Xylitol as an Antimocrobial?

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This topic contains 7 replies, has 3 voices, and was last updated by  raster 3 years, 7 months ago.

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  • #121377

    Lukey
    Member
    Topics: 10
    Replies: 67

    I was reading in the archives here and someone said it might kill off good bacteria, but has this been proven? I’ve sen many candida programs recommend it. I took 1/2 a tsp in water this AM and it caused quite a detox reaction.

    I’ve been taking Lactulose 1 tsp 2x daily with very good results, and I don’t really want to change that right now by adding something that’s going to hit me with severe Herx. Nor do I want to take anything that could kill the good bacteria that Lactulose is FINALLY seeming to be creating in my GI tract.
    I find it kind of amazing that mega dose GSE, oil of oregano, SF722, Coconut oil, etc., all caused ZERO die off, but 1/2 tsp of Xylitol caused very noticeable die off that kind of took the good out of my day today.
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    Bacterial Balance Issues

    Another potential concern is the effect that xylitol may have on the populations of good bacteria that normally live in healthy bodies. Xylitol has been proven to kill off harmful strains of bacteria in studies, but will it also kill off beneficial native ones like Lactobacillus and Bifidobacterium? According to Dr. Ellie Phillips, author of Kiss Your Dentist Goodbye, there have not been any specific studies done to investigate the long-term effects of xylitol consumption on intestinal flora. However, Dr. Phillips states that she has recommended xylitol to her patients for decades and seen only good overall health results when it is used in the appropriate amounts. According to Dr. Phillips, harmful acid-producing bacteria are uniquely attracted to and neutralized by xylitol, which allows good bacteria to thrive both in the mouth and, presumably, the gut. Of course, the advice given above about incorporating xylitol into your diet slowly and in moderation will let you evaluate how it affects your individual system and overall well-being, if you decide to use it.

    http://www.livinghealthy360.com/index.php/what-are-the-risks-and-dangers-of-xylitol-gum-mints-and-artificial-sweetener-5121/

    #121378

    Lukey
    Member
    Topics: 10
    Replies: 67

    Posted May 06 2009 1:33pm
    Hi Ellie,

    I was told by my acupuncturist that since Xylitol kills bacteria, it kills beneficial bacteria in the intestine as well. Is this true?

    Thank you so much,

    DP
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    Hi Diane,

    Xylitol has been used for over a hundred years, and during the 1940 it became generally used as table sugar during sugar shortages in Europe. The benefits of xylitol were actually noticed when people became healthier; children had fewer ear infections and dental disease reduced.
    Most holistic doctors recommend xylitol for health. For dental health you are looking for a total of only about a teaspoon each day – after meals.

    As for the actions of xylitol: only specific strains of mouth bacteria are affected by xylitol.
    These are the “intruder,” acid-producing, plaque producing bacteria, the ones that cause dental disease.

    When you consume xylitol, these intruder bacteria (ones that normally use sugar and make damaging acids) readily absorb xylitol. The xylitol binds their proteins and they can no longer make acids to damage teeth. They no longer produce sticky threads that allow them to layer and form plaque.

    Other strains of mouth bacteria are not affected by xylitol. They thrive and take the place of the harmful, acid-producing kind. These “xylitol-tolerant” bacteria do not form acids and do not form plaque. These protective bacteria coat teeth and protect them. In this way xylitol has acted as a pro-biotic to allow healthy mouth bacteria to grow in place of the acid-producing and damaging ones.

    People with acid reflux symptoms often find similar changes as acid symptoms disappear.

    I do not believe that there are long-term studies that address intestinal flora and xylitol use. Studies with high intake and children showed xylitol to be very well tolerated. I do know that 15 grams of xylitol is made naturally by the body each day.

    I have been recommending xylitol for decades. Used in the quantities that I recommend I have noticed only positive health reports – even from people who previously had suffered g-i problems of varying kinds. One doctor has a clinic for very sick patients -treating patients with no cures. Xylitol is the first thing he adds to their diet.

    If you are aware of the “eight health sugars” – or “glyconutrients” – you will know that xylose ( from which xylitol comes) is one of these sugars that supposedly helps cells communicate with each other. I am no expert in this field but over the past few years there is more discussion about this idea.

    I will link you to a body builder website where xylitol is discussed in more detail.
    http://www.bodybuilding.com/fun/xylitol.htm . It appears that those who consume xylitol are better able to preserve muscle and break down fat – something of benefit to athletes.

