Starches — Able?

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This topic contains 12 replies, has 6 voices, and was last updated by  CT 7 years, 2 months ago.

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  • #70655

    Riinehart
    Member
    Topics: 4
    Replies: 21

    Hi Able and anyone else who might have any info in this regard:

    I’ve been wondering about the few different starchy items that are on our list for stage 2 (I know some are test items) – particularly oat bran, millet, coconut flour/bread, and buckwheat.

    First, I’m curious about the theory. Don’t our bodies convert carbs to glucose? Does this converted glucose feed candida? If so, is it only carb content that we should be on the lookout for with regard to these items, or are there other factors?

    A serving of millet, oat bran, and buckwheat has 62g, 41g, and 33.5g, respectively.

    Is this why millet is considered more of a test item?

    Are there other components to be aware of?

    I ask these questions sincerely, because I really don’t know, and I always worry that overeating any of these items will overfeed the beast, but I don’t see this talked about often.

    Any thoughts?

    #70657

    Javizy
    Member
    Topics: 20
    Replies: 945

    I’ve asked a similar question a few times. Buckwheat doesn’t look that impressive nutritionally asides from the absence of sugar. Lentils and other legumes have 1-2% of sugar but much more nutrition (high fibre and protein) in comparison.

    Another thing is sugars. 10g in a serving of Greek yoghurt or 5g in a serving of parsnip vs <1g in a serving of mozzarella. I know there are other factors, like probiotics in the yoghurt or fibre in the parsnip, that make them okay, but if you're eating a balanced meal, wouldn't 0.5g of unaged cheese sugar also be okay in the wider nutrition of the meal?

    #70670

    Lucylu
    Member
    Topics: 31
    Replies: 345

    Javizy – I think any cheese has a mold concern. Shame cos it’s one of the things I really miss.

    #70671

    Riinehart
    Member
    Topics: 4
    Replies: 21

    While we’re on that topic, as well, I’d like also to better understand this mold/candida relationship. It’s often stated that they’re related and to avoid mold, but the theory is very unclear to me.

    I’m not disputing it (I’ve actually noticed feeling much worse when exposed to mold – though this could be in and of itself), I’d just like to understand it.

    #70674

    raster
    Participant
    Topics: 104
    Replies: 6838

    Riinehart, I feel that there are a few factors to consider when eating/choosing foods.

    The most important is: Are you allergic to this food item? If you are allergic, then it does nothing good for you to get healthy as far as my understanding. For instance, I am allergic to rice bran (which is on allowed foods list) so I shouldn’t eat it. However, I am not allergic to potatoes (not on list) and this is a better choice for me (at this stage).

    The second consideration is how much sugar is in the food item. I check out this website when making those decisions:
    http://nutritiondata.self.com/

    Millet: 0g of sugar per 1 cup
    Buckwheat: 0g or very lower sugar per one cup
    Oat Bran: 0g or very lower sugar per one cup
    Coconut flour: 1g of sugar per cup(just a guess)

    So all of these are low or devoid of sugar. When compared to almost anything else you can eat, these items shouldn’t feed the candida very much. However, candida will be able to thrive on these to a certain degree.

    The third consideration is whether it contains molds. Candida is considered a yeast which can be a fungus and then a mold.

    Found this quote from a website “The Candida mold feeds off of the food that you eat, especially sugars and starches. This takes away from the nutrients which you need to survive. The mold then begins to produce it’s own waste products. These wastes are toxic to the system and cause most of the sickness and disease which plagues man.”

    Here is some more information about candida “Yeast are unicellular fungi. The precise classification is a field that uses the characteristics of the cell, ascospore and colony. Physiological characteristics are also used to identify species. One of the more well known characteristics is the ability to ferment sugars for the production of ethanol. Budding yeasts are true fungi of the phylum Ascomycetes, classHemiascomycetes. The true yeasts are separated into one main order Saccharomycetales.

    According to a recent study from the University of Tokyo, as Candida proliferates in the intestines, it can change its anatomy and physiology from the yeast-like form to the mycelial fungal form. It is well recognized that Candida Albicans is a dimorphic (two shapes and forms) organism and as such can exist in these two states. The yeast-like state in a non-invasive, sugar-fermenting organism, whereas the fungal state produces rhizoids, or very long root-like structures, which can penetrate the mucosa, and it is invasive.”
    http://www.mold-help.org/content/view/411/

    Another factor to consider is how inflammatory the food is to the body. Inflammatory foods include:

    -Dairy
    -Sugar
    -Alcohol
    -Caffeine
    -Red meat
    -Processed foods and foods with MSG or fake sugars
    -Common (morton’s) table salt
    -Trans fat
    -Common cooking oils
    -Refined grains

    Anti-inflammatory foods include:

    -Kelp
    -Turmeric
    -Wild salmon
    -Mushrooms
    -Grean tea
    -papaya
    -Blueberries
    -Olive oil
    -Broccoli
    -Sweat potato

    -Raster

    #70676

    Lucylu
    Member
    Topics: 31
    Replies: 345

    BUT Sweet potato and mushrooms are NOT allowed on this diet. Sweet potato because of the high starch/ sugar content and mushrooms because they’re a fungi?

