The importance of the diet.!

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This topic contains 10 replies, has 5 voices, and was last updated by  Vegan Catlady 4 years, 11 months ago.

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  • #117909

    dvjorge
    Participant
    Topics: 283
    Replies: 1368

    Hi all,

    Unfortunately, during an active intestinal yeast overgrowth, the diet is critical to heal. I am posting it to let you know, specially new people battling an intestinal candidiasis, that a very strict diet is necessary in some cases. There are candida sufferers who needs to eliminate almost all carbohydrate to progress. I mean eating only green vegetables, eggs, fish, chicken, and getting most of the calories from beneficial oils.

    Buckwheat, quinoa, coconut flour, etc aren’t for everybody. They can be added during a second phase in the diet.

    This is documented in every candida book written by MDs who pioneered the research about this syndrome. If you don’t progress with your diet, cut more carbohydrates until it happens. Increasing the antifungals, even Rx, wont allow progress if your case is severe and you still consume enough carbohydrates to keep the yeast growing. Candida preferred place to growth is the Cecum and there isn’t way of targeting it effectively taking oral supplements.

    Jorge.

    #117911

    Tdog333
    Member
    Topics: 25
    Replies: 245

    It’s important to stay out of ketosis. The low carb might work for a month or two, but after that it will just hurt you.

    Yeast and fungi are eukaryotes that have mitochondria which can rapidly absorb ketones once they adapt to ketones as a primary fuel source. The adaptation is very slow and can take months. Once they do adapt the high fat low carb diet will provide lots of fuel for the mitochondria within the Candida.

    Additionally, you need fermentable carbohydrates to keep high levels of gut flora and to keep mucin production up, which is crucial for the gut barrier and immune system.

    Low-carb diets, alas, impair immunity to fungal and protozoal infections. The immune defense against these infections is glucose-dependent (as it relies on production of reactive oxygen species using glucose) and thyroid hormone-dependent (as thyroid hormone drives not only glucose availability, but also the availability of iodine for the myeloperoxidase pathway). Thus, anti-fungal immunity is downregulated on very low-carb diets.
    Moreover, eukaryotic pathogens such as fungi and protozoa can metabolize ketones. Thus, a ketogenic diet promotes growth and systemic invasion of these pathogens.
    As the fungal infection case studies on our “Results” page illustrate, low-carb dieters often develop fungal infections, and these often go away with increased starch consumption.
    Another issue is that mucus is essential for immunity at epithelial surfaces, and glycosylation is essential for the integrity of cellular junctions and tissue barriers such as the intestinal and blood-brain barriers. Thus, reduced production of mucus can impair intestinal immunity and promote gut dysbiosis or systemic infection by pathogens that enter through the gut.

    Finally, a very low-carb diet is not entirely free of risks of gut dysbiosis, and not just from fungal infections. Bacteria can metabolize the amino acid glutamine as well as mucosal sugars, so it is not possible to completely starve gut bacteria with a low-carb diet. Nor is it desirable, as this would eliminate a protective layer against systemic infection by pathogens that enter the body through the gut…
    Source

    Dietary carbs can feed Candida in the gut, but they also feed competing probiotic bacteria and promote intestinal barrier integrity and immune function, and thus their effect on the gut flora is complex. More importantly, ketosis promotes systemic invasion by Candida and glucose is needed for the immune defense to Candida, so a moderate carb intake is helpful to the defense against systemic Candida. As Candida is an effective intracellular pathogen that can flourish systemically, this is a very important consideration. No one with a Candida infection should eat a ketogenic diet.

    The ability to neutrophils from diabetics to kill candida was inhibited by increased concentrations of glucose and beta-hydroxybutyrate, both independently and in combination.

    These data indicate that although phagocytosis occurs at similar levels in diabetics and controls, killing of candida by the diabetic neutrophil is impaired under conditions of hyperglycaemia and ketosis.
    http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/3084140

    Therefore, prolonged ketosis may be a significant risk factor for candidiasis. This study was undertaken to investigate whether C. albicans itself produces a ketotic metabolite as a virulence factor which can effectively undermine host defense by neutrophils.

    “Starvation of yeast cells induces exponentially grown cells (and usually non-germinative) to germinate. This phenomenon is also observed in cells that are transiently treated with metabolic inhibitors. During each of these treatments (starvation, metabolic inhibition), expression of a growth regulatory gene (CGRI) increases. Candida albicans: adherence, signaling and virulence.” Calderone et al. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/11204138

    #117913

    dvjorge
    Participant
    Topics: 283
    Replies: 1368

    Tdog333;56432 wrote: It’s important to stay out of ketosis. The low carb might work for a month or two, but after that it will just hurt you.

    Yeast and fungi are eukaryotes that have mitochondria which can rapidly absorb ketones once they adapt to ketones as a primary fuel source. The adaptation is very slow and can take months. Once they do adapt the high fat low carb diet will provide lots of fuel for the mitochondria within the Candida.

    Additionally, you need fermentable carbohydrates to keep high levels of gut flora and to keep mucin production up, which is crucial for the gut barrier and immune system.

