Probiotic questions.

Home The Candida Forum Candida Questions Probiotic questions.

This topic contains 7 replies, has 4 voices, and was last updated by  raster 7 years ago.

Viewing 8 posts - 1 through 8 (of 8 total)
  • Author
    Posts
  • #78558

    xday2dazex
    Member
    Topics: 81
    Replies: 108

    So I had a few questions I wanted to ask since I just started taking probiotics.

    1. What are some of the best prebiotic foods on the diet and when should I eat them in relation to when I take my probiotic?

    2. What are some of the best sources of inulin?

    3. It’s recommended that you take probiotics at least 3 hours before or after antifungals. Does this include antifungal food like garlic and onions, herbal teas with antifungal properties, or dressings like acv and acv mustard?

    4. Why does it say to try another brand after a month in the probiotics thread?

    -Day

    #78561

    blakek89
    Member
    Topics: 21
    Replies: 186

    xday2dazex wrote: So I had a few questions I wanted to ask since I just started taking probiotics.

    1. What are some of the best prebiotic foods on the diet and when should I eat them in relation to when I take my probiotic?

    2. What are some of the best sources of inulin?

    3. It’s recommended that you take probiotics at least 3 hours before or after antifungals. Does this include antifungal food like garlic and onions, herbal teas with antifungal properties, or dressings like acv and acv mustard?

    4. Why does it say to try another brand after a month in the probiotics thread?

    -Day

    1. It really does not matter when you eat it because fibre stays in your colon for days and feeds the bacteria, so if you wanted to put a time frame on it spread it out morning and night.

    2. Pure Inulin is excellent, Acacia Fibre another excellent both really help with constipation. Chicory root/coffee, Oat bran, Rice Bran, Garlic, Leeks, Flax seeds.

    3. For the probiotics it depends on what the bottle says certain brands use different capsules that digest at different pH’s and I take all of mine at night around 11 p.m. with a glass of kefir and a bite of raw sauerkraut.

    4. The reason for switching it up is variety, to get best chance for a speedy recovery using different strains help.

    #78562

    blakek89
    Member
    Topics: 21
    Replies: 186

    Do not take anti-fungals with your probiotics especially garlic.

    #78563

    princeofsin
    Member
    Topics: 1
    Replies: 224

    Garden of life probiotic is what I take and seems to work really good and I am currently drinking kombucha.

    #78567

    blakek89
    Member
    Topics: 21
    Replies: 186

    princeofsin wrote: Garden of life probiotic is what I take and seems to work really good and I am currently drinking kombucha.

    Good choice with the kombucha is it home brewed?
    How long have you been on Garden of Life?

    #78607

    raster
    Participant
    Topics: 104
    Replies: 6838

    Here’s some info about prebiotics:

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Prebiotic_(nutrition)

    Foods with FOS contain prebiotics.

    ” onions, chicory root, garlic, asparagus, jícama, and leeks. Some grains and cereals, such as buckwheat, also contain FOS. The Jerusalem artichoke and its relative yacón have been found to have the highest concentrations of FOS of cultured plants.”

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fructooligosaccharide

    Miracle fiber (aka inulin) is a great source of FOS and I add it to my yogurts, breads, etc.

    Buckwheat, oat bran and teff are other examples of prebiotics.

    -raster

    #78614

    xday2dazex
    Member
    Topics: 81
    Replies: 108

    Thanks a lot guys, I’ll be buying some chicory root coffee and miracle fibre and will continue to eat a lot of garlic, onion, and asparagus. Btw, what is fos?

    #78615

    raster
    Participant
    Topics: 104
    Replies: 6838

    “Fructooligosaccharides (FOS) also sometimes called oligofructose or oligofructan, are oligosaccharide fructans, used as an alternative sweetener. FOS exhibits sweetness levels between 30 and 50 percent of sugar in commercially-prepared syrups. It occurs naturally, and its commercial use emerged in the 1980s in response to consumer demand for healthier and calorie-reduced foods.”

    “Because of the configuration of their osidic bonds, fructooligosaccharides resist hydrolysis by salivary and intestinal digestive enzymes. In the colon they are fermented by anaerobic bacteria. In other words, they have a lower caloric value, while contributing to the dietary fiber fraction of the diet. Fructooligosaccharides are more soluble than inulins and are, therefore, sometimes used as an additive to yogurt and other (dairy) products. Fructooligosaccharides are used specially in combination with high-intensity artificial sweeteners, whose sweetness profile and aftertaste it improves.”

    “FOS has been a popular dietary supplement in Japan for many years, even before 1990, when the Japanese government installed a “Functionalized Food Study Committee” of 22 experts to start to regulate “special nutrition foods or functional foods” that contain the categories of fortified foods (e.g., vitamin-fortified wheat flour), and is now becoming increasingly popular in Western cultures for its prebiotic effects. FOS serves as a substrate for microflora in the large intestine, increasing the overall gastrointestinal tract (GI Tract) health. It has also been touted as a supplement for preventing yeast infections.

    Several studies have found that FOS and inulin promote calcium absorption in both the animal and the human gut. The intestinal microflora in the lower gut can ferment FOS, which results in a reduced pH. Calcium is more soluble in acid, and, therefore, more of it comes out of food and is available to move from the gut into the bloodstream.

    FOS can be considered a small dietary fibre with (like all types of fibre) low caloric value. The fermentation of FOS results in the production of gases and acids. The latter provide some energy to the body.

    All inulin-type prebiotics, including FOS, are generally thought to stimulate the growth of Bifidobacteria species. Bifidobacteria are considered “friendly” bacteria. This effect has not been uniformly found in all studies, both for Bifidobacteria and for other gut organisms. FOS are also fermented by numerous bacterial species in the intestine, including Klebsiella, E. coli and many Clostridium species, which are considered less-friendly bacteria in the gut. These species are responsible mainly for the gas formation (hydrogen and carbon dioxide), which results after ingestion of FOS. Most people can eat 5-10 grams of FOS without gaseous discomfort, whereas others have problems with 1 gram. The estimated optimal dose for adults is around 5-10 gram/day.”

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fructooligosaccharide

    -raster

Viewing 8 posts - 1 through 8 (of 8 total)

The topic ‘Probiotic questions.’ is closed to new replies.