Kombucha- a probiotic rich mushroom tea? Yay or nay?

Home The Candida Forum Foods & Recipe Ideas Kombucha- a probiotic rich mushroom tea? Yay or nay?

This topic contains 6 replies, has 4 voices, and was last updated by  Rabelais 4 years ago.

Viewing 7 posts - 1 through 7 (of 7 total)
  • Author
    Posts
  • #121292

    Sarah135
    Member
    Topics: 3
    Replies: 0

    Hello! I’m wondering about kombucha. It is chock-full of probiotics, prebiotics, and enzymes. It also is brewed from a mushroom and, I think, contains yeast. Some people say it’s great for Candida and some say not. Thoughts?

    #121297

    raster
    Participant
    Topics: 104
    Replies: 6838

    Kombucha is derived from a seaweed. I recommend it if you are doing a specific s. boulardii protocol where you take s. boulardii with kombucha for a month or so. This should consume a ton of the yeast in your body and your sensitivities to bad foods will decrease temporarily afterwards and during its use.

    -raster

    #170740

    HonesT
    Participant
    Topics: 1
    Replies: 3

    Youtube has great info for Kombucha, also research with Google.

    The store bought stuff is loaded with sugar so don`t bother unless you make your own, same goes for probiotic yogurt look up Yogourmet they have a good yogurt maker and also sell Yogurt starter with probiotics :]

     

    Heads up, look for a non Homogenized milk for making yogurt you should never consume Homogenized milk it has been processed in a way that does not allow your body to absorb the fat and protein due to them being blended together and the biology of our body sees this man made bond of the fat and protein molecule as a foreign substance.

    #170744

    Rabelais
    Blocked
    Topics: 3
    Replies: 268

     
    Your best bet with kombucha is to buy the professionally created stuff. As HonesT said, do watch out for the sugar content.

    Of course, some sugar is unavoidable, even if you decide to grow your own kombucha. That’s because kombucha feeds on sugar. Without sugar, it’s not possible to grow kombucha.

    Therefore, when buying professionally grown kombucha, don’t be scared when you read that the stuff contains sugar. Just watch out for the <i>amount</i> of sugar. Added sugar (which can be recognized by the high amounts of it) is bad, residual sugar from the growing process just indicates that the kombucha has been grown in an authentic, natural way.

    The reason to prefer professionally grown kombucha over home-grown variants is that kombucha is easily contaminated with malignant fungus. Some of these fungus infections are recognizable by the color, the odor, or the taste of your kombucha. But other fungus infections, which might be quite dangerous to your health, are almost unnoticeable. Therefore, I would prefer the professionally grown kombucha, which is routinely checked for such dangers.

    Rabelais

     

    #170745

    Rabelais
    Blocked
    Topics: 3
    Replies: 268

    Further on the remark of HonesT about homogenized milk –

    Homogenization is primarily meant to prevent the milk from separating into a layer of fat on the top, and mostly fatless milk at the bottom. This is done by breaking up the fat globules into smaller globules. The smaller the globules are, the slower they rise to the top. So in reality homogenization does not totally prevent the fat from separating from the milk; instead, it delays this process sufficiently to be unnoticeable.

    Homogenization also involves mixing larger quantities of milk. The taste and consistency of natural milk may vary from cow to cow and from day to day. Modern consumers don’t like that, they want the taste and the consistency of their milk to be predictable and to be the same each day. This wish is accomplished by mixing the milk in large tanks to reduce variations.

    Neither of these processes (making the fat globules smaller, and mixing the milk) makes the product undigestible. As HonesT wrote, fat and proteins are blended they are not changed in any way. The body will still see milk as a foreign substance, but that is only natural, because everything that enters our stomach is a foreign substance.

    Rabelais

     

    #170751

    HonesT
    Participant
    Topics: 1
    Replies: 3

    The Kombacha eats up all the sugar, added sugar after that Kombacha is done is really childish and unhealthy to our digestive ecosystem…

    You need to do more research about Homogenization looks to me Like you just copy and pasted the 1st article you read.

    There is controversy about everything online and speaking in public, I suggest more reading and research and to make up your own mind and not just take my word for it.

    I did a lot of research and reading into Homogenized milk if you have a basic understanding of what atoms and molecules are you will be able to grasp it, if not read up on that aswell.

    I`m not looking for a debate so no further insights from me on this thread, research yourself and good luck.

     

    Cheers

    #170753

    Rabelais
    Blocked
    Topics: 3
    Replies: 268

     

    Kombucha digests sugar – but not necessarily all of it. Kombucha will die when all its food has been consumed. The very fact that kombucha is still alive implies that some sugar is still present.

    I agree with you that there is no need to add additional sugar. That’s a local American thing, I guess, where most food is sweetened to extreme degrees when compared to most of the world. Anyway, home-grown kombucha will also contain some sugar – it’s a necessity.

    About homogenization: I have a thorough knowledge of physics and chemistry. You seem to be unaware of the difference between mixing/blending and a reaction. It’s like the huge, and I mean: huge, difference between a mixture of hydrogen and oxygen, and the product that is created when hydrogen and oxygen react chemically.

    What you call ‘research’ could well be reading a lot of sites that basically repeat each other. That means that you are convinced that you read 100 opinions that all support each other and that are thus very strongly founded, while in reality you just read 100 copies of a single, unsupported opinion.

    When researching, do remember that there’s often a difference in the quality of what you read.

    Rabelais

     

Viewing 7 posts - 1 through 7 (of 7 total)

The topic ‘Kombucha- a probiotic rich mushroom tea? Yay or nay?’ is closed to new replies.