Omega 3 fatty acid

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This topic contains 7 replies, has 5 voices, and was last updated by  benc 6 years, 11 months ago.

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  • #86885

    s.
    Member
    Topics: 12
    Replies: 80

    Did anyone catch this from Dr. Ayers, Cooling Inflammation Blog: “Yeast infections are common after prolonged antibiotic treatment. Interestingly, Candida produces resolvins from omega-3 fatty acids and the resolvins suppress neutrophil activity that would attack the yeast. Thus, many of the anti-inflammatory treatments would actually aggravate yeast infections and contribute to rosacea.”

    #86886

    Javizy
    Member
    Topics: 20
    Replies: 945

    PUFAs seem to benefit candida and lead to general poor health in a lot of ways. There was a study or two suggesting marine oils could kill candida though. People without candida have experienced positive results with temporary high doses of fish oil. PUFAs have a half-life of around 2-years, so I guess this kind of overcompensation is necessary for short-term gains. PUFAs and especially marine oils are extremely unstable, so I think there are a number of drawbacks to this approach. I’ve come to believe the best strategy for long-term health is minimising all PUFAs, relying mainly on those found in dairy, meat, eggs and vegetables for EFAs and occasional fatty fish for O6-O3 balance. I’m starting to lose faith in supplements in general, although some are hard to avoid (vitamin D).

    There’s an in-depth look at EFAs here if you’re interested http://www.westonaprice.org/know-your-fats/precious-yet-perilous

    #86889

    s.
    Member
    Topics: 12
    Replies: 80

    Really nice article. Thanks for sharing.

    #86914

    flailingWcandi
    Member
    Topics: 13
    Replies: 277

    Thank you for sharing the Weston A Price article which served to spur me to keep seeking with this vast web site. There’s a wealth of valuable information to try to grasp within.

    Stumbled up this and found it interesting and may be of interest for this forum as well.

    westonaprice wrote:
    DIGESTION AND THE SKIN

    The health of the skin and the gut are intimately linked; after all, the lining of the gut is a special type of skin, requiring the same nutrients as our external skin—zinc and vitamin D, for example, are the key nutrients for supporting a healthy gut barrier. And a healthy gut is lined with a biofilm made up of billions of beneficial bacteria, just as healthy skin is home to a variety of bacteria, most of them beneficial.

    When undigested proteins, pathogens and toxins pass through the gut—which happens constantly in those with poor gut integrity, the so-called “leaky gut”—they can no longer be eliminated through the feces, and must be vectored to our back-up organ of elimination, the skin. Recovery from rashes and skin lesions often calls for a very restricted diet, such as the GAPS diet, along with cod liver oil, plenty of butter, gelatinous bone broths and lacto-fermented foods needed to restore gut health. As the gut heals, so will the skin.

    Proof that gut and skin health are linked comes from studies of infants. Infants with poor intestinal flora often develop eczema. A study from Sweden showed that children with only a limited variety of bacteria in their feces one week after birth more often developed atopical eczema by the age of eighteen months.15 A diversified intestinal flora seems to be better at stimulating the immune defense. The composition of a child’s bacteria flora is dependent on the mother’s microflora since she is the primary source for the child’s bacteria at the onset. Another clue: acne and other skin problems often show up after a course of antibiotics. If you must take a course of antibiotics, be sure to follow up with plenty of lacto-fermented foods, and possibly a probiotic supplement. This ounce of prevention may prevent a ton of unpleasant skin problems later on.

    Looks like we all have our work cut out for us in navigating our way to a better state of health.

    God bless you all

    #86920

    Tsunny
    Member
    Topics: 34
    Replies: 94

    Since a yeast/fungal infection skin infection determined my yeast problem and I have been following the strict diet for about 3-4 weeks now, should I try this GAPS diet to promote healthy gut? I haven’t looked into it much yet but wanted to ask? Also, I was wondering about anti-inflammatory diet? Would that help?

    #86921

    s.
    Member
    Topics: 12
    Replies: 80

    Maybe in the long, long term. If you have candida overgrowth, I’d stick with Able and Raster’s diet for the now. The GAPS diet has really scary food choices in it – but I’m not you! 🙂 You’ll have to decide that for yourself……

    #86927

    Javizy
    Member
    Topics: 20
    Replies: 945

    I’ve heard a lot of horror stories about GAPS. People seem to destroy their metabolisms and wreck their hormones. It’s possible on any strict diet depending how you go about it though, and not always the fault of the diet itself exactly. I think getting too focused on digestion can lead you to blindside more important things. If you destroy your metabolism, for example, all the supplements, thorough chewing and bone broth in the world won’t improve your digestion, so it’s worth taking a holistic view of things. Adding some gelatin and organ meats to your diet like GAPS and WAPF suggest is a good idea though. They have some good amino acids that help balance out the ones you get from an excess of eggs and muscle meats, not to mention all the micronutrients. Liver once a week is great for your thyroid!

    #86930

    benc
    Member
    Topics: 67
    Replies: 419

    Javizy wrote: I’m starting to lose faith in supplements in general, although some are hard to avoid (vitamin D).

    Me too, once this is all over, I will stick to the essentials of decent Multi VIt, D3, Zinc, Magensium, probiotic, & C (when I feel I need a top up)

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