When can I add carbs like quinoa and millet?

Home The Candida Forum Candida Questions When can I add carbs like quinoa and millet?

This topic contains 20 replies, has 6 voices, and was last updated by  Banshee 2 years, 9 months ago.

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  • #173211

    tomtensfarfar
    Participant
    Topics: 5
    Replies: 16

    Hi.
    I’m currently eating:
    Eggs
    Chicken
    Beef
    Broccoli
    Almonds
    Coconut flakes
    Lemon on bottle

    and that’s about it. I really miss the carbs, but I’m gonna stick with it for as long as needed. I’ve been on this diet for 9 days now, how do I know when it’s OK to add quinoa?

    #173212

    Jaumeb
    Participant
    Topics: 1
    Replies: 148

    I think you should already try small amounts and see what happens.

    #173213

    raster
    Participant
    Topics: 104
    Replies: 6838

    This is not a no carb diet. The beef isn’t on the diet fyi because it causes constipation and takes up to 2-3 days to digest whereas chicken and fish take hours to digest.

    -raster

    #173214

    tomtensfarfar
    Participant
    Topics: 5
    Replies: 16

    I know it’s not a no carb diet but the first stage includes very small amounts of carbs. I read on thecandidadiet that beef was OK so dunno what to trust :).

    #173215

    tomtensfarfar
    Participant
    Topics: 5
    Replies: 16

    I think you should already try small amounts and see what happens.

    Thanks for replying. What’s considered a low dose? 50g?

    #173216

    Jaumeb
    Participant
    Topics: 1
    Replies: 148

    Start with 50g and keep increasing as long as there is no negative reaction.

    #173217

    tomtensfarfar
    Participant
    Topics: 5
    Replies: 16

    Start with 50g and keep increasing as long as there is no negative reaction.

    Thanks, I’ll do that.

    #173223

    Banshee
    Participant
    Topics: 8
    Replies: 40

    I’ve personally tolerated both millet and buckwheat equally well since the beginning of the diet, eating a cup of either a day. I don’t suggest eating their flours or noodles at this stage – it’s easy to overdo.

    Quinoa, on the other hand, I found harder to digest and only eat occasionally after starting the second stage of the diet.

    Other carbs I reintroduced then were well-cooked beans, winter squashes and sweet potatoes. I also increased to two one-cup servings of safe starches a day.

    Just my experience and two-cents.

    #173224

    RobyRob
    Participant
    Topics: 2
    Replies: 55

    It’s your choice. The less carbs you eat, the less you feed candida. Know that this condition is apparently not curable.

    #173226

    tomtensfarfar
    Participant
    Topics: 5
    Replies: 16

    It’s your choice. The less carbs you eat, the less you feed candida. Know that this condition is apparently not curable.

    Due to unknown reasons I was bedridden with no appetite for several days, so I had to resort to some trusty carbs to fill my stomach. Gonna eat some more quinoa for 2 more weeks, by that time I’ve been gluten and milk free which should tell me if I can add yogurt and butter to the diet.

    I really tried to make my taste buds accept olive oil but since I recently got psoriasis and probably also psoriatic arthritis my willpower is way too low for that. Need some fat that doesn’t cost me a fortune and which I know I like.

    Thanks for the reply.

    #173227

    tomtensfarfar
    Participant
    Topics: 5
    Replies: 16

    I’ve personally tolerated both millet and buckwheat equally well since the beginning of the diet, eating a cup of either a day. I don’t suggest eating their flours or noodles at this stage – it’s easy to overdo.
    Quinoa, on the other hand, I found harder to digest and only eat occasionally after starting the second stage of the diet.
    Other carbs I reintroduced then were well-cooked beans, winter squashes and sweet potatoes. I also increased to two one-cup servings of safe starches a day.
    Just my experience and two-cents.

    Thanks for posting. When you say harder to digest, in what way do you notice that?

    #173249

    JohnnieJones
    Participant
    Topics: 0
    Replies: 2

    Thanks for sharing

    #173251

    raster
    Participant
    Topics: 104
    Replies: 6838

    The yeast is going to live on your diet if you eat carbs or not…it simply adjusts to whatever is in your diet and thrives on that. Starving out the yeast is very difficult if not impossible because if we killed all of the candida in our bodies, we would die. We need candida to survive.

    “Pathogenicity and virulence are emergent properties, meaning that they cannot be predicted directly from the properties of the microorganism. The environment, an individual host or population of hosts and/or an individual microbe or population of microbes can change independently, or as a function of complex interactions, including those between environment and host, host and microbe, microbe and environment, and all three. Thus, microbial pathogenicity is intrinsically unpredictable. Host and microbial characteristics are subject to predictable and unpredictable changes prompted by known, unknown, and random environmental, immunological, and other factors. Thus, as it is an outcome of host-microbe interaction whereby each entity is subject to independent and dependent changes at any point in time, pathogenicity is an emergent property.”

    “Too many people view Candida independent of the body and its function, needs and abilities. The area of diet and carbohydrates are a good example of this. Based on Dr. Truss’ dietary protocol, many people are overly emphatic about eliminating all carbohydrates. That isn’t to say that there isn’t good evidence supporting reducing Candida’s access to simple sugars, but on the whole, this approach creates other limitations.

