Will a be able to eat grains (brown rice) and sweet potatoes again every day?

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This topic contains 9 replies, has 5 voices, and was last updated by  Candida90 4 years, 2 months ago.

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  • #171157

    alpha222
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    Topics: 9
    Replies: 2

    Hello. I´m a personal trainer, a body combant teacher and a dancer. I was diagnosted with candida and I started a candida diet but it made me so weak that i find so difficult to teach classes and dance. My question is: will i be able to eat some grains like brown rice or sweet potatoes( like 2 or 3 per day) everyday in the future?

    #171159

    Rabelais
    Blocked
    Topics: 3
    Replies: 268

     

    Some questions.

    First question:
    Who diagnosed you with candida? I don’t intend to sound blunt or rude, but the unfortunate fact is that there exist too many self-proclaimed experts who blame lots of things on candida. They can easily prove that you really have candida, because everyone has candida. Therefore, it’s important that your diagnosis can be trusted – which is why I’m asking, hoping not to offend you.

    Second question:
    Where is the candida? Skin, gut, colon, pharynx, mouth, somewhere else?

    Third question:
    You seem to go for the candida diet which forbids sugars and carbs. This diet might be okay for much of the population, who either spend their days sitting in a chair and staring at a computer screen, or playing couch potato on the sofa. Those who are physically active, though, do need energy. As long as you make sure you get sufficient fibres, minerals, antioxidants and stuff, energy-rich food like sugars and carbs is a good thing – but only if your activity is high enough to burn that energy. From your description, I understand that you burn a lot of calories each day. So you need that energy! No wonder you feel weak, you are now starving yourself! I bet you’re losing weight already! Take care to avoid muscle atrophy! So my question really is: why do you cut down on the energy if your body needs that energy?

    Rabelais

     

    #171161

    EthanT
    Participant
    Topics: 4
    Replies: 17

    Hello Rabelais,

    You touch on a point I was wondering about recently.  I am also on the Candida Diet (well, I haven’t been super strict about it, but pretty good).  But, I like backpacking and mountain climbing – activities that burn a tremendous amount of energy.  It’s been very difficult to plan a low-sugar diet for when I do this, and a no-sugar diet is just impossible.

    However, exercise seems to take away many of the drawbacks of fructose, which lead to fatty liver, diabetes, obesity, etc, by burning it up right away and using it all for energy.

    But I have wondered if the same applies to Candida.  Since this is a highly aggressive and efficient yeast, what stops the yeast from eating much of the sugar (or at least enough to make it much harder to defeat it) before my body can burn it off, whether I’m exercising, or not?

    Any thoughts on that?  I’d love to hear that exercise steals the sugar/carbs from the yeast, then I can feel less guilty next time I go on a trip!  😉    Any sources or references, as well?

    #171166

    Sanshou
    Participant
    Topics: 6
    Replies: 47

    From my experience there is a limit to what you can eat and how much. Some of the more problematic foods like white grains, sugars, rice, etc may give you more issues if you try to consume them regularly even being highly active.

    I’m pretty active myself I can often burn 1k calories or more just riding to the beach to surf. What I try to do is keep a base diet similar to the candida diet which I know doesn’t effect my symptoms and can maintain weight. I have some minor variance from the base diet like lentils, kefir/yogurt, eggs, chocolate, etc

    Cheap “white” processed or heavy starch foods tend to give me more issues so when I do eat them I give myself a few days for it to pass through my system before adding more, as it seems to digest more slowly. I tend to compensate this lack of fuel in two ways by using friendlier foods on alternate days like coconut flour or periodically oats and using fats, which are another good fuel source. So I may alternate one day with dirty chocolate or yogurt/kefir ice/pies, the next day it may be oatmeal then the day after pizza, then back to a fat, etc. With the goal of keeping a variety and not just loading up on just carbs and giving them time to pass before loading up on more.

    I found if you can reduce the sugar load you can often get away with eating more of these problem foods like dairy or grains. And to do this I cook meals and treats myself “lots of freezer foods involved” and I use a lot of different fermented foods, keeping in mind that different vegetable ferments offers more bacteria/yeast culture diversity. More recently I’ve been learning tricks in food preparation to reduce that sugar load. For instance uncooked potatoes don’t contain near as much bad starch or if you add coconut oil “3%” in boiling water before adding rice then storing in fridge for 8 hours it will reduce nearly 50% of the calories or starches. The same with oatmeal, if soaked over night and eaten raw it contains more resistant starches and less that spike sugar levels.

