Success is imminent

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This topic contains 14 replies, has 4 voices, and was last updated by  Luke 5 years, 10 months ago.

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  • #100698

    Luke
    Participant
    Topics: 8
    Replies: 20

    Hi everyone:

    To provide you with somewhat of a back story, I have reason to believe that I have been afflicted with candida and a leaky gut for many years. Some of the symptoms from which I currently suffer include stubborn (and widespread) acne, issues with digestion, weight loss, blurred vision, fatigue, rashes, and loose stools. While I’ve endeavoured to remedy this before, it’s only now that I consider myself diligent enough in my resolve to implement any lasting changes. Having said that, my newfound ambition is not without confusion. In fact, I don’t know how to proceed, which is why I’ve returned here. I need your help.

    Starting as soon as possible, I intend to follow this dietary plan until my symptoms desist. I happen to be intolerant to certain foods that are deemed okay in this diet, however, and therein lies the confusion. I’ve had done a food intolerance test, the results of which have listed eggs, certain vegetables, some nuts & seeds, etc. as severe food intolerances. I understand that upon following a strict dietary regime for a month or two, I can slowly begin to integrate some of these foods into my diet through trial and error; but also that, for the time being, I need to exclude them completely. I have searched the internet thoroughly for recipes catered to the candida diet while conjunctively meeting my needs, but most all have included some form of eggs, the other aforesaid foods I’m intolerant to, and so on. How am I to devise a weekly meal plan including tasty and compliant recipes when I’m intolerant to many of the ingredients they include? If anyone has any knowledge of any such recipes, I would be most appreciative to receive them.

    I also attend the gym 3-4 times per week. This is something that I must continue to do, and I’m wondering if anyone has any tips to proceed with it and the diet without succumbing to excessive fatigue, low blood sugar, etc. What can I do to circumvent this? Keep in mind that my gym routine is currently less intensive, as I was in a car accident five years ago and am only now beginning to rebuild my body by way of fitness.

    Concurrently, I will be taking a multivitamin, undecylenic acid, and a probiotic. I may have additional queries, but for now, I feel I’ve covered my most pressing concerns. I would be most indebted to anyone who could provide me with any insight on this matter. I want to start the diet as soon as possible, and I’m eager to formulate a decisive approach.

    Respectfully,
    Luke.

    #100704

    raster
    Participant
    Topics: 104
    Replies: 6838

    Hello Luke,

    I checked out this food list and unfortunately it has some problems when you are trying to do a candida diet. For instance, tomatoes and carrots are included in the list and these are both high in the glycemic index and are high in sugars. Carrots also contain starch which converts to sugar. Both of these items should not be consumed in high quantities and only in low quantities. Why are these items alright but not potatoes or pumpkin? Makes no sense…

    Beef is also problematic because it takes 2+ days to digest whereas chicken and fish take hours to digest. If you want to heal your leaky gut as quickly as possible, I would not consume beef or pork. Additionally, if you eat meat a bunch, this produces ammonia which benefits the candida. Limiting the amount of meat can bring a benefit and its best to find the right balance.

    I also would not touch vegetable glycerin and yacon syrup.

    I am unsure why they think cranberry and lemon juice is so great. We do recommend lemon juice on the forum but cranberries you might want to be more cautious with.

    Sparkling soda is problematic because the CO2 found in the soda (bubbles) benefit the candida.

    The reason you are intolerant to nuts, eggs, etc. is due to leaky gut as you may know. You won’t be intolerant to these items forever and if you heal properly, it should heal within a few months hopefully. It took me about a year.

    We don’t recommend beans until stage 2 or when you are basically symptom free. This might be a good egg replacement though. Beans are high in starch.

    I am also confused why teff and buckwheat should be limited on this diet when they provide prebiotics which feed the beneficial bacteria in the gut. This makes no sense from my standpoint.

    As far as working out, you should think this out further before you do it. You need to heal your gut, not build muscle mass. Working out can drain you adrenals which you need for you immune system. You also need the energy for healing. I would consider not working out for the first few months while on the diet.

    We developed this general plan if you are interested:
    http://www.thecandidadiet.com/forum/yaf_postst1334_From-Able-and-Raster-The-Protocol.aspx

    -raster

    #100712

    Luke
    Participant
    Topics: 8
    Replies: 20

    Hi Raster:

    Thank you for your knowledgeable and thorough response.