    Most candida sites emphasize eliminating all carbohydrates. The rationale for this is that fungi thrive on carbohydrates. However, most complex carbohydrates are broken down into monosaccharides, which are absorbed in the proximal jejunum, leaving the rest of the intestinal tract with a possible small ratio of ingested sugar as lactulose in lactase enzyme deficient individuals. In other words, our body’s own cells absorb sugars quite quickly and effectively, something few people seem to consider. Diabetics and people with blood sugar regulation issues, such as hypoglycemia and insulin-resistance, absorb less sugar causing higher levels of sugar to remain in the blood stream and tissues. The incidence of fungal candida infections is higher in diabetics. On the other hand, people without blood sugar issues could be expected to do fine with some carbs on a candida diet, regardless of how much candida is in their body.

    Candida is commonly associated with chronic intestinal inflammatory diseases such as IBS, IBD, Chrohn’s, Leaky Gut, and Colitis. In fact, candida uses inflammation to help it spread throughout the body. A low carbohydrate diet can be detrimental for the intestinal lining because of reduced production of Short Chain Fatty Acids (SCFA) by cells in the colon. SCFA, such as butyrate, are responsible for maintaining the health of the intestinal cells and decreasing inflammation.”

    https://www.candidaplan.com/637/candida-diets-part-iv-sugars/

    #173252

    tomtensfarfar
    Participant
    Topics: 5
    Replies: 16

    The yeast is going to live on your diet if you eat carbs or not…it simply adjusts to whatever is in your diet and thrives on that. Starving out the yeast is very difficult if not impossible because if we killed all of the candida in our bodies, we would die. We need candida to survive.
    “Pathogenicity and virulence are emergent properties, meaning that they cannot be predicted directly from the properties of the microorganism. The environment, an individual host or population of hosts and/or an individual microbe or population of microbes can change independently, or as a function of complex interactions, including those between environment and host, host and microbe, microbe and environment, and all three. Thus, microbial pathogenicity is intrinsically unpredictable. Host and microbial characteristics are subject to predictable and unpredictable changes prompted by known, unknown, and random environmental, immunological, and other factors. Thus, as it is an outcome of host-microbe interaction whereby each entity is subject to independent and dependent changes at any point in time, pathogenicity is an emergent property.”
    “Too many people view Candida independent of the body and its function, needs and abilities. The area of diet and carbohydrates are a good example of this. Based on Dr. Truss’ dietary protocol, many people are overly emphatic about eliminating all carbohydrates. That isn’t to say that there isn’t good evidence supporting reducing Candida’s access to simple sugars, but on the whole, this approach creates other limitations.
    Most candida sites emphasize eliminating all carbohydrates. The rationale for this is that fungi thrive on carbohydrates. However, most complex carbohydrates are broken down into monosaccharides, which are absorbed in the proximal jejunum, leaving the rest of the intestinal tract with a possible small ratio of ingested sugar as lactulose in lactase enzyme deficient individuals. In other words, our body’s own cells absorb sugars quite quickly and effectively, something few people seem to consider. Diabetics and people with blood sugar regulation issues, such as hypoglycemia and insulin-resistance, absorb less sugar causing higher levels of sugar to remain in the blood stream and tissues. The incidence of fungal candida infections is higher in diabetics. On the other hand, people without blood sugar issues could be expected to do fine with some carbs on a candida diet, regardless of how much candida is in their body.
    Candida is commonly associated with chronic intestinal inflammatory diseases such as IBS, IBD, Chrohn’s, Leaky Gut, and Colitis. In fact, candida uses inflammation to help it spread throughout the body. A low carbohydrate diet can be detrimental for the intestinal lining because of reduced production of Short Chain Fatty Acids (SCFA) by cells in the colon. SCFA, such as butyrate, are responsible for maintaining the health of the intestinal cells and decreasing inflammation.”

    Candida Diets: Part IV: Sugars

    <iframe class=”wp-embedded-content” sandbox=”allow-scripts” security=”restricted” src=”https://www.candidplan.com/637/candida-diets-part-iv-sugars/embed/#?secret=Vi5XLfzNGQ” data-secret=”Vi5XLfzNGQ” width=”500″ height=”390″ title=”“Candida Diets: Part IV: Sugars” — The Candida Plan” frameborder=”0″ marginwidth=”0″ marginheight=”0″ scrolling=”no”></iframe>

    Yeah, but an overgrowth creates a bunch of health issues so I’m trying to get that addressed. Been checking out the candida plan and he seems to know what he’s talking about, so I’ll give that a try.

    #173257

    Banshee
    Participant
    Topics: 8
    Replies: 40

    I’ve personally tolerated both millet and buckwheat equally well since the beginning of the diet, eating a cup of either a day. I don’t suggest eating their flours or noodles at this stage – it’s easy to overdo. Quinoa, on the other hand, I found harder to digest and only eat occasionally after starting the second stage of the diet. Other carbs I reintroduced then were well-cooked beans, winter squashes and sweet potatoes. I also increased to two one-cup servings of safe starches a day. Just my experience and two-cents.

    Thanks for posting. When you say harder to digest, in what way do you notice that?

    It would often be expelled whole. My digestion was pretty weak at the time, so this may be less of an issue for you.

    Millet and buckwheat are both prebiotic, which is an added benefit.

    I would start with 1/2 cup a day, then increase to 1 cup after a few days if it seems to agree with you.

    In time, you may be able to tolerate more per day, but I suggest spreading it out (don’t eat 2 cups in one sitting).

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