Injeera – fermented teff bread!

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This topic contains 9 replies, has 6 voices, and was last updated by  shayfo 5 years, 6 months ago.

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  • #99693

    alexalgebra
    Member
    Topics: 41
    Replies: 643

    Woo! I just made injeera tonight and so far, so good!

    I used this recipe – http://www.food.com/recipe/authentic-injera-aka-ethiopian-flat-bread-96980

    Ingredients:

    Servings:
    10
    Units: US | Metric
    1 1/2 cups ground teff (180 g)
    2 cups water
    salt, to taste
    vegetable oil, for the skillet
    Directions:

    1
    Mix ground teff with the water and let stand in a bowl covered with a dish towel at room temperature until it bubbles and has turned sour; This may take as long as 3 days, although I had success with an overnight fermentation; The fermenting mixture should be the consistency of a very thin pancake batter.
    2
    Stir in the salt, a little at a time, until you can barely detect its taste.
    3
    Lightly oil an 8 or 9 inch skillet (or a larger one if you like); Heat over medium heat.
    4
    Pour in enough batter to cover the bottom of the skillet; About 1/4 cup will make a thin pancake covering the surface of an 8 inch skillet if you spread the batter around immediately by turning and rotating the skillet in the air; This is the classic French method for very thin crepes; Injera is not supposed to be paper thin so you should use a bit more batter than you would for crepes, but less than you would for a flapjack pancakes.
    5
    Cook briefly, until holes form in the injera and the edges lift from the pan; Do not let it brown, and don’t flip it over as it is only supposed to be cooked on one side.
    6
    Remove and let cool. Place plastic wrap or foil between successive pieces so they don’t stick together.
    7
    To serve, lay one injera on a plate and ladle your chosen dishes on top (e.g., a lovely doro wat or alicha). Serve additional injera on the side. Guests can be instructed to eat their meal without utensils, instead using the injera to scoop up their food.

    ALEX’S TIPS…
    – the fermented batter smells pretty gross
    – you actually want to let them cook for pretty long, or they will fall apart and be squishy globs
    – use 1/3 cup of batter, not 1/4 cup
    – use a lot of oil

    #99696

    shayfo
    Member
    Topics: 18
    Replies: 668

    I’m excited to eat yet another home-fermented item. I’ll make this soon.

    #100028

    M
    Member
    Topics: 72
    Replies: 253

    By ground teff, do you mean just regular teff flour?

    #100059

    alexalgebra
    Member
    Topics: 41
    Replies: 643

    M;38531 wrote: By ground teff, do you mean just regular teff flour?

    Yep!

    #100090

    raster
    Participant
    Topics: 104
    Replies: 6838

    Alex, if you haven’t already done this, go to bob’s red mill store and you can save maybe $2-3 per bag off their flours. I stock up once every month or two and use it as an emergency food supply. They even sell flours in bulk. I probably save $20+ per month or so by going there.

    They have the whole grain teff at bob’s red mill and I am wondering if the bread can use this, or how you can use the whole grain teff when cooking? I am interested in adding it to the top of breads, etc.

    I’ve heard about a fermented kefir teff bread and I have heard of ethiopian bread, but I didn’t know the ethiopian bread was fermented.

    Please post a picture if you can sometime.

    -raster

    #100093

    alexalgebra
    Member
    Topics: 41
    Replies: 643

    I am the worst food photographer ever, but there it is! And my asparagus curry, LOL. It was delicious.

    Thanks for the Bob’s tip – I haven’t been out there in ages because it’s kind of a long drive and I hate driving, haha. Maybe I’ll get up early and go tomorrow. I even got a coupon in the mail for buy 2 get one free!

    The Bob’s teff is what I used. I have also used it to make pancakes from a recipe shayfo came up with.

    #108247

    DaughterNature
    Member
    Topics: 20
    Replies: 82

    Alex,

    When would you introduce this? I am 5 weeks in…

    #108248

    shayfo
    Member
    Topics: 18
    Replies: 668

    Alex actually stopped eating teff, I believe, though I think we both tested it around a month and a half or so. (I would not normally speak for him, but he’s away from computers for a week.)

    #108255

    Aggie4habitat
    Member
    Topics: 2
    Replies: 7

    shayfo;46769 wrote: Alex actually stopped eating teff, I believe, though I think we both tested it around a month and a half or so. (I would not normally speak for him, but he’s away from computers for a week.)

    Do you mind if I asked why you and he stopped eating it? I tried it tonight for the first time in a 1/2 teff, 1/2 buckwheat pancake. Hoping nothing bad happens!

    #108258

    shayfo
    Member
    Topics: 18
    Replies: 668

    Teff is a grain, and grains are inflammatory, so I stopped eating it experimentally to see if I felt an improvement. Same for Alex, I think, especially because he had pretty gnarly leaky gut and avoiding inflammatory foods is especially important in that situation.

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