    Low-carb diets, alas, impair immunity to fungal and protozoal infections. The immune defense against these infections is glucose-dependent (as it relies on production of reactive oxygen species using glucose) and thyroid hormone-dependent (as thyroid hormone drives not only glucose availability, but also the availability of iodine for the myeloperoxidase pathway). Thus, anti-fungal immunity is downregulated on very low-carb diets.
    Moreover, eukaryotic pathogens such as fungi and protozoa can metabolize ketones. Thus, a ketogenic diet promotes growth and systemic invasion of these pathogens.
    As the fungal infection case studies on our “Results” page illustrate, low-carb dieters often develop fungal infections, and these often go away with increased starch consumption.
    Another issue is that mucus is essential for immunity at epithelial surfaces, and glycosylation is essential for the integrity of cellular junctions and tissue barriers such as the intestinal and blood-brain barriers. Thus, reduced production of mucus can impair intestinal immunity and promote gut dysbiosis or systemic infection by pathogens that enter through the gut.

    Finally, a very low-carb diet is not entirely free of risks of gut dysbiosis, and not just from fungal infections. Bacteria can metabolize the amino acid glutamine as well as mucosal sugars, so it is not possible to completely starve gut bacteria with a low-carb diet. Nor is it desirable, as this would eliminate a protective layer against systemic infection by pathogens that enter the body through the gut…
    Source

    Dietary carbs can feed Candida in the gut, but they also feed competing probiotic bacteria and promote intestinal barrier integrity and immune function, and thus their effect on the gut flora is complex. More importantly, ketosis promotes systemic invasion by Candida and glucose is needed for the immune defense to Candida, so a moderate carb intake is helpful to the defense against systemic Candida. As Candida is an effective intracellular pathogen that can flourish systemically, this is a very important consideration. No one with a Candida infection should eat a ketogenic diet.

    The ability to neutrophils from diabetics to kill candida was inhibited by increased concentrations of glucose and beta-hydroxybutyrate, both independently and in combination.

    These data indicate that although phagocytosis occurs at similar levels in diabetics and controls, killing of candida by the diabetic neutrophil is impaired under conditions of hyperglycaemia and ketosis.
    http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/3084140

    Therefore, prolonged ketosis may be a significant risk factor for candidiasis. This study was undertaken to investigate whether C. albicans itself produces a ketotic metabolite as a virulence factor which can effectively undermine host defense by neutrophils.

    “Starvation of yeast cells induces exponentially grown cells (and usually non-germinative) to germinate. This phenomenon is also observed in cells that are transiently treated with metabolic inhibitors. During each of these treatments (starvation, metabolic inhibition), expression of a growth regulatory gene (CGRI) increases. Candida albicans: adherence, signaling and virulence.” Calderone et al. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/11204138

    Yes, I am aware of all that. However, in practice, there are some cases of severe intestinal candidiasis that needs to go lower than 60g of carbohydrates a day for some time. (some people need 2 or 3 months)

    This is the only way to get better since there isn’t an effective way to target the lower intestinal part. Nystatin is a non-systemic antifungal drug very effective against candida albicans. Its low absorption makes it ideal to treat the gut lumen. However, it mixes with fecal matter and disappears inside the gut having almost no contact with candida colonies living on the mucus layer that covers the intestinal walls. All the “natural” antifungals may cause even a lower effect since they are absorbed in the upper part or disappear in the fecal bowl .

    I am not advocating or encouraging people to follow a very strict diet. I am ALERTING those who doesn’t get well months by months following a more free diet against candida. If you don’t progress in a couple of months, don’t expect it will happen 6 months later if you follow the same treatment. Unfortunately, this is the way it is with an intestinal yeast overgrowth.

    An anticandida diet varies according to every single case. There isn’t a universal anticandida diet that feeds every single case.

    Jorge.

    See this about Nystatin :

    Concentrations of nystatin in faeces after oral administration of various doses of nystatin.
    Hofstra W, de Vries-Hospers HG, van der Waaij D.
    Abstract
    Nystatin was administered in ten healthy adult volunteers in increasing doses of 3 X 10(6) I U, 6 X 10(6) I U, 9 X 10(6) I U and 12 X 10(6) I U per day, each dose being given for a five-day period. Faecal samples were collected daily for the determination of their concentration of biologically active nystatin. Nystatin concentrations were determined biologically; the sensitivity of this method was less than or equal to 20 mcg/g of faeces. During the four treatment periods with increasing doses, 38%, 31%, 26% and 20% respectively of the faecal samples contained biologically undetectable amounts of nystatin. This means that nystatin is either inactivated or unevenly distributed through the intestinal contents, or both. The practical consequences of this may be that in a significant portion of the colon there is no inhibitory nystatin concentration against Candida albicans, despite treatment with as much as 12 X 10(6) I U of nystatin per day.

    #117917

    dvjorge
    Participant
    Topics: 283
    Replies: 1368

    I answered you but my post went to moderation. Sometimes it happens.

    Jorge.

