why is meat limited?

Home The Candida Forum Candida Questions why is meat limited?

This topic contains 11 replies, has 8 voices, and was last updated by  Vegan Catlady 5 years, 1 month ago.

Viewing 12 posts - 1 through 12 (of 12 total)
  • Author
    Posts
  • #115415

    dusty
    Member
    Topics: 6
    Replies: 3

    ive just started the lisa richards diet, i dont really understand why meat is limited to 3X a week does anyone know, is it due to the acidity. It would just be way easier if i could eat meat everyday- i’d live on stirfry, any input would be great
    thanks

    #115416

    Tdog333
    Member
    Topics: 25
    Replies: 245

    From my understanding beef takes a couple days to digest and causes constipation. Also the fact that most meats can contain parasites unless you REALLY cook them well. And if you cook it really well it denatures the proteins which can gunk up your body. Unless you get it free range/organic it will also contain antibiotics which are pretty detrimental if you are trying to regrow your beneficial bacteria. Most fish contains high levels of mercury as well.

    I don’t eat it at all anymore, which kinda sucks because meat is quite tasty in my opinion.

    There are a few more things I’ve heard about meat as well but until I see real proof I won’t mention them.

    #115435

    Floggi
    Member
    Topics: 1
    Replies: 425


    Can you explain why denaturation of proteins would be a problem?

    Any protein denatures at high temperatures; “high” starts already at around 42 °C for many proteins. (I don’t know what 42 °C is in °F; it’s roughly about 9 °F above body temperature, so you do the calculation now 😉 ).

    Cooking or steaming vegetables will therefore also denature the proteins.

    About antibiotics, is that really a problem in the USA? Over here, we do have our antibiotics problems too, but not in any meat that’s for sale through any of the regular channels.

    #115438

    Tdog333
    Member
    Topics: 25
    Replies: 245

    Floggi;53956 wrote:
    Can you explain why denaturation of proteins would be a problem?

    Any protein denatures at high temperatures; “high” starts already at around 42 °C for many proteins. (I don’t know what 42 °C is in °F; it’s roughly about 9 °F above body temperature, so you do the calculation now 😉 ).

    Cooking or steaming vegetables will therefore also denature the proteins.

    About antibiotics, is that really a problem in the USA? Over here, we do have our antibiotics problems too, but not in any meat that’s for sale through any of the regular channels.

    Meat is absolutely loaded with antibiotics in the USA. It used to be regulated, but no longer.

    The current figure is that 80% of antibiotics in the USA go into our meat.

    This website explains it pretty well:
    http://www.ecologos.org/denature.htm

    “The fact that meat-eaters’ feces have offensive, and highly-characteristic, odors in the form of toxic amines, such as indole, skatol, indican, putrescine [NH2(CH2)4NH2], and cadaverine [NH2(CH2)5NH2] (all from tryptophan), neurine, and ptomatropine, is clear evidence that their proteins were not digested properly, for if they had been, there would be no amines, or residual nitrogen, for the putrefactive bacteria in the colon to metabolize to produce these odors. Properly digested proteins would produce no offensive amine compounds, since all the protein would have been digested to amino acids which are absorbed into the body, leaving none in the colon to support the putrefactive bacteria.
    “As the diet changes, the intestinal flora also changes. Gram negative anaerobes are observed when meat is introduced into the diet. Persons who consume meat exhibit proportionately higher numbers of Bacteroides and other gram negative anaerobes in comparison with those on a vegetarian diet.” Thus, as in all ecosystems, the species that predominate are a direct function of the foods available.
    In addition to denaturing, the high temperatures of cooking causes cross-linking of some proteins, which makes them hard, such as eggs or breads getting harder on cooking, and that also profoundly reduces or eliminates the ability of these proteins to be properly digested.”

    Just a few excerpts. Most people with candida already have severely impaired digestion, I’m assuming the tests they did were on normal healthy individuals. So you can imagine how much worse it would be with someone already struggling to digest foods.

