Fibre Supplements that are ok for the candida diet??

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This topic contains 9 replies, has 4 voices, and was last updated by  Javizy 6 years, 12 months ago.

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  • #87149

    Rachie2712
    Member
    Topics: 8
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    Is there any fibre supplements or foods that can help constipation that are safe on the candida diet?

    #87151

    Latka
    Member
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    I would rather rely on getting my fibre from vegetables. For me broccoli always works well in getting things going.

    Flax seeds can be helpful as well. I grind mine and sprinkle on food or add to smoothies.

    I would stay away from psylliumk husk however. I read so many great things about it online that I was fooled into getting it. Got even more constipated as a result.

    #87153

    Rachie2712
    Member
    Topics: 8
    Replies: 13

    I have eating vegetables and broccoli every day and still aren’t getting enough fibre from them 🙁

    I will try flaxseeds.

    I had some psylliumk husk today. I read that is was good for candida??

    #87157

    Latka
    Member
    Topics: 5
    Replies: 128

    To resolve my constipation I need to eat A LOT of vegetables; a lot more than I used to. Otherwise I notice no effect.

    If you are taking psyllium husk just make sure you drink a lot of water with it. I thought I drank a lot (2 pints) but it wasn’t enough and I got pretty clogged up from it. But I also know people for whom it was helpful. They certainly advertise psyllium as being a good colon cleanse and the main site recommends it. I know the forum here isn’t too enthusiastic about it.

    #87159

    Latka
    Member
    Topics: 5
    Replies: 128

    btw, some other constipation remedies that I’ve found useful:
    – slippery elm (capsules to take or can be made as a tea)
    – Triphala plus (Ayurvedic herbal remedy, non habit forming)

    I started with the slippery elm, took 1-2 caps 2-3 times a day to get an effect (but I was pretty constipated). Now I am taking Triphala (2 caps in the evening with warm water) and it seems to be working well.

    #87160

    Javizy
    Member
    Topics: 20
    Replies: 945

    Constipation is more likely a sign of too many vegetables too fast. Your gut flora needs time to adapt to new kinds of soluble fibre. The insoluble fibre in flaxseeds helps draw water into the stool, which softens it and makes it easier to pass, so you need to make sure you drink a bit more water than usual if you use them. I’d avoid fibre supplements and stick to foods like Latka said. Slippery elm can help in a similar way to flaxseed, and can soothe the GI tract, especially if you make a soup/jelly out of it.

    #87230

    Rachie2712
    Member
    Topics: 8
    Replies: 13

    I’ll try slippery eml and flaxseeds. Thanks for your help!

    #87264

    raster
    Participant
    Topics: 104
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    I would try out oat bran and miracle fibar (aka inulin). Miracle fiber heals leaky gut and you can add to many of your foods.

    -raster

    #87274

    Javizy
    Member
    Topics: 20
    Replies: 945

    raster wrote: I would try out oat bran and miracle fibar (aka inulin). Miracle fiber heals leaky gut and you can add to many of your foods.

    Raster, do you know where the oat bran = good idea comes from originally? I ask because I’ve seen a few studies recently comparing different kinds of fibre, and oat bran and other brans/grains always come bottom of the class. In one measuring stool weight, carrots were more than three times as effective. I think the polysaccharides are too complex for the gut flora to digest well. Dr. Ayers doesn’t speak favourable of oat and rice bran either.

    Dr. Ayers wrote: It is hard for me to have a balanced evaluation of brans. They are excessively hyped for their benefits and their problems are avoided. Most people like oat bran, because it encourages them to overeat starches. I don’t consider oats to be nutritious and they are bad choices for breakfast, because of their high starch content.

    The insoluble beta-glucans, I consider to be medicinal, i.e. potentially unhealthy because they are inflammatory (“stimulate the immune system”). They can be used to improve the performance of vaccines, for example, because they heighten inflammation that is conducive to aggressive antibody production. This is not something that would normally be healthful, because it also contributes to autoimmune disease. Stimulating the immune system is not normally healthful. At the same time, blocking immune reactions is also only appropriate in emergencies, e.g. anaphylatic shock or cytokine storm.

    Bran can be considered to be modestly prebiotic, because your gut flora can learn to digest some portions of the polysaccharides, but I think that as the repository of the defensive molecules responsible for protecting seeds against pathogens, brans of all types are more toxic than healthful.

    #87275

    Javizy
    Member
    Topics: 20
    Replies: 945

    I forgot I saved some of the links. When we’re talking about prebiotics, SCFA is the end-product we’re really hoping for. See what you think.

    The vegetable fibers were significantly more fermentable than were the cereal brans, as evidenced by greater NDF digestibility and increased productions of SCFA, H2, and CH4, despite the presence of fermentable starch and protein in the latter. We concluded that vegetable fibers may more effectively stimulate colonic fermentation than cereal brans do.
    http://pmid.us/2161101

    Carrot pomace produced the largest amounts of gas and SCFA. Apple pomace produced high concentrations of gas but intermediate concentrations of SCFA.
    http://jas.fass.org/content/79/4/919.full.pdf

    Conversely, rats fed on carrot or cocoa fibre produced a large amount of CH4 but no H2 and generated a different profile of short-chain fatty acids (SCFA). The lowest amounts of gases and SCFA were found in rats fed on wheat bran, pea and oat fibre.
    http://pmid.us/7547841

    Approximately 20 g/day of concentrated dietary fibre from carrot, cabbage, apple, bran, and guar gum was added to the controlled basal diet of nineteen healthy volunteers. Faecal weight increased by 12% on bran, 69% on cabbage, 59% on carrot, 40% on apple, and 20% on guar gum.
    http://pmid.us/74533

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