Tips on coping with the deprivation of the Candida diet.

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This topic contains 28 replies, has 12 voices, and was last updated by  alexalgebra 6 years, 1 month ago.

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  • #94237

    Tom1989
    Member
    Topics: 1
    Replies: 3

    Hi everyone,

    I am looking for some tips on how people cope with the overwhelming feeling of deprivation that can result from the food restriction of a typical candida diet.

    I have personally suffered with binge eating for some time and found it completely impossible to go on the diet. If I went on a restrictive diet, my bingeing episodes would just increase substantially. In fact, there is a consensus in the psychology field (especially where CBT is concerned) where highly restrictive eating can often proceed people developing binge eating disorder. Although I don’t entirely agree with this hypothesis, there is evidence that diets (like the candida one) can cause feelings of deprivation leading to a rebound effect (i.e. the binge).

    The good news is that I have been able to stop binge eating and reduce my refined sugar intake through the use of reinforcement and punishments (yes, I am a psychology student!).

    Also, have you found it’s better to transition to the candida diet gradually (e.g. reduce sugar intake over the first 4-6 weeks, before reducing/eliminating other problematic foods) or by just going cold turkey. I would prefer to hear people’s views based on experiences rather than what they believe.

    I would really like to hear what ways people have used to SUCCESSFULLY stick on the candida diet.

    Many Thanks,

    Tom

    #94240

    alexalgebra
    Member
    Topics: 41
    Replies: 643

    I can totally relate to this. I have been on an increasingly restricted diet for the past two years due to food intolerances, leaky gut, and now candida. Previous to that, I would do the restrict/binge yo-yo…eat super low fat/calories for a week, freak out and eat a bunch of junk, feel terribly guilty and go back on low fat, repeat…

    Sometimes eating these restricted diets for my health takes me back there, where I feel restricted and want to binge, but if I remind myself that the restrict/binge cycle I used to do is part of what got me where I am now, and that this one is to make me actually healthy again, that helps me stay more positive. I’m not gonna lie, it’s also taking quite a bit of willpower to not overeat on the things I *can* have, like not blowing through a loaf of coconut bread in a day, etc.

    I have attended a few OA meetings, which have proven to be quite helpful, but I just can’t bring myself to commit to the program completely. This is totally my fault, and it would probably help me a lot, but at this point, I still feel too overwhelmed. I hope to find the courage to commit someday soon, though.

    – Alex

    #94243

    hope4eva77
    Member
    Topics: 67
    Replies: 548

    i can sympathize !I do the same thing ,i start the diet and do it for 2 days and then binge on sugar !I told myself id start the diet when my supplements came or after new years and eat more than what i normally would in carbs and sugar !I feel guilty and the go back to the diet and reapeat the binge ! i bought l glutamate as many say it helps with cravings ,u can try this also ,i cant say if it works as i just started to take it today but many say it helps .

    i thought about trying to do it gradually and dont think its a problem ,i think anything that will help break our sugar addiction is worth trying and if t means eating a sweet potato or green apple instead of a candy bar to just get used to the change thats ok .
    how ever this will probably lengthen our recovery than if we went cold turkey and we may have a hard time giving up the apple also but i am doing it this way .

    #94244

    shayfo
    Member
    Topics: 18
    Replies: 668

    I think of it in terms of things I do and do not eat, rather than things I “can’t have.” I think that subtle linguistic acknowledgement of choice is self-reinforcing for me. I’ve been vegetarian/vegan for over 12 years, and meat doesn’t even register as food to me at this point. A bit over two years ago I discovered I have an allergy to gluten, and again, gluten-containing foods are things I “don’t” eat, rather than things I “can’t” eat. A similar mentality has been helping me with the candida diet (I’ve been on it not quite a month at this point). I didn’t purge my house of food when I started, because I frequently buy non-perishables in bulk, and it would literally take me months to work through it all. Resultantly, there’s a butternut squash in my kitchen, gluten-free grains and flours galore in my pantry, maple syrup in my fridge, jars of nuts…this could be seen as maddening temptation, but I almost think it’s comforting to know that someday — though presumably not someday particularly soon — I’ll get to eat those things again, though obviously with care and measure. I try to take a long-term view of things, knowing that not eating something RIGHT NOW doesn’t mean it’ll stop existing and that I’ll never get to eat it again.

    A friend commented yesterday that as an INTJ in MBTI jargon, I possibly also have above-average self-discipline. I have no idea if there’s any truth to that.

    I hope you figure out something that works for you.

    #94246

    Tom1989
    Member
    Topics: 1
    Replies: 3

    Thanks for the prompt responses!

    It kind of good in a way (although sad to hear) to know that I’m not the only one struggling with this candida diet-binge cycle. I originally believed that changing the diet gradually is better as this diet-binge behaviour seems to be almost a habit. And as you all know, habits die hard.

    In the past, when I have tried to change too many habits at once, I would fail abysmally. But then when trying to focus on only changing one behaviour at a time I seem to have more success (by not taking on too much). So I’m applying this experience with the candida diet. It seems logical to change your eating over a long period of time gradually, so as to build knew habits successfully.

    Tom

    #94260

    hope4eva77
    Member
    Topics: 67
    Replies: 548

    Yeah , everyone is different and sum people adapt to change better than others, I think even if it prolongs recovery if it helps break the addiction the benifits outweigh it.

    I am having a very hard time adjusting and it took me years to quit smoking but I did for my baby .eat a green apple or sum extra cocoanut bread.

    U are definitely not alone!

