Excellent material about S. Boulardii.! Incredible beneficial yeast

Home The Candida Forum Candida Research Excellent material about S. Boulardii.! Incredible beneficial yeast

This topic contains 6 replies, has 3 voices, and was last updated by  dvjorge 4 years, 11 months ago.

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  • #117578

    dvjorge
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    #117587

    jameskep
    Participant
    Topics: 25
    Replies: 220

    S. Boulardi might not be beneficial for everyone. S. boulardi might be capable of going fungal. Raises the question if someone has too much fungal candida present whether or not Fungal candida can cause S. Boulardi to turn fungal. For someone who has enough good bacteria in the gut it might not be a problem though.

    Safety of administration
    “S. boulardii is administrated to patients in a lyophilized
    form and the treatment is well tolerated. However, some
    rare cases of S. boulardii fungemias have been reported
    in patients with an indwelling central venous catheter (de
    Llanos et al., 2006; Hennequin et al., 2000; Lherm et al.,
    2002). The origin of the fungemia is thought to be either
    a digestive tract translocation or a contamination of the
    central venous line by the colonized hands of health
    workers (Hennequin et al., 2000). This raises the question
    of the risk-benefit ratio of S. boulardii in critically ill or
    immunocompromised patients. Thus, administration of S.
    boulardii should be contraindicated for patients of fragile
    health, as well as for patients with central venous catheter
    (Herbrecht and Nivoix, 2005).”

    Hard to say what they mean by “immunocompromised” or “fragile health”. In the gut that might translate to too much pathogens in the gut?

    #117590

    dvjorge
    Participant
    Topics: 283
    Replies: 1368

    jameskep;56108 wrote: S. Boulardi might not be beneficial for everyone. Looks like S. boulardi is capable of going fungal(fungemia). Raises the question if someone has too much fungal candida present whether or not Fungal candida can cause S. Boulardi to turn fungal. For someone who has enough good bacteria in the gut it might not be a problem though.

    Safety of administration
    “S. boulardii is administrated to patients in a lyophilized
    form and the treatment is well tolerated. However, some
    rare cases of S. boulardii fungemias have been reported
    in patients with an indwelling central venous catheter (de
    Llanos et al., 2006; Hennequin et al., 2000; Lherm et al.,
    2002). The origin of the fungemia is thought to be either
    a digestive tract translocation or a contamination of the
    central venous line by the colonized hands of health
    workers (Hennequin et al., 2000). This raises the question
    of the risk-benefit ratio of S. boulardii in critically ill or
    immunocompromised patients. Thus, administration of S.
    boulardii should be contraindicated for patients of fragile
    health, as well as for patients with central venous catheter
    (Herbrecht and Nivoix, 2005).”

    Hard to say what they mean by “immunocompromised” or “fragile health”. In the gut that might translate to too much pathogens in the gut?

    Rare cases in severe immunocompromised patients.! There have been rare cases of liver failure after taking Aspirin. I don’t see any potential danger taking S. Boulardii. However, the list of benefits is incredible, including its anti-candida activity.

    Jorge.

    #117591

    dvjorge
    Participant
    Topics: 283
    Replies: 1368

    dvjorge;56111 wrote:

    S. Boulardi might not be beneficial for everyone. Looks like S. boulardi is capable of going fungal(fungemia). Raises the question if someone has too much fungal candida present whether or not Fungal candida can cause S. Boulardi to turn fungal. For someone who has enough good bacteria in the gut it might not be a problem though.

    Safety of administration
    “S. boulardii is administrated to patients in a lyophilized
    form and the treatment is well tolerated. However, some
    rare cases of S. boulardii fungemias have been reported
    in patients with an indwelling central venous catheter (de
    Llanos et al., 2006; Hennequin et al., 2000; Lherm et al.,
    2002). The origin of the fungemia is thought to be either
    a digestive tract translocation or a contamination of the
    central venous line by the colonized hands of health
    workers (Hennequin et al., 2000). This raises the question
    of the risk-benefit ratio of S. boulardii in critically ill or
    immunocompromised patients. Thus, administration of S.
    boulardii should be contraindicated for patients of fragile
    health, as well as for patients with central venous catheter
    (Herbrecht and Nivoix, 2005).”

    Hard to say what they mean by “immunocompromised” or “fragile health”. In the gut that might translate to too much pathogens in the gut?

    Rare cases in severe immunocompromised patients.! There have been rare cases of liver failure after taking Aspirin. I don’t see any potential danger taking S. Boulardii. However, the list of benefits is incredible, including its anti-candida activity. You are confusing fungemia with morphogenesis. Fungemia is a word used en medicine when a fungus reaches the bloodstream. S. Boulardii don’t morph, neither it does the worse candida species causing fungemia.

    I don’t know about any single case of Fungemia in the case of this syndrome even with the intestines plagued of fungus.

    Jorge.

    #117595

    jameskep
    Participant
    Topics: 25
    Replies: 220

    If S. cerevisiae can morph like candida than why couldn’t S.boulardi?

    http://mcb.asm.org/content/21/4/1272.full.pdf

    Do you have research that shows S.Boulardi can’t morph?

    #117598

    raster
    Participant
    Topics: 104
    Replies: 6838

    I generally wouldn’t worry about it because you typically only take boulardii for a short period of time.

    -raster

    #117603

    dvjorge
    Participant
    Topics: 283
    Replies: 1368

    jameskep;56116 wrote: If S. cerevisiae can morph like candida than why couldn’t S.boulardi?

    http://mcb.asm.org/content/21/4/1272.full.pdf

    Do you have research that shows S.Boulardi can’t morph?

    James,

    I haven’t read any document about S.Boulardii morphogenesis. Anyway, candida albicans is a pathogen, S. Cervisiae and S. Boulardii aren’t. The fact they can morph doesn’t mean they become pathogens, at least until there be proofs of it.

    The fact that candida albicans is polymorphic doesn’t mean the pathogen is only the elongated form. Candida Albicans is a pathogen in ANY form. Morphogenesis increase its virulence, tissue invasion, and growth factor. However, yeast cells are also infectious organisms and are massively present during an infection. Morphogenesis is regulated by some mechanisms still not too clear. There are many things involved. Nutrient deprivation and serum favor morphogenesis. Ph, temperature, and the environment also influence its phenotype changes.

    Sporadic candida albicans cells living in the intestines aren’t enough to cause considerable damage and symptoms to the human body. This is the case of a “normal” balanced flora. These non-forming colonies candida albicans single cells are controlled by antifungal substances produced by the anaerobic bacterial flora and the immune system. After some amount of antibiotics, this mechanism is disrupted and candida growths. It growths as individual cells and possibly forming germ tubes and mycelia. The result is an infection where different forms are present. This happens because candida albicans is an opportunistic pathogen, a pathogen controlled by the friendly bacterial flora and the immunity. This isn’t the case of S. Boulardii so far. It is considered a beneficial yeast until the opposite be demonstrate.

    You can read in the web about candida switching from yeast to fungus as the cause of this syndrome because there is ignorance about the reality. There is lack of knowledge written everywhere about this syndrome. It has been hard for me to learn and to correct many myths I have read about it. Still, I don’t know all, but I have had the opportunity of sharing documents and knowledge with two recognized Mycologists who have explained me many things.

    Yes, it is TRUE candida albicans gain virulence, mobility and tissue invasion after morphing from a single yeast to an elongated form. However, candida albicans is “commensal” only when there are sporadic cells living in the human colon and other mucosal areas. When the conditions are ready, these sporadic cells can GROWTH and become infectious not matter what phenotype change they adopt. Of course, more virulence means a more severe infection.

    Jorge.

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