    #115439

    raster
    Participant
    Topics: 104
    Replies: 6838

    Some people may need more meat than recommended, especially if you have nutritional or mineral deficiencies. Fish likely wouldn’t set you back very much if you haven’t consumed much of it in the past. I would not consume any beef or pork on the diet whatsoever because it takes a long time to digest.

    -raster

    #115452

    Danny33
    Member
    Topics: 25
    Replies: 362

    dusty;53936 wrote: ive just started the lisa richards diet, i dont really understand why meat is limited to 3X a week does anyone know, is it due to the acidity. It would just be way easier if i could eat meat everyday- i’d live on stirfry, any input would be great
    thanks

    I see no reason to limit your intake of quality meats unless you are experiencing adverse effects from them. I eat meat everyday with 0 problems, including beef and pork. Always anti-biotic free.

    If what you’re doing is currently is working, then by all means keep the meat to a minimum. But if you feel you need more, try more.

    -D

    #115480

    jameskep
    Participant
    Topics: 25
    Replies: 220

    Depends on the cut and processing/curing of the meat as well. I can handle ground beef much easier than a steak. The same with pork. I can do ground pork but have trouble with a pork steak. The ground meats seem to be easier to digest than the whole cut. Chicken and fish seem to be less constipating/easier to digest than Red meat/pork. Also, the more tender the meat is the easier it is to digest. Just depends on the individuals digestion/gut make up. Find out what works for you.

    #115484

    Vegan Catlady
    Member
    Topics: 34
    Replies: 626

    Quite a few people on this forum feel strongly about avoiding a pharmaceutical anti-fungal if at all possible.

    If you were someone who was not battling a bad case of candida, I cant see why meat is not allowed.

    When battling a bad case, or a chronic case, I would definitely avoid meat at all costs.

    Processing protein (beyond 10% of your total calories) works the kidneys. Its why people in hospitals have low protein meals until they heal, they dont need to tax an already taxed organ. Especially if you happen to be dealing with any die-off.

    Meat slows the elimination process a bit. You tend to “go” once a day, instead of several times a day.
    Candida can slow elimination. Meat could make that much worse.
    I know people who sometimes dont go at all in a day!

    Here is an article drama-queen-style but quoting different doctors on the importance of WHAT goes through our bowels.

    enjoy.lol.

    http://modernmanna.org/categories/Health-Articles/Autointoxication-%252d-A-Major-Cause-of-Disease/

    #115489

    jameskep
    Participant
    Topics: 25
    Replies: 220

    I don’t agree with her on the part that oils/fats can turn rancid right away. She makes it sound like if the oils and fats are not processed within a very short period of time that they can go rancid in the body. For example, coconut oil and olive oil would have to sit in the gut for god knows how long before they turn rancid. Most/almost all of the good fats and oils consumed get digested and utilized before they can turn rancid. I think what she might mean is that people are consuming too many bad oils to begin with— hydrogenated oils, overheated vegetable oil, over fried fat/oil etc…

    #115491

    Tdog333
    Member
    Topics: 25
    Replies: 245

    jameskep;54010 wrote: I don’t agree with her on the part that oils/fats can turn rancid right away. She makes it sound like if the oils and fats are not processed within a very short period of time that they can go rancid in the body. For example, coconut oil and olive oil would have to sit in the gut for god knows how long before they turn rancid. Most/almost all of the good fats and oils consumed get digested and utilized before they can turn rancid. I think what she might mean is that people are consuming too many bad oils to begin with— hydrogenated oils, overheated vegetable oil, over fried fat/oil etc…

    agreed, if it can stay stable on the shelf for 2 years I don’t see it rotting within a few hours in the body.

    #115500

    lbrenner800
    Member
    Topics: 19
    Replies: 8

    Protein is important for healing the gut, but it should of course comprise a much smaller part of your diet than veggies and fats

    #115501

    Vegan Catlady
    Member
    Topics: 34
    Replies: 626

    I didnt see where the author mentioned coconut oil, but any oil in a sterile bottle on the shelf has to be a different scenario than in your body full of candida and bacteria,among other things….no?

Viewing 12 posts - 1 through 12 (of 12 total)

The topic ‘why is meat limited?’ is closed to new replies.