    #94270

    Cmcanepa
    Member
    Topics: 7
    Replies: 5

    When I feel deprived I allow myself to indulge in the foods I can have. One of the difficult things about the diet for me has been alcohol. I’m very social and lots of social situation involve alcohol so what I do is take a couple bottles of home-made water kefir to events like dinner parties and drink it out of a wine glass. It’s silly but sometimes I feel a bit tipsy. Same with coffee, I miss it but I drink chicory coffee with stevia and coconut cream and it really has replaced my morning routine of needing coffee before I do anything. I’ll put lots of cinnamon, clove, nutmeg and stevia in the coconut bread if I’m feeling deprived of desserts. Sometimes I eat way more than I need and I’ll feel a bit guilty but its all stuff that we are allowed… And plus I’ve lost a lot of weight on the diet. I never thought I could be so restrained with all the foods I loved before but I really have just found replacements. Today I was mostly at home and I ate sooo much but all within the diet. Hope this helps.
    Carisa

    #94271

    shayfo
    Member
    Topics: 18
    Replies: 668

    I definitely drank lemon water from a wine glass during my housemate’s birthday party 🙂 it gave me something to do while everyone else was getting drunk, and it kept me from having to tell 40 people why I wasn’t drinking.

    #98605

    FreeRadical44
    Member
    Topics: 2
    Replies: 6

    I was just reading these today as I’ve gotten terribly off track since almost a week ago when someone handed me the juiciest piece of papaya they just picked off a tree, and I could not resist one of my favorite foods. I have also the PMS getting me somewhat “unbalanced” and extra tired, unmotivated feeling, so today is just been hard, eating things high in sugar, and I need to figure out how to proceed. Do I start over with the cleanse? I did 5 tough days of fasting when I started, but had the luck of not working. Now I have to do massages every day, and need a lot more energy than I had during the cleanse. Maybe I can get through 3 days of fasting w/molybdenum? Constipation was a problem though throughout the cleansing period, for which I did enemas, because nothing else worked until I started eating grains.Basically my question has anyone had sugar and then just keep on stage 2 eating? or should I cleanse again?

    #98610

    hope4eva77
    Member
    Topics: 67
    Replies: 548

    i never did a cleanse but i also have a job that involves physical labor as nurse aid .i dont think u nedd to cleanse i have been struggling with this diet starting it and then binging and eating a bunch of forbidden foods at once than starting over again on phase 1 strict diet only to repeat the cycle i have yet to go thru a wk without cheating once so i am trying to make it thru !

    i decided that adding in a green apple in my oatbran every few days and sweet potato with stevia and cinnamon is ok so i dont feel so deprived .

    #98652

    shayfo
    Member
    Topics: 18
    Replies: 668

    FreeRadical, I would just get back on the strict diet. I don’t think it’s necessary to repeat the cleanse, and as a massage therapist, I sympathize with your energy requirements. Fasting makes it very difficult to work, and since fasting won’t cure the candida infestation, I think it’s better to just keep plugging along.

    #98785

    Kag
    Member
    Topics: 18
    Replies: 402

    I have found if I focus on the pain that I experienced on my lips it really helps me to not cheat. My acupunturist and I had an interesting conversation about this awhile back. We talked about how much food has become “emotional”, because for most of us, food is abundant. She said we have stopped eating for nutrition and have started eating for taste. She also said, food isn’t supposed to be quick or easy. I think she has an important point. You just have to get away from emotional eating. Like, I hate brussel sprouts, but I am still eating them, almost every day now. I try to focus on the way the food makes me feel physically instead of how it makes me “feel”. That said, I still cheat from time to time. I don’t think there is anything with rewarding good behavior. 🙂 I try not to let one food turn into twenty though, it is very difficult indeed.

    #98796

    FreeRadical44
    Member
    Topics: 2
    Replies: 6

    Thanks all for the replies. I am keeping strong making beautiful healthy food, that I can easily digest, and will help me continue to heal. Having been a bodybuilder in my past, I know how to be disciplined to a ‘T’ when it comes to food, but certain diets that I had been on, actually did me more harm than good when I look back at how what I was eating kept me lean, but very taxing on my organs. We all have our reasons as to how our bodies became infested with candida in the first place, so what a treasure to get to know all of your stories, and to be pioneers in this way.

    One practice that is definitely helping me stay on track for most of this diet is meditation.
    An extra way to learn to focus the mind to help one stay calm, balanced, and controlled. One thing that really threw me off the wagon, smoking mary j everyday. Once in a while, okay, but I learned for me that it slowly chipped away at my motivation to be “clean”, so cutting back on that 🙂

    #98825

    ellerbee
    Member
    Topics: 2
    Replies: 3

    Hey,

    Based upon my own experience and medical advice that suggests that complete elimination of carbohydrates may not be the best route for healthy weight, brain function, and emotional health, I had to say no to the strict candida diet. Instead, I relied on reasonable, healthy eating (what is recommended on Dr. Oz’s website or what your integrative MD would suggest) while using a variety of prescription strength antifungals, a probiotic, and a couple natural supplements (many of them recommended on this site). If you can’t get the prescription strength antifungals, then my heart totally goes out to you. I tried strict-ish forms of the candida diet and they were pretty uniformly disastrous for me. Because my brain is my big money-maker, I couldn’t risk compromising it ;). Have you thought of going to an integrative MD? Best of luck to you on your journey!

    #98830

    Kag
    Member
    Topics: 18
    Replies: 402

    I have, in the past, when I had a yeast infection, used prescription medication for yeast but I feel like with the diet you get at the root of the problem. I have always had a sweet tooth and I knew if I didn’t stop eating so many carbs and sugars, it wouldn’t matter how much medicine I took, I would always have the problem with the yeast. I see it as a way to get healthier too, honestly, this diet is better for all of us in the long run anyway, even people who don’t have candida.

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