Cultured vegetables questions

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This topic contains 17 replies, has 6 voices, and was last updated by  shell1226 6 years, 2 months ago.

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  • #93853

    shayfo
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    I’m about to start stage 1 of the diet after being on the cleanse for a few weeks. I have a bunch of homemade cultured vegetables in my fridge (sauerkraut, kimchi, and some others that are basically kraut made of different vegetables), since even before starting this whole candida voyage, I was making and eating them somewhat regularly. What difference, if any, should I expect from eating them instead of kefir or yogurt? I don’t eat dairy, and I’m not going to start (I’ve read enough anti-vegan lectures on enough candida forums/articles, so it’d be neat if I was spared that particular type of response). Also, does the type of vegetable matter? I have some that are made of Able-approved vegetables (daikon radish kim chi, napa cabbage kim chi), but I also have some that contain things that are unapproved in their regular form (sauerkraut that contains a small percentage of beets, kim chi that contains carrot shreds, cultured celery root). The beet-containing kraut was made in May, so I would assume most of the sugars have been consumed by the bacteria, but naturally I have no way of knowing for sure. Should I avoid this completely for now and just make some new beet-free, carrot-free kinds? Treat it like a test food?

    Thanks!

    #93884

    shayfo
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    Topics: 18
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    bumping this hoping one of the experts will have some advice.

    #93888

    kodaz2005
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    While I’m not an expert, I think most will tell you what one fact I received from Able one of the Moderators and experts on the forum. Kefir is one of the most beneficial forms of Probiotics you can take while on the diet. The Kefir is powerful and can build colonies of beneficial flora in your body. If you can’t eat dairy, I would consider Coconut Kefir. Many believe it’s the most ideal choice.

    I just wouldn’t skip the Kefir just because you don’t like dairy. Personally I eat Sauerkraut, Yogurt, Coconut Kefir, Milk Kefir & Pill based Probiotics such as Megaflora. The more strains of good bacteria you can get the better.

    #93891

    shayfo
    Member
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    Do you make your coconut kefir? If so, what’s your process? I feel like I’ve read a few times that it’s often less successful than dairy kefir.

    #93896

    UncleOxidant
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    Making coconut kefir is pretty much the same process as making dairy kefir. You need dairy kefir grains. Put them in a container with some coconut milk, stir it a bit, put a cloth over the opening – I use a rubber band to hold it on. After 24 to 36 hrs you’ve got coconut kefir. I made a couple of batches this way, but didn’t like the taste as much as the goat milk kefir – YMMV. I also just tried making hemp milk kefir and the results were not good – well I didn’t think so anyway, too effervescent for my tastes and definitely tastes like it has a high alcohol content. It fermented very rapidly – it was done in well under 24 hrs. So I’m back to making it with goat milk.

    #93899

    shayfo
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    thanks. do i need to make coconut milk from a whole coconut, or is the organic canned kind viable?

    #93900

    UncleOxidant
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    organic canned coconut milk should work. I used the unsweetened boxed coconut milk from Trader Joe’s.

    #93909

    shayfo
    Member
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    oh, perfect. i figured that was too adultered to use, but i’m down if it works. thanks!

    #93919

    shell1226
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    I don’t know the answer to you question, but your cultured veggies sound delish.

    #93922

    shayfo
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    They are! I’ve been missing them on the cleanse.

    #93935

    alexalgebra
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    From what I know, which is based on Donna Gates “Body Ecology Diet” school of thought, which is not always correct, the sugar in those veggies gets eaten by the bacteria and is not a problem. According to her, you can even culture sour apples and it’s okay.

    #93982

    orka1998
    Participant
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    Hi Shayfo,

    How are you culturing your veggies? I only know how to make sauerkraut or sour cabbage (whole head) with only the salt and water. Other veggies I was told you must use vinegar or something else to ferment. Can you please share your recipe?

    Thanks,

    Arijana

    #93986

    alexalgebra
    Member
    Topics: 41
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    You definitely don’t need to use vinegar! You can ferment everything else the same as sauerkraut.

    #93988

    shell1226
    Member
    Topics: 8
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    I made my first batch of cultured vegetables a couple of weeks ago using Donna Gates’ method. I am loving them! I’m really wanting to try the coconut kefir.

    #93995

    shayfo
    Member
    Topics: 18
    Replies: 668

    I just use salt for the actual lactofermentation process (you can season with other things). The ratio is 3 tablespoons of non-iodized salt per five pounds of vegetables. Chop the vegetables (the smaller the veggie pieces = greater surface area = quicker culturing), add in the appropriate amount of salt, and massage the salt into the vegetables until they begin to release water. If they get really juicy right away, I jar them up, and if not, I let them sit for a little while til they start sweating (half an hour to overnight, depending). To pack them into jars, add small amounts at a time to a clean jar and press it in very firmly. Once all the veggie pieces are in, pour in the remaining liquid, which should cover the top of the packed veggie pieces. If it doesn’t, you can make some extra brine to cover at a ratio of 1 tbsp non-iodized salt per 1 cup of water. You can either put the jar’s lid on or secure a cloth over the top of the jar with a rubberband. If you use the jar lid, you’ll need to “burp” the jar every 6-12 hours until you refrigerate it, which should be after a few days at room temperature. You’ll start to see bubbles forming between the vegetables, and some veggies change color slightly (but uniformly, and there shouldn’t be any bad smells).

    You can’t pickle ALL vegetables this way, but pretty much anything that’s sturdy works: cabbage, brussels sprouts, turnips, beets, carrots, onions, garlic, radishes, celery root, asparagus, parsnips, ginger. I’ve even included some mustard greens in a batch of napa cabbage kim chi before, and it worked well.

    I’ve heard that the Body Ecology Diet advocates lactofermentation without salt, using specific “pickling spices.” These have a shorter shelf-life but are supposed to be advantageous in other ways. I’m not well-versed in it, so I can’t really comment. A friend brought me some a year or so ago, and it was definitely flavorful.

    I hope my wordy recipe format is still helpful.

    edit: I’ve only ever used vinegar for pickling when I specifically wanted “vinegar pickles,” because they taste more similar to the Vlasic yellow-dyed crap I grew up with and still secretly love. I made some really tasty dill vinegar-pickled radishes last year. Vinegar pickling is useful in that it preserves a lot of nutritional content, but since I used distilled vinegar, it’s not contributing to the health of my gut flora to eat them at this time. I guess they’ll be waiting for me.

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