Does iron feed candida?

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This topic contains 6 replies, has 5 voices, and was last updated by  Able900 6 years, 9 months ago.

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  • #85801

    Angor
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    I asked in my other post but didn’t get any response, so I’ll just ask separatly 🙂

    My iron is a bit low. Would a suppliment feed possible candida/SIBO? Earlier, dvjorge wrote: “Iron increase candida like crazy”. Does this go for natural iron too, found in spinach, liver and such?

    #85825

    Javizy
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    I think most microbes leech minerals to form biofilms. It’s probably why your levels are low in the first place and probably the basis of Jorge’s comment. If you’re not deficient, I wouldn’t touch iron supplements, and even if you are I’d stick to food sources. Taking vitamin C with vegetables helps increase the poor bioavailability of iron in greens, for example. Low levels inside the normal range are probably beneficial, since iron accumulation is a big problem as you age, but obviously anaemia would be a problem that deserves attention.

    #85832

    raster
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    I would only take iron if its recommended by a doctor.

    -raster

    #85840

    Jackie2
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    Look up foods to eat to increase your iron. I know my father had surgery and had low iron. Dr’s did not want to give him iron supplements. They wanted him to raise his levels naturally. He was very surprised that different foods actually block the absorption of iron…if I’m not mistaken spinache was one of those foods as was strawberries (we can’t eat those anyways). Best of luck. Research, research and more research….that is all we do on this crazy diet.

    #85846

    Angor
    Member
    Topics: 47
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    Thanks everyone! So, iron suppliment = bad idea …

    I got an interesting link from one of the members about Candida, Iron and Lactoferrin. Could Lactoferrin be a good idea to prevent iron deficiency?

    I was just above a deficiency, but my blood levels and ferritin was fine. Therefore my doctor didn’t think it was any problem. Though some of my symptoms like restless legs, bruises without cause, fatigue and worsening of symptoms during my period, pointed towards me being deficient.

    How would eating liver work with the candida diet? I can’t say it sounds yummy, but maybe it’s something I could do once in a while to get my iron up.

    Oh, really, is spinach something that block the absorption of iron? Everybody has always said – eat a lot of spinach – plenty of iron! Though, I do know some of the antifungals on the protocol like oil of oregano block the absorption. Or, at least I’ve read so.

    #85850

    raster
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    Eating animal organs is a great way to heal because the cells from those organs can be converted directly to cells within our body; so if you eat liver, you can heal the liver, if you eat pancreas, you can heal the pancreas (this sounds awful btw).

    I also have restless leg syndrome and my naturopath states that its not due to a deficiency in one or two minerals; its a deficiency in all minerals. So based on this, I would think that you are likely deficient in more than one trace mineral other than iron…they all are very important for the body. Taking trace mineral supplements can aid in your recovery (calcium, magnesium, zinc, iodine, and more) significantly…I also take homeopathics to reduce the demineralization problem.

    -raster

    #85855

    Able900
    Spectator
    Topics: 92
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    “Microbial pathogens must compete with the iron-withholding defense systems of their host to acquire this essential nutrient. Here, two high-affinity iron permease genes, CaFTR1 andCaFTR2, were isolated. CaFTR1 expression was induced under iron-limited conditions and repressed when iron supply was sufficient, whereas the expression of CaFTR2 was regulated in a reversed manner. Mutants lacking CaFTR1 but not CaFTR2 exhibited a severe growth defect in iron-deficient medium and were unable to establish systemic infection in mice. Thus, CaFTR1-mediated iron-uptake mechanism constitutes a virulence factor of Candida albicans and may be a target for the development of anti-Candida therapies.”

    Quoted from “Science/AAAS” June 2012, VOL. 336.

    This means that the fungal Candida will steal iron from the red blood cells in order to use it as a necessary nutrient. So it doesn’t exactly act as “food” for Candida, but more like Raster explained with various minerals which are necessary nutrients for humans.

    The article also explains that a host with certain iron deficiencies causes the Candida to exhibit a severe growth defect and therefore were unable to establish systemic a Candida albicans infection. Adding iron corrected the deficiency in the fungus and allowed the Candida to grow.

    For these reasons, I have to agree with Javizy; personally, I would try very low profile foods containing iron such as a lot of eggs, and I would use an iron supplement only if the deficiency is heading towards a severe level. I would definitely avoid liver as an iron supplement since it’s only going to hinder the treatment by overwhelming the body with ammonia therefore making an even more beneficial environment for the Candida to thrive.

    Able

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