    I printed out the diet plan I linked to in my first post and crossed off the foods I’m intolerant to, as well as the foods that I know are generally unacceptable on the candida diet (tomatoes, carrots, pumpkin, etc.). I wouldn’t consider eating anything else you mentioned, either.

    I will be sure to avoid beef or pork, but what would you suggest as a limit to how much meat I can consume each day? I don’t like meat to begin with and would rather avoid it altogether, but given the strict nature of the candida diet, I feel that I need as much fuel as possible. Also, what about grains? According to the diet I linked to, one “Type 3” grain is acceptable each day, as is one “Type 2” grain. If I were to have any grain, it would be quinoa.

    While your advice pertaining to fitness has been duly noted, I’m afraid I must continue my regular workout regime. It mostly consists of palates, yoga, cardio, and some light weights, and I’ve found it to be very beneficial in terms of my mood and feeling of productivity. In fact, some websites I’d visited regarding candida treatment recommend physical activity while on the diet for those very reasons. It contributes to a healthy lifestyle. All of this being said, I acknowledge your advice on the matter and will watch myself.

    By the way, is there some kind of protein powder I can ingest on a regular basis? Or would this counteract with my meal plan and inhibit the healing process. Furthermore, what about dietary fibre? Psyllium husk for example? What would you consider to be the best breakfast food? Breakfast is the meal with which I have the most trouble while on this diet. Lastly, what about snacks between meals? I normally have raw almonds.

    Again, thank you very much for your help and support. I’m grateful.

    #100713

    raster
    Participant
    Topics: 104
    Replies: 6838

    If you soak the almonds and roast them, this will destroy all of the molds found on them. This is likely why you are allergic to them, because of the molds (and the same goes for all nuts).

    I would look at using buckhweat as a good replacement for quinoa. We don’t recommend quinoa on the forum, especially if you have leaky gut. If you get gluten free oat bran (which is a prebiotic) this is also a good breakfast item or flour item. Quinoa is slightly inflammatory and contains high levels of starch. I also personally could not digest it and I eventually became allergic to it quickly after 3 servings. Buckwheat on the other hand is a prebiotic that feeds the beneficial bacteria in the gut.

    We recommend greek yogurt and kefir on the forum which are loaded with probiotics which you need to cure your infestation. These are good snacks and good breakfast items. If you make it homemade, they will be packed with even more beneficial bacteria than the store bought stuff.

    Fermented foods are also loaded with probiotics and examples include kim-chi, fermented cabbage, sauerkraut, etc.

    They have a generally good list but I would criticize the starchy food items more and value the prebiotic items more.

    Also, in order to heal leaky gut, you need to reduce the inflammation of the gut in order to do this. Certain foods are highly anti-inflammatory and pumpkin is one of them. Others include broccoli, fish, fruits (fruits are not on the diet though), etc.

    The exercises you mentioned are not as streneous as other activities such as weight lifting, running, training, etc. Finding a balance is the key and you might want to take it easy at first and then proceed with exercising as you get better. Something to think about. Some people push themselves a lot and you should not push yourself on the diet physically.

    I would not take psyllium which can cause constipation. I personally used miracle fiber which is pure inulin, however this should likely not be consumed throughout your whole treatment but is a great supplement to heal leaky gut. The inulin can feed the candida in the colon according to a different forum member.

    I would not eat meat 3x per day every day or something like this, but 1-4x per week should not pose much of a problem.

    I would look in the recipes section for other snack ideas but there are a ton. I don’t snack so I’m the worst person to ask about this lol.

    -raster

    #100820

    Luke
    Participant
    Topics: 8
    Replies: 20

    The almonds I purchased in bulk have already been roasted. Does that mean they’re without mold, or am I required to soak and roast them anyway? According to my food intolerance test, I am not intolerant to almonds.

    I’ll substitute quinoa with buckwheat, then. Like quiona, would there be a limit to how much buckwheat I consume each day?

    I’ve heard that fermented foods such as sauerkraut would be counter-productive in terms of healing candida? And as far as yogurt and kefir are concerned, considering my intolerance to dairy products, wouldn’t it be best that I avoid them altogether?

    I don’t intend to push myself too much with concern to exercise, but I definitely need it for mood and productivity. Also, what about protein powders? Are there any vegan protein powders that would comply with the candida diet? That you know of, I mean.

    Again, I’m so grateful for your prompt and informative replies. They mean a great deal to me.