    #117918

    Vegan Catlady
    Member
    Topics: 34
    Replies: 626

    Tdog333;56432 wrote: It’s important to stay out of ketosis. The low carb might work for a month or two, but after that it will just hurt you.

    Yeast and fungi are eukaryotes that have mitochondria which can rapidly absorb ketones once they adapt to ketones as a primary fuel source. The adaptation is very slow and can take months. Once they do adapt the high fat low carb diet will provide lots of fuel for the mitochondria within the Candida.

    Additionally, you need fermentable carbohydrates to keep high levels of gut flora and to keep mucin production up, which is crucial for the gut barrier and immune system.

    My own experiences support this,could not agree more.
    What I worry about is coconut oil and its ketogenic quality. I wanted to feed it to my grandmother (94) but she cant have ketones because it was told to me that it would damage her kidneys further (she is diabetic).
    I have researched this but for some reason could not find info relating higher-carb diets with foods like coconut oil. I mean, consuming a ketones in oil isnt the same as being in ketosis,right? But it acidifies the body?

    I ask because when I research and the info isnt readily-available to me, I assume I am asking the wrong questions.

    #117920

    Tdog333
    Member
    Topics: 25
    Replies: 245

    Okay that makes sense Jorge I just misunderstood and thought you were saying every case needs to go into ketosis, thanks for clearing that up!

    #117938

    ThomasJoel2
    Participant
    Topics: 9
    Replies: 375

    Any way to tell whether or not you’re in ketosis?

    #117942

    raster
    Participant
    Topics: 104
    Replies: 6838

    Vegan Catlady;56439 wrote:

    It’s important to stay out of ketosis. The low carb might work for a month or two, but after that it will just hurt you.

    Yeast and fungi are eukaryotes that have mitochondria which can rapidly absorb ketones once they adapt to ketones as a primary fuel source. The adaptation is very slow and can take months. Once they do adapt the high fat low carb diet will provide lots of fuel for the mitochondria within the Candida.

    Additionally, you need fermentable carbohydrates to keep high levels of gut flora and to keep mucin production up, which is crucial for the gut barrier and immune system.

    My own experiences support this,could not agree more.
    What I worry about is coconut oil and its ketogenic quality. I wanted to feed it to my grandmother (94) but she cant have ketones because it was told to me that it would damage her kidneys further (she is diabetic).
    I have researched this but for some reason could not find info relating higher-carb diets with foods like coconut oil. I mean, consuming a ketones in oil isnt the same as being in ketosis,right? But it acidifies the body?

    I ask because when I research and the info isnt readily-available to me, I assume I am asking the wrong questions.

    I would not mess around with an old ladies health in my opinion, they lived this long because there wasn’t vaccines and bad food for most of their life…

    -raster

    #117950

    Tdog333
    Member
    Topics: 25
    Replies: 245

    ThomasJoel2;56459 wrote: Any way to tell whether or not you’re in ketosis?

    You can buy test strips for pretty cheap, something like this:
    http://www.cvs.com/shop/product-detail/CVS-Ketocare-Reagent-Strips?skuId=306412

    #117953

    Vegan Catlady
    Member
    Topics: 34
    Replies: 626

    raster;56463 wrote:

    I would not mess around with an old ladies health in my opinion, they lived this long because there wasn’t vaccines and bad food for most of their life…

    -raster

    If your theory was correct, then everyone in her generation would live that long.
    That has not been our experience. She has outlived most her family.

    We differ considerably,raster.
    If I lived in fear, her and I would not have achieved what we have.
    “Messing” implies I have not done my research or that I would use my grandmother as a test-subject. Thank you.
    Her doctor tested her every step of the way, and is now using her example to improve his own protocols.

    My grandmother was taking SIX different meds when she came to live with me.
    She was in and out of diabetic comas. She was on shots. She was on statins. She was on thyroid meds. Kidney meds. Water pills. A bunch of nonsense.

    It took a decent amount of courage to take the woman that practically raised me and do research for hours on end so that I could improve her quality of life.

    Her doctor couldnt believe that after I changed her diet to a HIGH CARB MOSTLY FRUIT DIET, she nolonger required shots or statins.

    He took her off shots, put her on a low dose of glypizide.

    He eventually decided she nolonger needed her water pills or her kidney meds.

    He lowered her thyroid meds 3 different times (pretty good for a so-called broken thyroid,eh?).

    He told us that her cholesterol is better than his.

    AT 94, she still gets around and does her crosswords and reads her gossip mags.

    She is now on ONLY the lowest dose of glypizide which we were allowed to take her off of, but sometimes she still takes it, and a thyroid pill.

    But hey…..what do I know?

    #117956

    Vegan Catlady
    Member
    Topics: 34
    Replies: 626

    Tdog333;56476 wrote: If I were her I would be using C60 CoQ10 PQQ MitoQ and NT Factor(Phosphotidylcholine mix) Not that I’m advocating giving that stuff to her, but look into it and see what you think…

    I will make it a point to research these supplements, I appreciate the help immensely.

    If we use them, I will report her experience,as it might help someone else.

    Thank you!

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