Resistant starch and its role in feeding beneficial bacteria

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This topic contains 3 replies, has 3 voices, and was last updated by  SueSullivan 5 years ago.

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  • #116459

    SueSullivan
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    http://authoritynutrition.com/resistant-starch-101/?fb_action_ids=10203157338395106&fb_action_types=og.likes&fb_source=other_multiline&action_object_map=%5B277998522356022%5D&action_type_map=%5B%22og.likes%22%5D&action_ref_map=%5B%5D

    This is a well-written article about resistant starches, which if I’m understanding correctly, are the prebiotics that Able used to advise adding to the strict diet — inulin being a prime one and found in chicory root, and garlic, leek and onions, though the latter 3 sources might not work for people with sulfur issues.)

    I’ve been drinking chicory root coffee every morning for eight months now. Fairly early on my blood sugar issues stabilized. Hard to say what element of the diet or protocol was the reason for this, but this research points to the chicory.

    Obviously some sources of resistant starch would not be appropriate for a low-carb candida diet, but others definitely are — jerusalem artichokes, chicory and the alliums.

    As I prepare to rebuild my gut flora after a surgery and antibiotic round, I’m going to really focus on these.

    fwiw,
    Sue

    #116461

    Vegan Catlady
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    Topics: 34
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    I have it posted where there is a forum of people who was on the fence with whether resistant starched raised blood sugar.
    Several people there cooked white potatoes, and then refrigerated them for a minimum of 24 hours.

    They took their blood sugar reading an hour after consuming (some were more detailed in recording than others) and I think there was only 1 or 2 that actually saw their blood sugar rise more than a few points.

    I found this amazing.

    Cooling cooked starches allegedly works for potatoes and rice, cornflakes are considered resistant, cant remember off hand what else but it was impressive to read the value in helping starch to become resistant by chilling.

    This is important info for anyone thinking a cooked white potato is still “high carb” after a day in the fridge.
    I havent tried this more than a few times myself, but until I get blood sugar readings on it, I wont sell anyone else on the white potato/rice diet,lol.

    The only problem I see with using resistant starches as a strategy for gut flora-building is that elimination has to working really smoothly for this to work with foods that arent natural antifungal resistant starches.

    Wicked cool topic,cant believe its not a topic more commonly researched.

    #116519

    M
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    @Sue,

    What brand of chicory coffee are you using?

    #116533

    SueSullivan
    Member
    Topics: 18
    Replies: 108

    The first batch I bought, per Able’s recc, was from Orleans Coffee Exchange:
    http://www.orleanscoffee.com/coffee/American-Chicory-roasted.html

    but then I noticed that the place we buy our green coffee beans from had pure roasted chicory for even less. I bought 10 pound for about $4 a pound from them:
    http://www.sweetmarias.com/coffee/other/chicory?source=side

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