    #100840

    shayfo
    Member
    Topics: 18
    Replies: 668

    I eat hemp protein powder in my hot cereal, which is usually either gluten-free oat bran or buckwheat. Hemp is fine on the diet.

    I avoid dairy completely, and I make my kefir from coconut milk and coconut water. If you make coconut milk kefir, the type of grains required need to take an occasional swim in dairy, so maybe find a friend who wants you to make them a few jars of milk kefir once in a while. A housemate buys organic milk for mine to take holidays in, between batches of coconut.

    If you make lactofermented sauerkraut with just salt brine, it’s probiotic and beneficial. I don’t believe the vinegar-based (store-bought) kind is recommended.

    #100900

    Luke
    Participant
    Topics: 8
    Replies: 20

    shayfo;39343 wrote: I eat hemp protein powder in my hot cereal, which is usually either gluten-free oat bran or buckwheat. Hemp is fine on the diet.

    I avoid dairy completely, and I make my kefir from coconut milk and coconut water. If you make coconut milk kefir, the type of grains required need to take an occasional swim in dairy, so maybe find a friend who wants you to make them a few jars of milk kefir once in a while. A housemate buys organic milk for mine to take holidays in, between batches of coconut.

    If you make lactofermented sauerkraut with just salt brine, it’s probiotic and beneficial. I don’t believe the vinegar-based (store-bought) kind is recommended.

    Hi Shayfo:

    Do you eat this gluten-free oat bran, buckwheat, and hemp regularly? As in, for breakfast and lunch?

    I apologize for the rapidity of my questions. As I mentioned in my earlier post, I want to get started as soon as possible, and certain things need to be clarified beforehand.

    #100901

    shayfo
    Member
    Topics: 18
    Replies: 668

    Luke;39403 wrote:
    Hi Shayfo:

    Do you eat this gluten-free oat bran, buckwheat, and hemp regularly? As in, for breakfast and lunch?

    I apologize for the rapidity of my questions. As I mentioned in my earlier post, I want to get started as soon as possible, and certain things need to be clarified beforehand.

    I eat an approved grain — gf oat bran, buckwheat, teff — once a day, usually (I find feel better when the other two meals are veggies). I include hemp powder most days, depending on whether I remember to add it, really.

    #101811

    Luke
    Participant
    Topics: 8
    Replies: 20

    Thank you for your input, shayfo. I would have thanked you much sooner, but things have been hectic.

    I have been on the diet for two full days, and am currently half-way through my third day. I must say, I am feeling absolutely drained. The strictness of the diet has resulted in a substantial reduction in food intake, and my body is craving fuel. My arms feel weak and I’m increasingly tired, but something interesting has come to light. Perhaps this is merely a placebo effect, but I’ve noticed that my eyesight is sharper than it was. Moreover, my skin–while still far from perfect–has cleared somewhat and appears more even in tone. Again, perhaps I’m imaging these things, but it’s what I’ve noticed.

    I’m concerned, however, as to whether or not I’m doing this correctly. I want to do it efficiently as well as effectively, and this thread suggests that I refrain from eating meat for at least one week before beginning the diet. The thing is, I’ve eaten (organic) meat for dinner the last two days. I have also read on this forum that I should avoid oat bran at first, and I’ve been having it each morning with a few drops of liquid stevia as an added sweetener. As for lunch, I’ve been eating roasted vegetables, and having almonds in-between meals as a snack. Am I doing this correctly? I don’t want to be making a grave mistake that will inhibit my progress.

    I have been taking 3 multi-vitamin capsules each morning as well as 3 undecyclenic acid capsules 3x daily with each meal. I’ve also been taking 1 probiotic capsule 3x daily with each meal. Furthermore, I’ve been drinking at least 10 glasses of cool/luke-warm water on a daily basis.

    Is this feeling of food deprivation normal? Are there any ways to ease it? In the aforesaid thread condoning its safe and proper cleanse, it suggests that I eat nothing but the vegetables listed for at least 10 days; how can one possibly do this? I have school to complete and am on a tight deadline, and I’ve also been attending the gym (nothing terribly straining). I can’t picture myself doing these things while abiding that cleanse. Is it absolutely necessary to undertake if I’m to heal properly?

    Again, am I doing this diet correctly? I haven’t felt any die-off symptoms, at least nothing aside from the extreme fatigue, the continuation of loose stools, and some light diarrhea. Are almonds okay to snack on at first? I feel like I need the fuel badly.

    I’d really appreciate any help. Many, many thanks to whomever provides any input.

