Is (—-) ok on the diet?

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This topic contains 14 replies, has 5 voices, and was last updated by  shayfo 6 years, 2 months ago.

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  • #93754

    11j11
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    Topics: 6
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    I thought starting a thread where people who aren’t quite sure about certain foods could ask if they’re ok or not would be useful. Hopefully this would help concentrate all of these queries into one thread, providing a useful resource for everyone, in a concise manner.

    This was originally called “Is pure wasabi ok?” but I thought that with certain foods like this that aren’t in any list I’ve come across and don’t have obvious sugar or starch content, it’s hard to tell if it’s ok or not.

    #93764

    raster
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    Topics: 104
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    If wasabi is hot and spicy, hot and spicy foods should be avoided at all costs on the diet.

    -raster

    #93916

    11j11
    Participant
    Topics: 6
    Replies: 11

    Thanks raster. I did not know this. Where is this/did I miss this info?

    #93930

    Able900
    Spectator
    Topics: 92
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    raster;32205 wrote: If wasabi is hot and spicy, hot and spicy foods should be avoided at all costs on the diet.

    11j11;32357 wrote: I did not know this. Where is this/did I miss this info?

    That statement seems to be more in the line of an opinion I believe; jalapeno peppers (for example) contain capsaicin which is a powerful antifungal. They also help to clear the lungs of congestion.

    And of course there are spicy herbs which are acceptable for the diet. Cilantro (the leaves of the Coriander plant) is considered a spicy herb and it’s on the strict diet. The same goes for cumin and other spices/herbs.

    “Real” wasabi paste (ground wasabi leaves) contains antifungal properties and is anti-inflammatory, but keep in mind that it also contains antibacterial properties, but then so does garlic.

    Able

    #93933

    alexalgebra
    Member
    Topics: 41
    Replies: 643

    I have a few foods I’m curious about.

    – chickpea miso (since it’s fermented, does that make it any better?)
    – pumpkin (lots of vitamin a!)
    – pumpkin seeds, if they are soaked/sprouted/dehydrated (anti-parasitic and also delicious)
    – sunflower seeds, soaked/sprouted/dehydrated
    – millet (is on some diets, but not on the strict one abel emailed me)
    – cultured butter
    – alcohol-free vanilla (it’s in vegetable glycerin)

    I think that’s all for now!

    Thank you so much! I cannot express how much this site has helped me, even though I just found it two days ago!

    #93936

    11j11
    Participant
    Topics: 6
    Replies: 11

    Ok, so, wasabi is ok?

    This would be good news for sushi.

    (I think it’s ground root not leaves, I could be wrong)

    #93937

    alexalgebra
    Member
    Topics: 41
    Replies: 643

    There are 2 kinds of wasabi – real wasabi, which is ground wasabi horseradish, and fake wasabi, which is not the actual wasabi root, but something else that I can’t quite remember. The real deal is often hard to find and expensive and is not just the cheap green paste at the sushi-go-round.

    #93941

    Able900
    Spectator
    Topics: 92
    Replies: 4811

    alexalgebra;32374 wrote: I have a few foods I’m curious about.

    The main reason that a lot of “iffy” foods are not on the strict diet has to do with other members as well as myself experiencing Candida symptoms from eating the foods during our own treatment. I’m speaking of “Candida symptoms” and not die-off and not allergic reactions, but Candida symptoms which can only mean that the Candida was able to benefit from the food in some way. In the list of your foods below, I’ll use “Reason No. 1” if this is the reason that I do not advocate the food. This doesn’t mean that you simply ‘cannot eat it” but it means exactly what I described, that others have received Candida reactions from the food and therefore I cannot say that it is safe for the treatment.

    – chickpea miso (since it’s fermented, does that make it any better?)
    Reply: I would treat miso as a test food. It’s really going to depend on how well the miso is fermented.

    – pumpkin (lots of vitamin a!)
    Reply: Reason no. 1 (there are safer ways of obtaining vitamin A)

    – pumpkin seeds, if they are soaked/sprouted/dehydrated (anti-parasitic and also delicious)
    Reply: Again, treat these as a test food only if they have been treated as you described. Even so, they can still present problems.

    – sunflower seeds, soaked/sprouted/dehydrated
    Reply: Simply testing may not result in reactions soon enough. Raster may ring in on this one. I’m pretty sure he blames sunflower seeds as being one of the foods which set him back on his own treatment.

    – millet (is on some diets, but not on the strict one abel emailed me)
    Reply: Reason no.1

    – cultured butter
    Reply: Interesting. This would probably be about the same as yogurt. Definitely worth a test.

    – alcohol-free vanilla (it’s in vegetable glycerin)
    Reply: Sounds fine. Where did you find that?

    I believe the imitation wasabi is made from horseradish, mustard powder, cornstarch, and probably some other ingredients. And I’m sure you’re right about the wasabi root.

    Able

    #93943

    raster
    Participant
    Topics: 104
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    If you have leaky gut and eat anything spicy, you will feel very bad. If you don’t have leaky gut and eat something spicy, you likely will not notice any difference. Its more of a leaky gut thing more than anything else. I couldn’t tolerate paprika on the diet but now I can. I could tell it was setting me back and making my leaky gut worse. Its all about whether or not it works for you. Some spices are inflammatory.

    Another benefit to spicy foods though is that it causes sweating which aids in detox (via the skin).

    If you were to eat certain spicy foods daily in large amounts, this could set you back like eating regular vinegar daily, alcohol, etc. It all depends which spices you use and your experience.

    I apologize for any confusion I may have caused.

    -raster

    #93971

    alexalgebra
    Member
    Topics: 41
    Replies: 643

    They have alcohol free vanilla at Whole Foods, Fred Meyer’s natural foods section (my state’s version of the Kroger chain), places like that. You can also order it off Amazon, it looks like, although the brand I use (Frontier) is not on there. They have a couple of other flavors too, that I haven’t tried, like peppermint and lemon, I believe.

    #93972

    alexalgebra
    Member
    Topics: 41
    Replies: 643

    Also – how do you tell the difference between a candida reaction vs die off vs allergy/intolerance reaction?

    #93978

    shayfo
    Member
    Topics: 18
    Replies: 668

    So tolerance for spicy food is an indicator for leaky gut? I’ve been trying to figure out if I have it, since I have a gluten allergy, but it seems possible that my gluten allergy is a separate issue. I don’t have any discomfort from eating food that’s pretty spicy. I’ve been putting cayenne on my salads throughout the cleanse.

    #93980

    alexalgebra
    Member
    Topics: 41
    Replies: 643

    I definitely have leaky gut (extreme food sensitivites…pre-candida diet, I could literally only eat eggs and small portions of brown rice without a reaction, sometimes I could tolerate a few veggies but only cooked and in small portions), but I have never had a poor reaction to spicy foods, except that I just don’t care much for them.

    #93992

    raster
    Participant
    Topics: 104
    Replies: 6838

    In my opinion, if you are allergic to anything at all, it is caused by leaky gut.

    There really isn’t a difference between a candida reaction and an allergic reaction except that people who have candida reactions get them suddenly whereas someone with an allergy has likely had it their whole life.

    -raster

    #93996

    shayfo
    Member
    Topics: 18
    Replies: 668

    Interesting, Raster. My gluten symptoms date back well over a decade, though I never saw the connection between them until a few years ago. I don’t have health insurance or the income to do testing (America!), so I’ve never found out if I have Celiacs disease or an actual allergy. I did take antibiotics for tonsillitis pretty much every winter as a child, so maybe I’ve always had a candida issue. Something to think about, anyway.

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