You are taking me light !!!

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This topic contains 35 replies, has 15 voices, and was last updated by  Tsunny 6 years, 2 months ago.

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  • #101073

    Tsunny
    Member
    Topics: 34
    Replies: 94

    http://www.kingbio.com/blog/aquaflora-better-than-ever/

    I am in agreement with the “Laws of Similiar” that likes cure likes. What would be wrong with something like this? There are the 9 strains of yeast in this. Is this something I can waste money on and give a try?

    #101074

    Tsunny
    Member
    Topics: 34
    Replies: 94

    I am taking the website Nutricology page with S Boulardii to my doctor to see if I can safely take this. I would advise anyone thinking of trying this to do the same. I am very anxious to try it myself. There are other products (as above) that I have come across that seem possible also under the same concept.

    #101075

    dvjorge
    Participant
    Topics: 283
    Replies: 1369

    mrs.candida;39559 wrote: This is very interesting information. Thank You.

    The topic os S.boulardii came up recently while I was discussing my treatment with Able. He pointed out a potential risk, which has me concerned.
    Here’s what he said:

    If any amount of the S. boulardii yeast was able to get into the bloodstream, this would lead to a type of sepsis because the contamination would be of exogenic origin (developed from outside the body).

    I imagine leaky gut, and the potential for the S.boulardii to get into the blood steam. Any thoughts?

    I don’t know about any single case of it. In fact, S. Boulardii translocation is very rare according to what I have read. There are probably some insulated cases of severe immune suppression where S. Boulardii has reached the blood.

    S. Boulardii is the flag ship treatment against candida for autistic children ( go to Autism forums ) It is sold over the counter. It is also indicated as a preventive supplement for traveling diarrhea. It is used to treat Ulcerative Colitis.

    You are going to find a huge amount of information about it if you dig the web.

    Jorge.

    #101077

    dvjorge
    Participant
    Topics: 283
    Replies: 1369

    Tsunny;39576 wrote: http://www.kingbio.com/blog/aquaflora-better-than-ever/

    I am in agreement with the “Laws of Similiar” that likes cure likes. What would be wrong with something like this? There are the 9 strains of yeast in this. Is this something I can waste money on and give a try?

    No, don’t waste your money.

    There is nothing new for some us who has been fighting it for years. I have been 4 years reading and posting in candida forums and yahoo groups day by day.

    Aquaflora doesn’t work. The yeast strains you mention are DEAD cells. There are not alive candida cells in any product.

    They promote that product as immune booster against candida, but there is lack of proofs about that.

    Jorge.

    #101079

    jdib
    Member
    Topics: 5
    Replies: 23

    For the Nutricology it says 3 pills = 9 billion.

    So are you taking 3 pills in the morning and 3 at night? Are you taking with or without food?

    #101080

    Cheesey
    Member
    Topics: 37
    Replies: 245

    I went to a new ND today and she didn’t suggest anti-fungals, rather she is starting me on S. Boulardii! I hadn’t even mentioned it to her. She seemed to think it is the best method to oust candida along with proper nutrition and probiotics. After I have been using it for around 6 weeks (that’s my next appointment to review progress) she suggested only then would I maybe move onto a system anti-fungal such as SF722 or lauric acid.

    I’ll be sure to report back my experiences.

    #101081

    klips32
    Participant
    Topics: 65
    Replies: 183

    mygutleaks;39548 wrote: S. Boulardii messed me up big time. Gave me cold like symptoms – very runny nose, headache all day long, and broke my face out. I tried it for a week, and got a sinus infection. Proceed with caution, and don’t buy too much at once. I still have two unopened bottles in my fridge that will probably never be used.

    Same stuff happened to me after taking diflucan the first time, I don’t believe that your symptoms where the cause of s. boulardii, rather the c. albicans fighting off as well as die-off symptoms.

    #101104

    Able900
    Spectator
    Topics: 92
    Replies: 4811

    Some of you know that I believe in looking at both the pros and cons of any questionable supplement used in connection with a Candida; I feel the same way about a yeast probiotic.

    Pros and Cons of S. boulardii

    Saccharomyces Boulardii is described as a “probiotic yeast.”

    The most notable use of S. boulardii is a protective response to the flora (beneficial bacteria) when it is being attacked in situations such as rounds of antibiotics.

    S. boulardii is normally unaffected by antibiotics.

    S. Boulardii will normally reach its maximum state in about 3 days if taken orally, but is cleared from the intestines after 2 to 5 days if daily doses are not continued.

    S. boulardii is considered to be a ‘temporary resident’ of the intestines because once enough lactic-acid bacteria are added to
    the intestines, S. boulardii is easily replaced.

