making kraut?

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This topic contains 12 replies, has 5 voices, and was last updated by  yisucks 4 years, 5 months ago.

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  • #121391

    yisucks
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    Anyone have any recommendations of how to easily do this? Any kits folks recommend, etc?

    #121392

    Rabelais
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    I might be ignorant, but I assume you mean Sauerkraut. I just buy my Sauerkraut at the grocery.

    I might be missing your point, I guess…

    #121393

    TheXtremisT
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    Well obviously he means sauerkraut. I don’t know about which kits are good, as I need a recommendation myself. I know Danny on here makes his own.

    If you do buy from a store, just make sure it is unpasteurised, otherwise the good bacteria are all killed.

    #121394

    yisucks
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    Yes, Sauerkraut, and I want to make, not buy. The only kind with sea salt and no vinegar is pasteurized…

    #121396

    Rabelais
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    Eh… pasteurized???

    I never knew that pasteurized Sauerkraut even exists! Would that be the kind that you only have to heat in order to eat it?

    I only know the “raw” kind, which you have to prepare and boil yourself.

    Rabelais

    #121397

    TheXtremisT
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    That’s weird I’ve never heard of having to boil it yourself?

    They come pasteurised more often than not, just to kill off the bacteria so it can be stored in jars at the supermarket for longer, unlike yoghurt.

    Whenever sauerkraut is heated, it’s killing the beneficial bacteria which is one of the best probiotics known to man. It defeats the main purpose for eating it.

    Obviously it will still bring great benefits such as A and D vitamins released by the fermentation process, but you really want the bacteria alive so they can kill candida in the gut and still produce the good by-products for your body.

    #121398

    Henschy
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    Hello Yi,

    I would recommend something like this:
    https://www.foodpreservationmethods.com/sauerkraut-kimchi-pickles-relishes/sauerkraut/fermenting-glass-jar

    It will let the expanding air out, without letting in new, it will remove the need for you to always have to open it and let it burp once each day or so. Very handy. Also I’ve seen some places also sell two stone/clay halfcircle weights that you can slide down through the opening and that weighs down the kraut below the brine so it doesn’t mold. Other than that it might be good to have 2 jar sets so you can rotate and always make new, and you might need more, depending on how much/fast you plan to eat it once you get accustomed to it. Otherwise I suppose you can get bigger jars as long as that lid fits, and the weights if you decide to get those.

    Henschy

    #121399

    Rabelais
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    TheXtremisT;59918 wrote: They come pasteurised more often than not, just to kill off the bacteria so it can be stored in jars at the supermarket for longer, unlike yoghurt.

    This sounds very, very uncommon to me.

    I even looked up Sauerkraut on Wikipedia to make sure you are talking about the same stuff as I am.

    From this Wikipedia article, I read that Sauerkraut has been fermented by lactic-acid bacteria, giving it its distinctive sour flavour. This fermentation process also makes sure that Sauerkraut can be stored for long times (months) without the need for refridgeration – which once was the primary reason for creating the stuff in the first place.

    This ability to store Sauerkraut for long times means that pasteurization is not necessary. Also, pasteurization may kill most of the bacteria you seem to be looking for.

    About boiling Sauerkraut: that’s the way it is traditionally consumed in my country. It is then a main course. You may also use it as a side dish, without it having been heated. Even then, of course, pasteurization is not needed.

    Note that Sauerkraut was used as one of the main foods during winter and early spring by most of the population during the middle ages, and by travelling salesmen and armies alike during the entire year – without any pasteurization. For the same reason yoghurt is never pasteurized, Sauerkraut needs no pasteurization either.

    Rabelais

    #121400

    kodaz2005
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    Topics: 37
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    Hi Yi,

    I purchased this jar system below. It has a way of releasing the gases through the chamber shown at the top. I liked the idea that since this is 1 gallon size I would force myself to make a lot of it and would therefor need to eat it. 🙂

    You should get some glass mason jars to store the kraut once it is completed so you can start a new batch. The longer you ferment the cabbage, the more effective the bacteria. So you definitely want to get it out of the large jar and into the mason jars, so the new batch can ferment longer.
    If you don’t get a system like the pickelmeister, you should figure out a way to get a cover for your jar that can release the gases.