    I have no negative stories to report. The only negative ever has been that dogs should not consume quantities of xylitol. The reaction in dogs is different – just like many human foods.
    I hope this helps and I would be interested for more discussion if you have more questions.

    Thanks so much for your message,
    Ellie
    http://www.Zellies.com

    #121379

    raster
    Participant
    Topics: 104
    Replies: 6838

    One thing that could be happening is that you are allergic to xylitol and the reaction you are experiencing (herxheimer) is the same symptoms as die-off. Allergic reactions and die-off have very similar symptoms for me and most people.

    -raster

    #121380

    Lukey
    Member
    Topics: 10
    Replies: 67

    I’m quite sure it’s die off, not allergy.
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    Xylitol is awesome on a candida diet. If you are going low carb for a while to starve yeast and candida, and you get lots of Sugar cravings, eat a spoonful of xylitol, your cravings will be gone for a long time and the yeast feed off the sugar and die because they can’t process it, as too much for a human can cause low blood sugar, too low blood sugar and you can die, so little yeasty has no food and basically by consuming xylitol they starve to death. Xylitol helps with bowel movements and it also helps clear up eczema caused by candida. for the first few days to a week you may be slightly gassy and mild stomach upsets even on a spoonful, but your body will come accustomed to it, and you’ll be fine there after.

    #121385

    Lukey
    Member
    Topics: 10
    Replies: 67

    I took 1 whole tsp of Xylitol today, plus I coat my teeth with it 3-4x a day.
    I felt die off today, but not as bad as yesterday. In a few days I increase to 1 tsp, 2x a day.

    I’m also going to ask my MD if he will let me take Lactulose for as long as I want to and I keep seeing results from it.

    Xylitol has done wonders for some people. I just might become one of them.

    #121404

    Lukey
    Member
    Topics: 10
    Replies: 67

    Amazing that some people who participated in other threads relating to Xylitol do not participate in this one. I guess some people just aren’t too friendly, or are a little weird, or something.
    I guess some people don’t care if others get any info or not.

    #171677

    Renee
    Participant
    Topics: 0
    Replies: 1

    I drank about 40 grams of xylitol in juice. I’m not totally sure it was 40 grams, but I don’t think that’s too far off as an estimate. Maybe a little more, maybe a little less, but about that much. I’m not used to xylitol and didn’t know there were side effects. As soon as I had finished the juice, I didn’t feel too well, and it kept getting worse. After a couple hours I felt like throwing up, had stomach pain, intestinal cramping, diarrhea, nausea. So I looked it up and found out that the amount I had is known to cause such side effects.

    I read that charcoal wasn’t really effective to reverse xylitol toxicity in dogs, but I decided to try it anyway. I mixed a couple tsp of activated charcoal in some juice (WITHOUT xylitol!) and IMMEDIATELY started to feel better.

    I also became itchy and felt like my hands and face had a rash all over. You couldn’t see it, but I could feel it, and it was painful. Another thing about the overdose is that it dehydrated my body and I would have gotten a bad dehydration headache, too, if I hadn’t been drinking enough water.

    I know that some good things can cause a die-off reaction … like kombucha. First time I had that stuff I didn’t know it could cause die-off, so I drank quite a bit. And suffered from it! I found out through that that one should start off with small amounts to avoid the major die-off.

    However, with xylitol, I have a hard time believing this is a die-off reaction and xylitol is good and healthy. It isn’t sugar, but it’s a sugar alcohol. I’ve been wary of it for years as a corn derivative and all that stuff. This was my first time to actually have it in something other than the occasional piece of xylitol gum or candy. And now you won’t be getting me to try it again anytime soon. 🙂 I’m not opposed to a little bit in gum or candy here and there, but I’m NOT planning to try another accidental OD again!!

    If anyone does OD on xylitol, try activated charcoal (but do it sooner than I did, to save yourself a little misery). Xylitol pulls water from your body into your intestines, so be sure to drink plenty of water, preferably sip by sip (drinking too much at once can make diarrhea worse).

    #171678

    raster
    Participant
    Topics: 104
    Replies: 6838

    Well I do think it is anti-microbial because I actually have xylitol in my toothpaste and it neutralizes acids in my mouth. This toothpaste is best after coffee because it won’t make your teeth feel like crap. It also seems to kill some of the mouth bugs I have in my mouth.

    -raster

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