    After reading the above statement about this yeast probiotic being replaced by normal probiotics, the statement below makes sense as far as the biological abilities of S. boulardii: S. Boulardii can be taken beneficially in combination with lactic-acid producing probiotics such as lactobacilli and bifidobacteria, in fact, S. boulardii can actually be an aid in restoring the normal flora in the intestines. The reason it’s able to do this is due to its ability to assist in the production of short-chain fatty acid levels in the gut; short-chain fatty acids play a crucial role in the health of your intestines, colon, and the beneficial flora in these areas.

    All this aside, there are cases of S. boulardii managing to get into the bloodstream due to permeability of the intestines. This result of this ‘can be’ the same as any foods that do the same, meaning to create allergic reactions. There are even less cases of S. boulardii actually reaching the bloodstream of a person suffering from severe permeability of the intestinal wall lining and causing an infection in the bloodstream. And this is one of the problems I have with this yeast probiotic. The other problems I have is when a person takes such a product without doing proper research as far as the interactions with other supplements are concerned. The information below is a warning quoted from a website which markets S. boulardii.

    Quote:

    Safety
    The U.S. Food and Drug Administration does not strictly regulate herbs and supplements. There is no guarantee of strength, purity or safety of products, and effects may vary. You should always read product labels. If you have a medical condition, or are taking other drugs, herbs, or supplements, you should speak with a qualified healthcare provider before starting a new therapy. Consult a healthcare provider immediately if you experience side effects.

    Allergies
    Individuals with a known allergy or hypersensitivity to yeast, Saccharomyces boulardii, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, or other species in the Saccharomycetaceae family should avoid S. boulardii. Saccharomyces boulardii use may be associated with itching, urticaria (hives), and generalized skin eruptions.

    Side Effects and Warnings
    Saccharomyces boulardii has been generally well tolerated in human studies for treatment of various diarrhea disorders. Symptoms of Saccharomyces cerevisiae infection included septic shock in more than one patient and fever in another. Symptoms of sepsis (infection) included increased white blood cell count, abdominal meteorism (swelling from gas), and respiratory insufficiency. In general, contamination usually occurred in patients with an indwelling vascular catheter.

    • Constipation, increased thirst, flatulence (gas), and bloating have been associated with Saccharomyces boulardii use. Use cautiously in patients with constipation.

    • Saccharomyces boulardii fungemia (fungal infection) has occurred. Avoid in patients with a yeast infection. Symptoms included septic shock in some patients and fever in another. Symptoms of sepsis include white blood cell count increase, abdominal meteorism, and respiratory insufficiency.

    • Saccharomyces boulardii use may also cause Quincke’s edema (swelling) or increases or decreases in blood pressure when used with MAOIs.

    Pregnancy and Breastfeeding
    Saccharomyces boulardii is not recommended in pregnant or breastfeeding women due to a lack of available scientific evidence.

    Saccharomyces boulardii: Interactions with Drugs
    Antibiotic treatments may change gastrointestinal flora, subsequently increasing steady state levels of Saccharomyces boulardii in humans. According to various clinical trials, use of Saccharomyces boulardii in combination with antibiotics decreases the frequency and duration of diarrhea. Caution is also advised when taking Saccharomyces boulardii with other anti-diarrhea agents due to additive effects.
    • Use of antifungal agents may result in decreased efficacy of Saccharomyces boulardii.
    • Saccharomyces boulardii taken in combination with monoamine oxidase inhibitors (MAOIs) may lower blood pressure.
    Interactions with Herbs and Dietary Supplements
    • Concomitant antibiotic treatment with herbs or supplements may change gastrointestinal flora, subsequently increasing steady state levels of Saccharomyces boulardii in humans. According to various clinical trials, use of Saccharomyces boulardii in combination with antibiotics decreases the frequency and duration of diarrhea.
    • Caution is also advised when taking Saccharomyces boulardii with other anti-diarrhea herbs or supplements due to additive effects.
    • Use of antifungal herbs or supplements may result in decreased efficacy of Saccharomyces boulardii.
    • Saccharomyces boulardii taken in combination with herbs or supplements with monoamine oxidase inhibitor-like activity may lower blood pressure.”

    I can’t say that I’m against taking S. boulardii, but taking or not taking this probiotic should be a very personal decision, so before I decided to take this or any other yeast probiotic during a Candida infestation, I would certainly do a lot of research concerning my own Candida-related problems in connection with S. boulardii.

    Able

    #101114

    raster
    Participant
    Topics: 104
    Replies: 6838

    I am going to talk to my naturopath about it in a few weeks and why he doesn’t use it.

