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There are eight currently identified members of the human herpes virus family. They are ubiquitous and extremely well adapted pathogens. The name comes from the Greek ‘herpein’ – ‘to creep’, describing the chronic, latent or recurrent nature of infections.

Research conducted on cytomegalovirus (CMV) indicates that the viral human IL-10 homolog, cmvIL-10, is important in inhibiting pro-inflammatory cytokine synthesis. The cmvIL-10 protein has 27% identity with hIL-10 and only one conserved residue out of the nine amino acids that make up the functional site for cytokine synthesis inhibition on hIL-10. There is, however, much similarity in the functions of hIL-10 and cmvIL-10. Both have been shown to down regulate IFN-γ, IL-1α, GM-CSF, IL-6 and TNF-α, which are all pro-inflammatory cytokines. They have also been shown to play a role in downregulating MHC I and MHC II and up regulating HLA-G (non-classical MHC I). These two events allow for immune evasion by suppressing the cell-mediated immune response and natural killer cell response, respectively. The similarities between hIL-10 and cmvIL-10 may be explained by the fact that hIL-10 and cmvIL-10 both use the same cell surface receptor, the hIL-10 receptor. One difference in the function of hIL-10 and cmvIL-10 is that hIL-10 causes human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) to both increase and decrease in proliferation whereas cmvIL-10 only causes a decrease in proliferation of PBMCs. This indicates that cmvIL-10 may lack the stimulatory effects that hIL-10 has on these cells.[11]

Another one of the many ways in which herpes viruses evade the immune system is by down regulation of MHC I and MHC II. This is observed in almost every human herpesvirus. Down regulation of MHC I and MHC II can come about by many different mechanisms, most causing the MHC to be absent from the cell surface. As discussed above, one way is by a viral chemokine homolog such as IL-10. Another mechanism to down regulate MHCs is to encode viral proteins that detain the newly formed MHC in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER). The MHC cannot reach the cell surface and therefore cannot activate the T cell response. The MHCs can also be targeted for destruction in the proteasome or lysosome. The ER protein TAP also plays a role in MHC down regulation. Viral proteins inhibit TAP preventing the MHC from picking up a viral antigen peptide. This prevents proper folding of the MHC and therefore the MHC does not reach the cell surface.[13]

It is important to note that HLA-G is often up regulated in addition to downregulation of MHC I and MHC II. This prevents the natural killer cell response.[citation needed]

Viruses have evolved elaborate mechanisms to target many aspects of the host’s immune response. The cytokine IFN-γ plays a central role in resistance of the host to infection via direct antiviral effects as well as modulation of the immune response. In this study, we demonstrate that the Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) immediate-early protein, BZLF1, inhibits the IFN-γ signaling pathway. BZLF1 decreases the ability of IFN-γ to activate a variety of important downstream target genes, such as IRF-1, p48, and CIITA, and prevents IFN-γ-induced class II MHC surface expression. Additionally, BZLF1 inhibits IFN-γ-induced STAT1 tyrosine phosphorylation and nuclear translocation. Finally, we demonstrate that BZLF1 decreases expression of the IFN-γ receptor, suggesting a mechanism by which EBV may escape antiviral immune responses during primary infection.