why isn't goats cheese on the diet?

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This topic contains 9 replies, has 6 voices, and was last updated by  helpme 7 years, 3 months ago.

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  • #73783

    helpme
    Member
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    just a question, seeing as it contains no sugars

    #73785

    Able900
    Spectator
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    helpme wrote: just a question, seeing as it contains no sugars

    As long as the cheese is fermented long enough, one probably wouldn’t need to worry about the small amounts of lactose that are in the cheese. The flora should ferment the lactose, changing it to a lactic acid form, that is, providing it’s fermented long enough.
    Even so, if I wanted to eat it on the diet, I would do so only after the first 3 or 4 weeks and start with a very small amount watching for a reaction of any type.

    It isn’t on the diet because it presents a potential problem for many sufferers. However, in the end, the decision should be yours and not ours. It’s not like we’re forbidding you to eat anything that’s not on the diet.

    Able

    #73786

    helpme
    Member
    Topics: 45
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    Ok thank you, I’ll give it a try next week

    #73917

    HAIRDRESSER
    Member
    Topics: 2
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    Can I have a little more info about goat cheese..what is the difference between it and anyother cheese?

    #73935

    Lauren
    Member
    Topics: 44
    Replies: 267

    Hairdesser,
    Goat cheese is made from goat milk instead of cows milk. This is great for many people with allergies or sensitives to cow milk, like me. Based on information I have gotten from different doctors some people might have a sensitivity to cow milk because the casein found in it. Usually people with casein problems also have gluten problems. This is because the body breaks down gluten and casein in a similar way. There molecular model is similar. So if you are having a hard time breaking down gluten you are likely to have a problem with dairy. This is why people who have gluten sensitivities tend to have dairy sensitivities too.

    Other people can’t have any cow milk products, even with the casein taken out of it. For these people even a product like ghee is not helpful. The hardest part is finding out which type of sensitivity you have. The best thing to do is to test it. If you have a gluten intolerance it is more likely a casein issue, but not always. For me personally I am in the process of figuring out my own dairy sensitivity issue by trying ghee. I have a gluten problem so I was thinking it was just a casein thing. However, I believe (but am not certain yet) that any type of cow milk product is bad for me. I need to test it again to make sure this is true though.

    This is information that I gathered from doctors over the years and I wanted to share for anyone else out there that might have gluten and dairy problems. This is just information I remember understanding when the doctors explained it to me or I read it somewhere. So if there is any wrong info I am sorry.

    Here is a link about goat cheese http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Goat_cheese
    Here is a link about ghee http://www.pureindianfoods.com/

    #73962

    Munoz
    Member
    Topics: 29
    Replies: 32

    Hello everybody, about cheese my weak side…I have been eating ‘farmers cheese’ like 1 oz a day. that was well after 2 months in the strict diet. If someone interested in the brand I will get it.

    #73966

    raster
    Participant
    Topics: 104
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    Cheeses contain molds and this is the main reason we don’t suggest any cheeses on the diet.

    -raster

    #74087

    helpme
    Member
    Topics: 45
    Replies: 72

    if the cheese is relatively ‘fresh’ would that amount of mold be a problem though?

    #74088

    Able900
    Spectator
    Topics: 92
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    helpme wrote: if the cheese is relatively ‘fresh’ would that amount of mold be a problem though?

    None of the experts have personally lab-tested cheese to obtain the mold count at various stages of fermentation, and neither have we read any possibly existing research on this. We only know that it’s possible for cheese to contain mold. In cases such as this, if a member wishes to eat the product and believes it would be safe, the only thing left to do is to test the food yourself in small amounts.

    Able

    #74092

    helpme
    Member
    Topics: 45
    Replies: 72

    Thanks for your input guys, I think I’ll keep it off the list for a while

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