    #70678

    raster
    Participant
    Topics: 104
    Replies: 6838

    Exactly lucy, but just giving examples…

    #70681

    Able900
    Spectator
    Topics: 92
    Replies: 4811

    Rinehart and Javizy;

    The point of the “Allowed Food” list is three-fold:

    1) To prevent feeding the Candida and at the same time avoid access weight loss.
    2) To obtain as many nutrients as possible from the diet that will allow support for the adrenals, begin the rebuilding the immune system, and provide the tools for curing leaky gut syndrome and the resulting allergies..
    3) To eat multiple foods containing prebiotics in order to feed the beneficial bacteria (flora) as often and as much as possible.

    It’s really that simple regardless of other factors.

    Oat bran flour and brown rice bran flour can be tested after two weeks on the diet and are beneficial because they are high quality prebiotics which feed the beneficial bacteria, plus the extra calories help to prevent access weight loss.

    Coconut flour can be used after two weeks on the diet because it’s not harmful to the treatment, it contains healthful nutrients, and because it’s a very good “filling” food item which can stop access weight loss.

    Buckwheat can be tested after two weeks on the diet because it isn’t a grain but rather a plant seed which does not feed the Candida but contains high quality fiber which acts as a prebiotic, it contains needed nutrients, high-biological-value proteins and prevents extra weight loss.

    Millet is a test food item and it’s on the diet because it contains 6 grams of quality protein per serving, doesn’t feed the Candida and because it’s a prebiotic which can feed the beneficial bacteria. The most beneficial attribute belonging to millet is a specific molecule which makes up the energy currency of the body.

    Teff flour is a test food and it’s on the diet because it’s gluten-free; an excellent source of protein which is needed since avoiding meat on the diet is beneficial; it contains over 100 types of beneficial bacteria; and it contains wheat “bran” which is a prebiotic that feeds the bacteria; and it’s high in Omega 3 and Omega 6 fatty acids, as well as being a plus in avoiding excess weight loss.

    Beans and legumes are fine on the diet providing you can tolerate them, and they contain a healthy and needed amount of vegetable protein. However, they’re definitely a test food as many Candida sufferers receive negative reactions to beans and lentils.

    Able

    #70682

    Javizy
    Member
    Topics: 20
    Replies: 945

    Lucylu wrote: Javizy – I think any cheese has a mold concern. Shame cos it’s one of the things I really miss.

    I don’t think this is true of unaged (white) cheeses. Cream cheese is made in a way simar to Greek yoghurt and cottage cheese can be made basically by heating some milk, and neither contain more than 1-2g of sugar per 100g. 

    I just can’t understand why the 0.5g of sugar in a serving of cottage cheese could be worse than the 10-50 times that you’d get from your daily Greek yoghurt or kefir. Yes, they have added benefits, but the lactose is still in your system and what if you had kefir with your cheese omelette?

    I’m enthusiastic about the diet and plan to stick to it strictly but I’d like to understand why we do what we’re doing instead of blindly following. Ultimately, it comes down to reactions like Raster said, but I don’t want to try things that aren’t “officially” allowed, so maybe someone knows about this sugar/starch thing.

    #70684

    Javizy
    Member
    Topics: 20
    Replies: 945

    Was typing at the same time there so I didn’t see your post there, Able. I didn’t know the carb choices had prebiotic properties, so that explains a lot. Legumes/lentils are so high in protein and fibre that I think they could cause issues for most if not eaten with care. Thanks for the informative post.

    #70686

    Able900
    Spectator
    Topics: 92
    Replies: 4811

    Javizy wrote: I’m enthusiastic about the diet and plan to stick to it strictly but I’d like to understand why we do what we’re doing instead of blindly following.

    Javizy;
    Good for you for not wishing to ‘blindly’ follow. If you’re following the experiences of others who have already gone through this or someone who has researched it thoroughly but at the same time you’re questioning the protocol and diet; then there’s no blind following involved.

    Able

    #70692

    Riinehart
    Member
    Topics: 4
    Replies: 21

    Able, thanks again for responding.

    I certainly understand the good properties of these foods and appreciate the information. But like Javizy, I’m looking to learn more about why these things work and how candida reacts to the different foods we eat.

    For instance, I still don’t understand whether (or how) candida feeds off of the glucose that our bodies convert from carbs. And if this is the case, then what we’re saying here often isn’t that a food like millet “doesn’t feed the Candida,” but rather that it feeds it to an extent but the pros may outweigh the cons. I’m trying to understand whether or not carbs, as a rule, feed candida.

    Of course I don’t expect you or any one person do be able to answer these questions in an instant (unless any members of the forum are biochemists?), I’m just trying to throw the questions out there to see if anyone has any information. I’m trying to research these things myself when I can, and I’ll post whatever I can find out.

    Thanks so much again for all the info.

    #70830

    CT
    Member
    Topics: 12
    Replies: 63

    raster wrote: The second consideration is how much sugar is in the food item. I check out this website when making those decisions:
    http://nutritiondata.self.com/

    Thanks for sharing this link Raster, I’ve been looking for something like this for ages!

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