Candida Allergy test ISN'T a Delayed Hypersensitivity Test

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This topic contains 6 replies, has 6 voices, and was last updated by  jennybe 5 years, 11 months ago.

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  • #102163

    dvjorge
    Participant
    Topics: 283
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    Guys,

    I want to clarify and educate you about it.

    If you see an Allergist ( I strongly advice to see one ) you need to ask for a Candida Albicans Delayed Sensitivity test.

    This is the test that determine if you have immune response against candida or not.

    If you have chronic unresponsive fungal infections, I am sure this test will be negative.

    Candida Allergy test is another test where they aplly a drop of candida albicans extract on your skin and read the results after 5 or 10 minutes. If you react, you are allergic to candida.

    However, the Delayed Hypersensitivity test is a test that looks for your cell-mediated immunity response against the antigen ( candida albicans ) If you are normal, you must respond to the antigen.

    The test is an injected (subcutaneous) candida albicans designed extract and covered for 48 hours with a bandage. However, more advanced antigens offer results after 5 or 10 minutes.
    Then, you have to come back to the Allergist office to read the result. You must have a red spot and inflammation in that area if your immunity is active. It indicates your immune system attacked the intruder. If there isn’t reaction, you have NO intracellular response to candida albicans and THIS is the cause of your persistent candida infections.

    It is simple and easy !!! Please, learn it correct and do the necessary to be tested.

    Here is the Antigen used for Delayed Hypersensitivity (rapid result antigen). This is the most important test every candida sufferer should get.

    CANDIN® is indicated for use as a recall antigen for detecting DTH by intracutaneous (intradermal) testing. The product may be useful in evaluating the cellular immune response in patients suspected of having reduced cellular hypersensitivity. Because some persons with normal cellular immunityare not hypersensitive to Candida, a response rate less than 100% to the antigen is to be expected in normal individuals. Therefore, the concurrent use of other licensed DTH skin test antigens is recommended. The product should not be used to diagnose or treat Type 1 allergy to Candida albicans.
    CANDIN® should be administered intradermally on the volar surface of the forearm or on the outer aspect of the upper arm. The test dose is 0.1 mL. The skin should be cleansed with 70% alcohol before applying the skin test. The intradermal injection must be given as superficially as possible causing a distinct, sharply defined bleb. An unreliable reaction may result if the product is injected subcutaneously. A positive DTH reaction to CANDIN® consists of induration ≥ 5 mm.

    #102281

    M
    Member
    Topics: 72
    Replies: 253

    Two questions Jorge:

    Have you taken this particular test?

    For those of us not living in N. America, is this test available worldwide?

    Thanks.

    #102285

    mrs.candida
    Member
    Topics: 53
    Replies: 452

    M,

    As far as I can tell this test isn’t widely available even inside the US. It’s extremely hard to find an a doctor or allergist who will do this test. I live in Amsterdam and my doctor doesn’t even know what it is.

    #102818

    lmm
    Member
    Topics: 29
    Replies: 138

    Any advance on this? I’m sure people aren’t willingly being US-centric!

    #102837

    LovingLifeAgain
    Member
    Topics: 0
    Replies: 5

    Hmmm…. I used to work at an allergy office and administer allergy testing. We did something similar to what your talking about at our office.

    We usually tested Candida while we did allergy testing for molds/dust/danders.

    The first step was brushing/stamping the antigens on the forearm and waiting 15 minutes to make sure that the person wasn’t highly allergic.

    The next step would be to inject 0.1 ml intradermally and make a 5mm “wheel” (raised bump) on the upper arm
    -After 15 minutes I’d measure the wheel. If the wheel was below 9mm I’d apply another 5mm wheel of a stronger (less diluded) concentration next to it. That would be measured after 15 minutes.

    The patient was given a paper and a ruler to check and measure any delays at both 24 and 48 hrs.

    It was common for people to have delays with the Candida antigen.

    -I couldn’t believe how big of a reacion I had when I had the testing done! The 1st wheel that was put on turned into a 13mm welt! Scary to think that I am so allergic to something that is overgrowing in my body :/

    #102839

    dvjorge
    Participant
    Topics: 283
    Replies: 1369

    LovingLifeAgain;41340 wrote: Hmmm…. I used to work at an allergy office and administer allergy testing. We did something similar to what your talking about at our office.

    We usually tested Candida while we did allergy testing for molds/dust/danders.

    The first step was brushing/stamping the antigens on the forearm and waiting 15 minutes to make sure that the person wasn’t highly allergic.

    The next step would be to inject 0.1 ml intradermally and make a 5mm “wheel” (raised bump) on the upper arm
    -After 15 minutes I’d measure the wheel. If the wheel was below 9mm I’d apply another 5mm wheel of a stronger (less diluded) concentration next to it. That would be measured after 15 minutes.

    The patient was given a paper and a ruler to check and measure any delays at both 24 and 48 hrs.

    It was common for people to have delays with the Candida antigen.

    -I couldn’t believe how big of a reacion I had when I had the testing done! The 1st wheel that was put on turned into a 13mm welt! Scary to think that I am so allergic to something that is overgrowing in my body :/

    Yes, that test is for allergy to candida. However, the most important test isn’t that one but what determine your immune response to the antigen. The antigen used for allergy test is different than the used for the immune response test.
    Chronic candidiasis sufferers are negative, meaning they don’t have adequate immune response to candida albicans.

    Jorge.

    #106057

    jennybe
    Member
    Topics: 2
    Replies: 9

    Any ideas how to find someone who does this test? I agree it’s so important – I did a consult with Dr. Crandall and since have gotten the results from two blood tests she recommends that show no candida! Doing an urine test next. And must find this allergy test in or around Seattle but my regular doc has no ideas and my naturopath has only a referral to an alternative testing, not this one.

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