    It’s not entirely bad to buy some sauerkraut from reputable health stores as long as it is Raw and not pasteurized. Whole foods has several different brands that are raw and sometimes they can be had for a decent price. The have several that have just cabbage, salt, water and some other sea vegetables.

    http://www.amazon.com/The-Picklemeister-Glass-Fermentation-Gallon/dp/B00H8GYOWY

    #121401

    TheXtremisT
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    Topics: 12
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    Rabelais;59920 wrote:

    They come pasteurised more often than not, just to kill off the bacteria so it can be stored in jars at the supermarket for longer, unlike yoghurt.

    This sounds very, very uncommon to me.

    I even looked up Sauerkraut on Wikipedia to make sure you are talking about the same stuff as I am.

    From this Wikipedia article, I read that Sauerkraut has been fermented by lactic-acid bacteria, giving it its distinctive sour flavour. This fermentation process also makes sure that Sauerkraut can be stored for long times (months) without the need for refridgeration – which once was the primary reason for creating the stuff in the first place.

    This ability to store Sauerkraut for long times means that pasteurization is not necessary. Also, pasteurization may kill most of the bacteria you seem to be looking for.

    About boiling Sauerkraut: that’s the way it is traditionally consumed in my country. It is then a main course. You may also use it as a side dish, without it having been heated. Even then, of course, pasteurization is not needed.

    Note that Sauerkraut was used as one of the main foods during winter and early spring by most of the population during the middle ages, and by travelling salesmen and armies alike during the entire year – without any pasteurization. For the same reason yoghurt is never pasteurized, Sauerkraut needs no pasteurization either.

    Rabelais

    I love the way you respond to people on here, very condescending.

    It doesn’t matter whether it needs pasteurisation, it comes that way in most supermarkets and is very commonly processed into jars that way.

    It is done to keep an even longer shelf-life, so therefore it is done for long-term selling in supermarkets. Just because it isn’t done in your country doesn’t mean that what I’m saying is “wrong”.

    I bought some pasteurised sauerkraut last year and it said use by 2015. Unpasteurised doesn’t last that long. It will spoil way before then.

    And obviously I am talking about sauerkraut as well.

    I suggest you check your attitude at the door before posting on things you don’t know everything about.

    #121666

    yisucks
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    Topics: 131
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    Thanks kodaz! That’s really helpful. How long do you let it sit for? How mu h do u make at once? Do u have a recipe? Doing this makes me nervous…I’m afraid I’ll infect it or something!

    #121669

    kodaz2005
    Member
    Topics: 37
    Replies: 172

    yisucks;60187 wrote: Thanks kodaz! That’s really helpful. How long do you let it sit for? How mu h do u make at once? Do u have a recipe? Doing this makes me nervous…I’m afraid I’ll infect it or something!

    Sure, you’re welcome. 🙂

    My last batch, I let it ferment for 2 weeks. I really just stick to the basics when making my sauerkraut. I use only cabbage and salt. I normally cut it up fine with just a knife, but for the next batch I plan on trying a food processor to chop it up fine, as it’s way too much work creating a large gallon jar of it.

    Once you have it chopped up, you mix in sea salt with it. Then you have to put a lot of physical pressure on the cabbage with your hands or use some type of tool to do the same. The goal is to get the “brine” in the cabbage to come out. Once you have done this you have the ingredients you need for the cabbage to ferment into healthy bacteria. It requires both the salt & brine. Some people like to mix in sea vegetables like sea weed, ginger or other spices, but I never bother. I eat it purely for the positive health benefits. So, it’s not something I overly enjoy eating.

    You may want to try making cabbage juice as well. I have found it’s a lot easier to make and most recommendations for fermentation time are about 3 days. Go on youtube and you’ll find tons of videos with step by step instructions for both. good luck.

    #121682

    yisucks
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    Topics: 131
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    Thank you so much…gonna give it a try soon.from what I’ve read it contains trillions of good bacteria compared to the billions I get in capsule form. Big difference!

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