Leaky Gut Treatment, help please!

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This topic contains 18 replies, has 7 voices, and was last updated by  teenies 7 years, 3 months ago.

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  • #72588

    teenies
    Member
    Topics: 7
    Replies: 16

    I know many people here suffer from leaky gut as well. Many of the treatments that help repair the leak such as Omega-3, L-Gultamine, Kefir etc are high in amines. Lots of people suffering from leaky gut are sensitive to amines so what is everyone else taking to repair their gut?
    This is very confusing. Please help!

    #72590

    dvjorge
    Participant
    Topics: 283
    Replies: 1369

    teenies wrote: I know many people here suffer from leaky gut as well. Many of the treatments that help repair the leak such as Omega-3, L-Gultamine, Kefir etc are high in amines. Lots of people suffering from leaky gut are sensitive to amines so what is everyone else taking to repair their gut?
    This is very confusing. Please help!

    There are a lot of supplements that can help to repair the intestinal lining.
    The first thing is to correct what is causing it including chronic stress.
    If you have a pathogenic overgrowth in the intestines or an intolerance such as gluten intolerance the lining won’t repair until you addressed it.

    Slyppery Elm.
    Aloe Vera
    Omega 3
    N Acetyl Cysteine.
    DGL
    Vitamin E
    L. Glutamine.
    N.A.G
    Colostrum
    Bee Pollen
    Probiotics
    Prebiotics
    L-Histedine
    Stevia Extract

    #72594

    mygutleaks
    Participant
    Topics: 47
    Replies: 166

    i am taking Seacure, a predigested white fish. It’s very high in Omega 3’s. It got good reviews from people with leaky gut. i’ve been on it one month but haven’t seen any improvement. am also taking slippery elm.

    #72600

    Thomas
    Member
    Topics: 71
    Replies: 605

    dvjorge wrote: [

    The first thing is to correct what is causing it including chronic stress.
    If you have a pathogenic overgrowth in the intestines or an intolerance such as gluten intolerance the lining won’t repair until you addressed it.

    Hi Dvjorge!

    you point nicely out the problems I am having. For over a year I am trying to figure out my symptoms. I wonder why that is so hard to do for me or for the doctors. Lets say I wake up with a terrible feeling in my body and start to think back and figured out that I was drinking a lot of alcohol last night I know…ah that is hanging together. Now I can make a plan. If I keep drinking I keep suffering, if I stop drinking so much I feel better.

    When I started to feel real bad I went to the mission to find out. But after a year I am more confused then when I started. What really kills me is not knowing how these symptoms come and go. There is no logical pattern in it.

    I believe that I have cross problems. There is candida but there is too food sensitivities where I react in an allergic manner. Being on the candida diet I might reduce the candida but might react all the time to some of the food or the antifungals. Or have reactions to to the entire process with internal stress, too much histamin or adrenalin pushed into my system while loosing very much weight. Or the stress and the toxins, whatever.

    In my case I didnt see a nice pattern like with my wife. We wrote a food diary. And figured nicely and pretty straight forward out over the course of some month what she was reacting too. After two years on the allergic free diet with our own cooking book. She was totally healed after two years. Now she can do what you are longing for. She can live a diet free life. Not being trapped forever to watch what she eats. I on the other hand had a food diary for one year on and off now and didnt see a pattern. I only figured out that I get inflammation in my joints and heavy muscle reactions eating rye. Some breads are ok but then it culminates. If I stop eating rye the symptoms disappear. I noticed too that I have some kind of reaction to potatoes. Some reaction to milk products. But all the time when I stop eating them I don’t get hundred percent clear and good. Which would make sense if its only an allergie or food reaction.

    Here I came to the candida where all this would fit logical and moved all out into the meat eating avoiding carbs. But low and behold I didnt improve either. Always I feel good for a week and then the shit comes back on me. I got so tired of the battle that I stopped with everything even living healthy. When I had again a terrible body reaction I thought what the heck I feel anyhow shit, lets have a coffee. First I felt the hot in the stomach, then I had a feeling something was going on in a better way in the stomach and my poison feeling in the body disappeared for some hours. I thought cool, what are these chemical processes. Next time I feel shit I am going to have a coffee. Said and done and what….it didn’t work I only got stomach pain. Same was with every thing I did, it had some chemical impact but turned bitter after some hours and days and everything was back in the shit.

    The doctors find nothing. Even they say that the skin around my anus looks like it was torched or burned with boiling water. They dont see something wrong with me. I have a lot of symptoms but they say I am OK. I am planning to save up some money to do a ELISA food allergie test first. Then a candida test and then a malnutrition test, leaky gut etc. If I know what food I am allergic I can exclude that from my candida allowed food list and see where I land.

