use of glutathione regulary?

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This topic contains 4 replies, has 4 voices, and was last updated by  ThomasJoel2 5 years, 2 months ago.

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  • #118685

    klips32
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    anti oxidants like ALA are not recommended to take without a agents like DMPS or DMSA. But how is it with the use of simple glutathione?

    Below study shows its benefits:
    http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24791752

    Other studies suggest the use in chelation therapy, but can I use it just for now, until I can get my hands on DMPS? I would like to combine with vitamin C and E.

    #118692

    raster
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    Glutathione is not a good chelating agent according to dr. cutler and this is one reason his chelation protocol is outdated because since he has passed, it has proven to be one of the top chelating agents.

    -raster

    #118695

    Tdog333
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    Glutathione is poorly absorbed through the gut, you’re better off taking N.A.C which is a direct precursor to glutathione. Some people nebulize glutathione, or use it topically, those are your best bets, but your body will stop producing glutathione once you start supplementing with it directly.

    Raster- Andrew Cutler never passed away, he’s still alive and kicking as far as I know. Glutathione is good at picking up mercury, but it’s also good at dumping it. It’s like taking chlorella. It has a single thiol group.

    #118696

    raster
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    Tdog333;57216 wrote: Glutathione is poorly absorbed through the gut, you’re better off taking N.A.C which is a direct precursor to glutathione. Some people nebulize glutathione, or use it topically, those are your best bets, but your body will stop producing glutathione once you start supplementing with it directly.

    Raster- Andrew Cutler never passed away, he’s still alive and kicking as far as I know. Glutathione is good at picking up mercury, but it’s also good at dumping it. It’s like taking chlorella. It has a single thiol group.

    From my understanding he passed away a decade ago and isn’t writing any more information and his family has taken over distributing his works.

    update: I can find no information about him passing and him being alive right now.

    -raster

    #118834

    ThomasJoel2
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    Cutler is still alive (he is old though) and is currently writing his third book. From what I can remember it’s going to be geared more towards the young adult, mid-twenties, CFS-type person and will once again focus on mercury toxicity.

    Tdog is correct. Here is some of what Cutler has to say regarding glutathione/NAC:
    [indent]
    “Those who have low glutathione or glutathione conjugation on the liver detox test are likely to benefit from N-acetyl cysteine (NAC) 600-4,000 mg/day.

    Supplementary glutathione itself is of very little value since your gut should digest it. If your gut is not digesting it you will soon start taking other things to MAKE your gut digest it because letting undigested things like glutathione into your bloodstream will soon cause major allergy problems.”[/indent]

    Glutathione levels in the body are extremely important no question, but glutathione is not a true chelator. It only contains one thiol group. From livingnetworks:

    [indent]”True chelators are identified by the presence of two dithiol groups. Many health practitioners and doctors use compounds such as chlorella, cysteine, NAC and glutathione, claiming they are chelators. But these are ineffective, because they are not actually chelating agents, as they do not contain two or more binding groups (dithiol groups), rather they contain only one thiol group. These compounds can make matters worse by causing redistribution of stored metals, by mobilizing them from their storage sites, but failing to bind and excrete them. This is like stirring up a hornets nest.”[/indent]

    Taking glutathione if you’re a high-sulfur person (someone who doesn’t tolerate sulfur foods) will most likely make you feel worse. Here’s more from Cutler on the connection between glutathione and mercury:

    [indent]”There are a number of connections and it is complicated.

    Glutathione is your body’s natural antioxidant and mercury is an oxidation catalyst, so mercury uses up glutathione and leads to reduced levels.

    Glutathione has a thiol group on it which mobilizes mercury and causes the mercury to be more toxic, so increasing glutathione levels makes whatever amount of mercury is present be MORE harmful.

    Thus there is a tradeoff, and you want the RIGHT AMOUNT of glutathione for your body’s needs. Not just more and more – you don’t want too much any more than you want too little.

    Some people’s bodies respond to mercury by making more thiol containing things like glutathione and cysteine. For these people they need to REDUCE their intake of everything sulfury to keep levels down.

    Other people’s bodies respond to mercury by having low levels of glutathione etc. and they need to INCREASE their intake of sulfury stuff.

    Mercury is excreted from the liver in bile while bound to glutathione. Since liver glutathione levels are tightly regulated this is not strongly influenced by eating more sulfury stuff – but the extent to which the existing mercury can be mobilized and made more toxic IS strongly influenced by how much sulfury stuff you eat.

    Yeast is nourished by glutathione and other sulfury stuff. Sulfur food restriction reduces yeast levels.”[/indent]

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