Eggs and gas. Can anyone verify this egg info?

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This topic contains 8 replies, has 3 voices, and was last updated by  JBR74 6 years, 12 months ago.

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  • #85630

    JBR74
    Member
    Topics: 8
    Replies: 14

    Hello all,
    Having eggs as a staple on this diet is wonderful. Love them. I recently developed terrible sulphur smelling gas. I’ve had this in the past which is part of what I attributed to IBS, or poor digestion. However, I was recently able to pinpoint the development of this terrible gas to the consumption of hard-boiled eggs specifically. So I did some cautious ‘research’ on the internet and read that hard boiled eggs can have that effect, whereas scrambled or eggs not cooked in their shell won’t. This is due to the fact that the naturally occurring sulphur in the egg can escape when the egg is cracked and cooked; when it’s boiled, it’s trapped inside. The gray lining around the yolk is an indication of the sulphur within the egg. I’m hoping this is true cause I can give up hard-boiled eggs, but would be mortified if I had to give up eggs altogether due to some type of intolerance to them. Does anyone else have this problem? Do any of you know if the hard-boiled egg info is legit? Thanks!

    Egg-tastic-ly yours,
    jbr74

    #85632

    JBR74
    Member
    Topics: 8
    Replies: 14

    Part two of this question is, would there be anything else about this diet (I am very diligent with approved veggies, eggs and coconut flour based breads) that would be causing the terrible sulphur smell? I was fine for the first 3 weeks, but then the gas started. No real changes to my diet have been made (except that I added some hard-boiled eggs to give me another egg option.

    #85670

    raster
    Participant
    Topics: 104
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    There are a variety of things that can cause this…but the main culprit is poor digestion, and an additional culprit is dying candida.

    Low levels of HCL (hydrochloric acid) could be the cause and you can take either HCL from a vitamin store, digestive bitters, or zypan which has HCL and other minerals.

    I experienced a lot of gas after protein personally and the zypan pretty much cured my problem.

    -raster

    #85673

    luckymom2one
    Member
    Topics: 7
    Replies: 14

    I had to give up hard boiled and scrambled eggs because I found that they would give me severe stomach aches. But I can eat eggs baked into a cake etc. I also have a sulfa sensitivity and any drugs containing sulfa will give me a severe headache. These things are very confusing. My sons Dr. told me it is the way you cook it. Also there is a good sight for food intolerances. Although she specializes in kids it can be helpful for all.

    http://www.drrapp.com/video-center/

    #85674

    JBR74
    Member
    Topics: 8
    Replies: 14

    Thanks Raster. So you don’t feel it’s necessarily hard boiled eggs vs. eggs prepared differently? I’ve wondered if I should add HCL to my list; I guess I will try. Is there a chance that it’s just too much protein (is that even possible? I have anywhere from 2-4 eggs a day and I have sardines 1-2 times per week. Any other protein is coming from veggie sources.

    #85675

    luckymom2one
    Member
    Topics: 7
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    I also forgot to ask if you considered a rotation diet to avoid reactions to foods. My son has some foods he cannot eat on a daily basis but if he eats them only occasionally he is fine. There are many books on the rotation diet.

    #85676

    JBR74
    Member
    Topics: 8
    Replies: 14

    Thanks luckmom2one. I’ve wondered about trying to rotate my food options more. I try to do that a bit, but I know there are certain things I gravitate to for almost every meal (zucchini, asparagus, eggplant and spinach) It’s hard to rotate when you have limited choices and need to eat enough so as not to faint! 🙂 Do you find that it does work to cook yours son’s veggies differently? or do you take them out of his diet altogether for a certain amount of time?

    #85679

    luckymom2one
    Member
    Topics: 7
    Replies: 14

    JBR74 wrote: Thanks luckmom2one. I’ve wondered about trying to rotate my food options more. I try to do that a bit, but I know there are certain things I gravitate to for almost every meal (zucchini, asparagus, eggplant and spinach) It’s hard to rotate when you have limited choices and need to eat enough so as not to faint! 🙂 Do you find that it does work to cook yours son’s veggies differently? or do you take them out of his diet altogether for a certain amount of time?

    I know how limited choices are. My sons were extremely limited for awhile that is why I started rotating so he would start gaining weight again. I have also heard that the things you crave the most are usually the exact thing you are sensitive too. My sons issues are not so much with vegies as they are with grains. He just craves these but gets constipated if he eats them too regularly. A true rotation diet is not to eat the same food group but every I think 4 days. But as you said when your diet is limited that is practically impossible. So with grains I try not to feed them anymore than once a week if that.

    #85681

    JBR74
    Member
    Topics: 8
    Replies: 14

    Thanks for the input. I understand grains are a hot button for intolerances. I think I’m going to cut back on eggs a bit (ugh!) and completely stop hard boiled eggs. I rotated the type of ‘bread’ I’ve been eating and went back to strict coconut and a little buckwheat (I had experimented with teff for a while).

    I hope that your efforts work out well for your son. It’s bad enough going through this myself, I can’t imagine what it must be like for your son. He’s lucky to have some who cares enough to go through the ‘hell’ with/for him 🙂

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