, but we also assume that members are aware of the fact that this type of food should never be overused.

    Makes sense. Thanks again.

    To Arijana: I was wondering the same, especially since I can’t tolerate too many eggs. I like them, but if I have too many they make me feel sick. I’m now eating only vegetables for dinner (a lot of them) and having more yogurt, that way I can limit the buckwheat.

    Chloë

    Hi Chloe,

    I don’t do well with too many eggs either. I was also diagnosed yesterday with stomach hernia and erosion (acid) so this was the cause of sensitivity to some of the foods and not the treatment. I now must split up my three meals into 5-6 per day. Bread and oat bran are my staple while at work and on the go as it’s difficult to come up with that many easy meals.

    I hope someone elaborates on the issue so we know what to do. This is easier for me, but if I must cut it out to get better I guess I will find a way to do it even though I might be a bit cranky about it 🙂

    Arijana

Viewing 11 posts - 1 through 11 (of 11 total)

The topic ‘Question to Able’ is closed to new replies.