    #101814

    raster
    Participant
    Topics: 104
    Replies: 6838

    You are mostly doing it right. We try to tier the food introduction, antifungals, and probiotics in the protocol so that you will have as few complications as possible. However, I personally just started the diet with antifungals and probiotics just like you did and it still works. The reason we tier these things is so you don’t do too much too fast; for some people the die-off could be so bad they go to the hospital. For some people, they get a reaction to meat or oat bran and this is why the protocol is overly cautious in this regards.

    Don’t worry about the cleanse because it is completely optional. The cleanse and diet are totally seperate stages.

    The food deprivation symptoms are pretty normal because the candida wants to be fed some. For some people they will crave grains, sugar, etc. (anything the candida likes).

    Almonds can set back your progress from my experience. Try out a week with them and a week without them. Its not very difficult to soak them overnight in some water and/or roast them in the oven.

    Try to eat some more food if you can so you become quite full after each meal.

    -raster

    #101824

    Luke
    Participant
    Topics: 8
    Replies: 20

    Thank you again, Raster. You’ve been a great deal of help.

    I’ll avoid almonds altogether then. What do you think about olive oil on the diet? Extra virgin, of course. For lunch this afternoon I roasted 3 heads of broccoli and several cloves of garlic after tossing them with extra virgin olive oil, sea salt, black pepper, and dried basil. What’s the word on these particular ingredients?

    I found that, after lunch, my throat became filled with mucus. Immediately after finishing lunch, however, I did drink some water. Is it recommended that I wait a certain length of time before drinking water after a meal?

    Lastly, could I include coconut oil, coconut flour, or organic butter in my recipes? What about celery and zucchini? I was looking at the zucchini pancakes recipe which calls for some of those ingredients and I’m curious as to whether or not I can eat them as I am now.

    I know, I know. I’m asking a lot of questions. Again, I appreciate your help. It’s just that there’s so much knowledge on candida, some of which can be contradicting, much of which can be confusing.

    Thank you again.

    #101834

    shayfo
    Member
    Topics: 18
    Replies: 668

    Extra virgin olive oil is great. You need fats in order to carry fat-soluble toxins out of your body, and you need them to keep your brain and other organs functioning. The other things you used to prepare your roasted broccoli are fine, too.

    The mucus could be die-off, since garlic is antifungal. It could also be a type of reflux. I drink water when I’m thirsty. I honestly believe the harm caused by dehydration merits more concern than worrying about diluting your stomach acid.

    Skip the butter. Be careful with coconut products as you introduce them, to make sure you don’t plummet yourself into intense die-off. Eat gradually more as you learn your limits. Celery and zucchini are totally fine.

    #101859

    Luke
    Participant
    Topics: 8
    Replies: 20

    Thank you again for your help, shayfo.

    Able sent me the diet so I’ve more clarity with concern to which foods I can eat, which to avoid, etc. I hope for his diet to serve as my guide from here on out.

    Also, no kidding about the coconut products. I hadn’t had any significant die-off symptoms prior to the consumption of a table-spoon of virgin coconut oil last night, after which I felt a little bit uncomfortable. I had another this morning and, wow, I feel extremely nauseous. My body feels warm and I’ve a slight headache as well. I’ve always questioned candida’s part in my health, but I think it’s safe to say that now I know for certain. That being said, my case doesn’t seem to be as profound as many others’ I have seen. It’s mostly intestinal resulting in weight loss, acne, food intolerances, impaired digestion, etc. A little verification can go a long way, which is exactly what I feel the coconut oil has done for me today.

    Wow.

    #101876

    candida_sucks
    Member
    Topics: 3
    Replies: 148

    Regarding your intolerance to eggs, I once experimented with the coconut bread recipe in this forum by replacing eggs with the combination of flaxseed meal and water, as per this website, which recommends replacing each egg with 1 tbsp ground flax seeds +3 tbsp water. It tasted pretty good (note that I added stevia and cinnamon, and use a combination of teff flour and coconut flour). The only drawback is that it takes longer to cook — 2 hours instead of the normal 1 hour when eggs are used.

    CS

    #102654

    Luke
    Participant
    Topics: 8
    Replies: 20

    Thank you for that. I did try baking the bread with the substitutes you mentioned. They turned okay, but the batter wouldn’t bind well. It was quite flavourless as well. Nevertheless, I will alter the recipe to better suit my taste. I appreciate your input, candida_sucks.

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