    Dvjorge: I am happy to hear you are making progress.

    I want to remind everything that the environment of Dvjorge’s body could be different than our own so we might have different results, etc. For instance, he already has done chelation, fecal transplant, etc. and has a long history of trying to treat candida. These other protocols or methods could be a factor in why he has such a good response. In other words, there might be different boats for different folks because we are all different.

    Despite this statement I feel that this is a positive development and we have talked about boulardii quite a bit on the forum in the past. If you have leaky gut, per able’s research, you might want to reconsider this method.

    -raster

    #101122

    mygutleaks
    Participant
    Topics: 47
    Replies: 166

    to answer your question Able.. I took molybdenum for a while, but only when needed. I eventually stopped, on most days, because my die-off had really subsided. I don’t think I needed any when taking the SB, so I probably did not take it during the week I was on SB. I feel like rather than die-off, it was more of an immune reaction to the SB. It made me feel worse than die-off from candida. It was a different type of headache, whereas die-off from candida (using Nystatin) was more heaviness in legs, lethargy, headache, but not a runny nose. After 7 days of using SB, I got a sinus infection that took several weeks to totally clear.

    I have read that in some cases, the body will attack yeasts like SB. I’ve always thought my Candida was different from others on this board, in that I have never really been super sick. I think my candida is/was mostly in my gut. My immune system is still functioning which kept it from going systemic. (It was in trying to treat my face breakouts from food, that I learned about candida.. actually from a doctor.) So perhaps this is why I react to SB, and others with systemic candida, may not. All you can do is try it. The brand I used was Kirkman Labs, 3B. Plus I tried Kombucha, but had the same reaction to it.

    #101125

    Cheesey
    Member
    Topics: 37
    Replies: 245

    This might be of interest to some: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2868213/

    The use of a living organism as therapy increases the potential risk in four general areas: transfer of antibiotic-resistance genes, translocation of the living organism from the intestine to other areas of the body, persistence in the intestines and the development of adverse reactions. The first three theorical concerns are of minimal impact on S. boulardii. Unlike other bacterial strains of probiotics, such as Enterococcus faecium and Lactobacillus rhamnosus, which have been shown to acquire antibiotic-resistance genes, S. boulardii has not developed any antibiotic or antifungal resistance[190,191]. Data from animal models shows reduced translocation with S. boulardii treatment[64,89], unlike other strains of S. cerevisiae[192]. As pharmacokinetic studies indicate, S. boulardii does not persist 3-5 d after oral ingestion is discontinued, so persistence is not a concern for this probiotic[118].

    S. boulardii has been used as a probiotic since the 1950s in Europe and has been investigated in clinical trials worldwide. Safety and adverse event data collected during clinical trials, when patients are closely monitored for problems associated with the investigational treatment, has documented a remarkable safety profile of S. boulardii in adults. A wide diversity of adult patients have been followed up who were either randomized to S. boulardii as part of a clinical trial or were documented in case series or case reports for various disease indications (TD, n = 1596; AAD, n = 958; adult acute diarrhea, 156; enteral tube feeding, n = 103; IBD, n = 66; IBS, n = 16, HIV-related diarrhea, n = 18 and giardia infections, n = 50). These studies provide safety data for a total of 2963 adult patients and the only adverse reactions associated with S. boulardii was thirst (in 5 patients) and constipation (in 8 patients) in a trial of patients with C. difficile infections[53]. No case of S. boulardii fungemia has been reported in these diverse patient populations enrolled in clinical trials.

    Infrequent cases of fungemia have been reported in case reports or case series in the literature. Most of the adult cases of S. boulardii fungemia are with serious co-morbidities and have central venous catheters. Most cases responded well to treatment with fluconazole or amphotericin B[193]. Some cases developed fungemia, not from the direct ingestion of S. boulardii probiotics, but acquired the yeast from contaminated environmental fomites[194]. Fungemia from S. cerevisiae (non-boulardii strains) have also been reported and are similar to S. boulardii cases, but have poorer prognosis[195,196]. A challenge to determining valid incidence of fungemia is the lack of available advanced yeast identification assays which can distinguish S. cerevisiae from S. boulardii.

    #101127

    dvjorge
    Participant
    Topics: 283
    Replies: 1369

    Cheesey;39628 wrote: This might be of interest to some: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2868213/

    The use of a living organism as therapy increases the potential risk in four general areas: transfer of antibiotic-resistance genes, translocation of the living organism from the intestine to other areas of the body, persistence in the intestines and the development of adverse reactions. The first three theorical concerns are of minimal impact on S. boulardii. Unlike other bacterial strains of probiotics, such as Enterococcus faecium and Lactobacillus rhamnosus, which have been shown to acquire antibiotic-resistance genes, S. boulardii has not developed any antibiotic or antifungal resistance[190,191]. Data from animal models shows reduced translocation with S. boulardii treatment[64,89], unlike other strains of S. cerevisiae[192]. As pharmacokinetic studies indicate, S. boulardii does not persist 3-5 d after oral ingestion is discontinued, so persistence is not a concern for this probiotic[118].

