Potassium levels

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This topic contains 2 replies, has 2 voices, and was last updated by  Able900 7 years, 5 months ago.

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  • #65861

    jamesb
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    I fully understand the need to keep sodium/salt levels in the body at a good level due to the need for drinking fairly high volumes of water in order to flush out the candida toxins from the body. I was wondering if the same applies to potassium, this is a type of body salt isn’t it? would drinking plenty of water have the same effect and flush out too much potassium from the body?

    If so, is anyone taking any potassium suplements?

    #65879

    jamesb
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    Comments anyone?

    #65885

    Able900
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    Like many vitamins and minerals, there is a natural ratio of potassium and salt in the human body, this ration is 2:1 with twice as much potassium as salt.

    A “balanced” food source, or natural, unprocessed food normally will contain this ratio or very close to it.

    Of course, the more salt you eat, the more you will need a lot more potassium in order to balance your sodium intake. In other words, an abnormally high sodium intake can create a potassium deficiency.

    All living cells need potassium, sodium and chloride in order to remain healthy. This is why there is normally an abundance of these in the food we eat, and this is exactly why it’s one of the main reasons that processed foods are such a big problem, because there so much sodium is used in processed foods, which can cause an imbalance of sodium and potassium.

    Normally it’s safe to drink water throughout the day and also with your meals, but you will need to eat food which contains salt and potassium. Having one or two food items containing each can make a big difference in your electrolyte balances in your body. You should notice that you need to use the restroom approximately every 1 to 2 hours. This is to keep the balance in check.

    I remember reading one particular case of a woman who died because of drinking too much water. But what these news reports often fail to do is to report the details of exactly what the person did (or didn’t do) during the period of time of the water intake. In the case of this woman, she consumed almost two gallons of water during a short period of time – without using the restroom. This created a disturbance in her brain called hyponatremia, which results when a balance of electrolytes (salt and potassium) in the body is pushed out of safe limits by rapid intake of water without using the restroom during a short period of time. In other words, drinking all the water and not using the restroom caused the hyponatremia.
    Spreading the water over a 24 hour period, including both potassium and sodium in the diet during the time, and using the restroom when she needed to would have been the safe way to drink the water and would not have led to her death.

    In no particular order, below are the foods containing potassium. Whether or not the foods pertain to the Candida diet is another matter.

    Avocados
    Cucumber
    Bell pepper
    Basil
    Brussels sprouts
    Green beans
    Turmeric
    Apricots
    Ginger root
    Beef
    Asparagus
    Black beans
    Broccoli, lightly steamed
    Cantaloupe
    Banana
    Romaine lettuce
    Tuna
    Halibut
    Scallops
    Cabbage
    Carrots, raw
    Cauliflower, lightly steamed
    Celery
    Chicken
    Chard
    Fennel, raw
    Collard greens
    Turnip greens
    Chickpeas
    Coconut water
    Flounder
    Kidney
    Kiwi
    Lentils
    Milk (cow and goat)
    Nuts
    Okra
    Orange
    Orange juice
    Potatoes, baked with skin
    Prune Juice
    Spinach, lightly steamed
    Strawberries
    Sweet potatoes
    Tomato
    Tomato juice
    Yogurt
    Watermelon
    Wheat Germ

    If you would feel safer with a potassium supplement, they’re available on the open market and sold with the name potassium gluconate.

    Able

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