    I found it very difficult to avoid the stress factors. What do you think about this confusion of cross-problems and have you found for yourself a battle plan how to mount that horse for battle?

    cheers
    Thomas

    #72617

    teenies
    Member
    Topics: 7
    Replies: 16

    Thomas wrote:
    When I started to feel real bad I went to the mission to find out. But after a year I am more confused then when I started. What really kills me is not knowing how these symptoms come and go. There is no logical pattern in it.

    Thomas,
    I’ve stuggling with food intolerances too for over a year. I kept a food diary, tried to stay consistant with the foods I ate, eliminated everything that was said to be bad for me and only ate what was “allowed” on the many diets I was on (RPAH, low-FODMAP, SCD, Candida, etc). However I only became slightly less symptomatic on these diets and didn’t feel like I was healing my gut. It wasn’t until I took an IGG food intolerance blood test that looked at over 200 different foods that I was able to determine that I was actually intolerant to a lot of the “allowed” foods including eggs, legumes and almonds. My diet was filled with these foods. I had no idea because I wasn’t showing any classic symptoms of intolerance with these foods but I was still an irritating my gut. Since having the test done and removing the offending foods from my diet, I felt a lot better. I repeated the IGG blood test and since removing the foods from my diet, the intolerance score dramatically reduced.
    Another gem that I learned about food intolerance and reactions is not to blame the last meal for your symptoms. For some reason, food compounds are flushed out of the intestines and into the blood stream when a new meal is eaten and the digestive system becomes active. This explains why the food diary method so slightly flawed.
    Lastly, I find digestive enzymes to help a great deal when dealing with food intolerance symptoms. I know it’s not recommended by some because there are elements in these enzymes that feed the candida but it’s been a lifesaver for me.

    #72619

    Thomas
    Member
    Topics: 71
    Replies: 605

    teenies wrote:

    When I started to feel real bad I went to the mission to find out. But after a year I am more confused then when I started. What really kills me is not knowing how these symptoms come and go. There is no logical pattern in it.

    Thomas,
    I’ve stuggling with food intolerances too for over a year. I kept a food diary, tried to stay consistant with the foods I ate, eliminated everything that was said to be bad for me and only ate what was “allowed” on the many diets I was on (RPAH, low-FODMAP, SCD, Candida, etc). However I only became slightly less symptomatic on these diets and didn’t feel like I was healing my gut. It wasn’t until I took an IGG food intolerance blood test that looked at over 200 different foods that I was able to determine that I was actually intolerant to a lot of the “allowed” foods including eggs, legumes and almonds. My diet was filled with these foods. I had no idea because I wasn’t showing any classic symptoms of intolerance with these foods but I was still an irritating my gut. Since having the test done and removing the offending foods from my diet, I felt a lot better. I repeated the IGG blood test and since removing the foods from my diet, the intolerance score dramatically reduced.
    Another gem that I learned about food intolerance and reactions is not to blame the last meal for your symptoms. For some reason, food compounds are flushed out of the intestines and into the blood stream when a new meal is eaten and the digestive system becomes active. This explains why the food diary method so slightly flawed.
    Lastly, I find digestive enzymes to help a great deal when dealing with food intolerance symptoms. I know it’s not recommended by some because there are elements in these enzymes that feed the candida but it’s been a lifesaver for me.

    Dear teenies!
    thank you for your great answer. First of all it gave me some hope doing that test I am planning to do. There are again tons of people saying that ELISA test is not working and they are only sucking money etc. I was quite hopeless caught in the corner and started to feel claustrophobic. Thanks for opening a door for me.
    I would love to learn more from you about the delay of reactions. This was the killer for me. My food diary didn’t work because of that. And yes most of the diets didn’t work. I did them all. I don’t want to hijack the Leaky Gut Treatment Thread but if you like to share with me more about it we could start our own tread about food intolerance and candida?!

    yours
    Thomas

    #72622

    dvjorge
    Participant
    Topics: 283
    Replies: 1369

    Dr. Elmer Cranton, one of the pioneer researcher Drs about candidiasis believes a hypoallergenic diet is more important treating a fungal intestinal overgrowth than a very restrictive yeast feeding diet. His diet allows sweet potatoes, yams, malanga root, and other hypoallergenic moderate/high carbohydrate food. Instead, he doesn’t allow eggs, any milk derived, and other hyper-allergenic food.

    This is another school of thoughts but most of the pioneers Drs who wrote books and diets were pointing clear to avoid any kind of hyper-allergenic food.

    Thomas, if you feel that intolerances can be behind your suffering, I think the test worth every penny. Also, work with a diary and a blood pressure monitor.
    Jorge.