    So basically what I’ve found is it helps to cheat, and don’t forget the root diet and just try to find some kind of balance.

    #171170

    Rabelais
    Blocked
    Topics: 3
    Replies: 268

     

    Hi EthanT,

    I can imagine you have a hard time cutting back on your energy consumption when you are so physically active. You are right that those who exercise regularly (as in: at least one hour a day of strongly increased heart rate and strongly increased respiration frequency) do not experience the disadvantages of a high-energy diet that most Americans experience.

    The explanation is the lifestyle. If you have a largely sedentive lifestyle, it’s important to cut back on your energy intake. If you don’t, you’ll gain weight and you’ll have liver and heart problems, among other things.

    But if you’re as physically active as you are, there’s no evidence that a high energy intake does any harm. You even need all that energy!

    A fine example is the Kenian Kalenjin tribe. Members of this tribe often appear at the top of runner’s lists. Running is in their genes, so to say.

    The Kalenjin consume 100 grams or more of pure sugar each day, most of it in their extremely sweet tea. That’s pure horror to most western diet advisors – but the Kalenjin thrive on it. Because they not only consume the energy, they burn it too. Candida is, to my knowledge, unknown to them.

    Candida is said to be sugar-hungry. But that’s true for almost all bacteria in our gut! Almost every living cell uses sugar for energy. This includes all of our gut bacteria, the cells of our own body, your dog’s cells, the leaves of the trees in your street – and yes, also the candida cells.

    Is a diet a solution that combats, or even only hinders, candida? Many say so – but frankly, I doubt it.

    First, all cells and all gut bacteria thrive on sugar.

    Second, sugar is so easily absorbed, most of it doesn’t even reach the colon.

    Third, there’s this theory that candida on the skin, or around your genitals, thrives on sugar. I have my doubts. You may try it if you like: eat a lot of sugar, wait 20 minutes or so for the sugar to reach your bloodstream, then lick your skin. Does it taste sweet? No? Then there’s NO sugar on your skin!

    (Same for your genitals, but… ehm… well, let’s not go into that subject.)

    Rabelais

     

    #171172

    Rabelais
    Blocked
    Topics: 3
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    Hi Sanshou,

    I like your reasoning!

    I think your “rotational diet” is a good idea. It makes sure you get all the different kinds of nutrients you need. And this rotating cuts back a bit on your energy intake.

    Frankly, I don’t think this rotating is necessary per se. It’s what we might call the “side effects” that benefit you. One side effect is that you make sure to eat lots of different nutrients. Another side effect is that you automatically reduce your sugar intake. And, of course, a very important effect is that eating something different each day is much more fun than eating similar things each day.

    So, basically, your idea is very good for a healthy lifestyle! Keep up the good work!

    Rabelais

     

    #171173

    EthanT
    Participant
    Topics: 4
    Replies: 17

    Hello Rabelais,

    Thank you for the very informative reply!  This was very helpful.  Also hearing what Sanshou said, as well, both of your responses are making me think I can stress a little less about meals on my trips!

    #171175

    Sanshou
    Participant
    Topics: 6
    Replies: 47

    Hey Rabelais and thanks.

    I think you may be correct and it may not be necessary for most people to rotate extra calories like I do with fats, carbs, etc. But I was following a extremely low carb diet for so long I think it may just take time for my gut to readjust to the changes. As currently when I don’t rotate I seem to run into a few digestion issues, but I think given more time it may correct itself.

    #171176

    Rabelais
    Blocked
    Topics: 3
    Replies: 268

     

    Hi Ethan,

    For me, my digestion is always better when I’m not stressing. So stressless trips will help you anyway, with or without additional measures. Which is, of course, a good thing!

    Sanshou,

    Sure, readjusting takes some time. It’s a known fact that the diversity of your gut flora adjusts to what you eat, so give those fellows some time to adjust too!  😉

    Regardless, even if you don’t know exactly why rotating helps you, if that’s your personal experience, then by all means do continue! For you it helps your digestion, and it’s one more way to ensure you eat different types of nutrients during the week, which is good too.

    Rabelais

     

    #171181

    Candida90
    Participant
    Topics: 1
    Replies: 7

    You can eat brown rice if you have candida. Some people had to stop eating it, but lots of people ate it and managed to get rid of their candida overgrowth.

    When you’ll have flushed out the candida out of your body you can eat whatever you want

     

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