    S. boulardii has been used as a probiotic since the 1950s in Europe and has been investigated in clinical trials worldwide. Safety and adverse event data collected during clinical trials, when patients are closely monitored for problems associated with the investigational treatment, has documented a remarkable safety profile of S. boulardii in adults. A wide diversity of adult patients have been followed up who were either randomized to S. boulardii as part of a clinical trial or were documented in case series or case reports for various disease indications (TD, n = 1596; AAD, n = 958; adult acute diarrhea, 156; enteral tube feeding, n = 103; IBD, n = 66; IBS, n = 16, HIV-related diarrhea, n = 18 and giardia infections, n = 50). These studies provide safety data for a total of 2963 adult patients and the only adverse reactions associated with S. boulardii was thirst (in 5 patients) and constipation (in 8 patients) in a trial of patients with C. difficile infections[53]. No case of S. boulardii fungemia has been reported in these diverse patient populations enrolled in clinical trials.

    Infrequent cases of fungemia have been reported in case reports or case series in the literature. Most of the adult cases of S. boulardii fungemia are with serious co-morbidities and have central venous catheters. Most cases responded well to treatment with fluconazole or amphotericin B[193]. Some cases developed fungemia, not from the direct ingestion of S. boulardii probiotics, but acquired the yeast from contaminated environmental fomites[194]. Fungemia from S. cerevisiae (non-boulardii strains) have also been reported and are similar to S. boulardii cases, but have poorer prognosis[195,196]. A challenge to determining valid incidence of fungemia is the lack of available advanced yeast identification assays which can distinguish S. cerevisiae from S. boulardii.

    I read this abstract during my research about it. S. Boulardii is the most studied probiotic in the world. There are many papers about it.
    Personally, I have no concern about it.

    A yeast Allergic may happens if you have CRC. It is something to look at if you want to try it.

    Thanks for posting it.

    Jorge.

    #101149

    mygutleaks
    Participant
    Topics: 47
    Replies: 166

    hi Jorge,

    what is the difference between Candida-Related Complex and Systemic candida? I know Dr. Stoll talks a lot about CRC, but I haven’t seen it mentioned on too many other sites.

    Thanks,

    -MGL

    #101156

    dvjorge
    Participant
    Topics: 283
    Replies: 1369

    mygutleaks;39652 wrote: hi Jorge,

    what is the difference between Candida-Related Complex and Systemic candida? I know Dr. Stoll talks a lot about CRC, but I haven’t seen it mentioned on too many other sites.

    Thanks,

    -MGL

    First,

    Let me tell you I was a friend of him. I shared my knowledge about this syndrome with Dr. Walt in his bulletin board many times. If you dig the archives, you will find many of our debates about candida. Well, if the new administrator hasn’t erased them !. Walt signed one of his books for me before to send it to me. I own the two he wrote. Excellent books by one of the greatest Holistic MD ever.

    I know very well his thought about this syndrome, leaky gut, the 3LS, and more. It was really sad he passed away. I felt that hard since he always helped me.

    Anyway, CRC ( Candida Related Complex ) is a syndrome caused by an intestinal yeast overgrowth, sometimes genital too, and its metabolites affecting remote organs and functions.
    This is the reason why we all are here battling. This syndrome is wrongly called systemic candidiasis many times.

    Fungemia, Candidemia, or Systemic Candidiasis is when candida alive cells manage to enter the blood stream and infect the blood. This is a real emergency that only gives MDs hours to save the patient. It must be treated with powerful IV or oral antifungals.

    I am always battling to educate people about it. There should be a moment where candida websites and people stop calling CRC systemic candidiasis.

    Jorge.

    #101198

    mrs.candida
    Member
    Topics: 53
    Replies: 452

    I’m switching to S.Boulardii today. I have stopped my coconut oil, caprylic acid, and sf722. I plan to give this a try for a month. I need to get the enema bit figured out. I’ll be doing a lot of google research, but I just wanted to say to Jorge that the enema link he posted doesn’t work.

    After researching “high enemas” I don’t think I can do it. I’m really scared to try and push a hose into my transverse colon. Would colonics work the same? Also, if I did go the colonic route would once a week be enough?

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