    #72623

    Javizy
    Member
    Topics: 20
    Replies: 945

    An elimination diet doesn’t sound like a bad idea, Thomas. I’ve been a bit worried about eggs, lemon, fish etc since I’ve been eating them too consistently to notice if they’re causing any symptoms. Do you think you could survive 2-3 weeks on mainly vegetables and organic chicken or something? You should be able to find info on elimination diets online.

    Like teenies said, it’s hard to judge what causes a reaction, but if you keep your diet as simple as possible and maintain a thorough food diary, you should be able to spot some of the worst offenders. Seeing ‘sesame oil’ for lunch and ‘skin flare up after lunch’ on three separate days that were spaced 3-5 days apart left me with little doubt about that one.

    Since it’s on topic, I just finished reading Increased Intestinal Permeability aka Leaky Gut Syndrome: The Science of Achieving Digestive Health by Casey Adams. It’s really thorough and explains the mechanics behind leaky gut and gives some good tips for improving the condition. The best thing about it is the amount of scientific research he reviews. A lot of authors just tell you things as if they were fact, and when you look them up you realise you were fooled into believing baseless opinion. For less than £2 it’s well worth checking out.

    One thing mentioned in many of the studies about allergies in that and other books is the benefit of probiotic supplementation. They can really help your native colonies recover themselves, fight off pathogens and help prevent food particles getting where they shouldn’t, all of which contributes towards healing the gut and reducing the severity of reactions. I’d seriously consider starting them if you haven’t already.

    #72627

    Thomas
    Member
    Topics: 71
    Replies: 605

    dvjorge wrote: Dr. Elmer Cranton, one of the pioneer researcher Drs about candidiasis believes a hypoallergenic diet is more important treating a fungal intestinal overgrowth than a very restrictive yeast feeding diet. His diet allows sweet potatoes, yams, malanga root, and other hypoallergenic moderate/high carbohydrate food. Instead, he doesn’t allow eggs, any milk derived, and other hyper-allergenic food.

    This is another school of thoughts but most of the pioneers Drs who wrote books and diets were pointing clear to avoid any kind of hyper-allergenic food.

    Thomas, if you feel that intolerances can be behind your suffering, I think the test worth every penny. Also, work with a diary and a blood pressure monitor.
    Jorge.

    Thank you dvjorge! Do you have a full list of hypoallergenic food for me. You could send it to me not to confuse the other members about the anti candida died and allowed food list. I am interested in experimentation to learn more to read my symptoms. I am pretty sure that food intolerances are a big part of my problem. The blood pressure monitor is a good idea. This could explain to why my blood pressure is always normal when I am at the doctor. I am not eating there but I have the feeling when I eat that my blood pressure is somehow reacting.
    Thank you for the encouragement to take the test. When one checks the internet there is a war outside against and for a test. I found a clinic in Sweden doing the ELISA test, do you consider it the right one?

    cheers
    Thomas

    #72628

    Thomas
    Member
    Topics: 71
    Replies: 605

    Javizy wrote: An elimination diet doesn’t sound like a bad idea, Thomas. I’ve been a bit worried about eggs, lemon, fish etc since I’ve been eating them too consistently to notice if they’re causing any symptoms. Do you think you could survive 2-3 weeks on mainly vegetables and organic chicken or something? You should be able to find info on elimination diets online.

    Like teenies said, it’s hard to judge what causes a reaction, but if you keep your diet as simple as possible and maintain a thorough food diary, you should be able to spot some of the worst offenders. Seeing ‘sesame oil’ for lunch and ‘skin flare up after lunch’ on three separate days that were spaced 3-5 days apart left me with little doubt about that one.

    Since it’s on topic, I just finished reading Increased Intestinal Permeability aka Leaky Gut Syndrome: The Science of Achieving Digestive Health by Casey Adams. It’s really thorough and explains the mechanics behind leaky gut and gives some good tips for improving the condition. The best thing about it is the amount of scientific research he reviews. A lot of authors just tell you things as if they were fact, and when you look them up you realise you were fooled into believing baseless opinion. For less than £2 it’s well worth checking out.

    One thing mentioned in many of the studies about allergies in that and other books is the benefit of probiotic supplementation. They can really help your native colonies recover themselves, fight off pathogens and help prevent food particles getting where they shouldn’t, all of which contributes towards healing the gut and reducing the severity of reactions. I’d seriously consider starting them if you haven’t already.

    Dear Javizy, thank you for posting your comment to me. I have no problem holding any type of diet but after a while when I dont see a pattern I give up. When I say I give up that is not said that I give up after a week. My first tries where several month. I started to cut out first. I took out entire groups. I was not eating any wheat for over 6 month, no milk products for over 3 month. No coffee and other poisons like alcohol for over 6 month. I can live only on water and vegetables for month only to check out how it goes. BUT when i did it I felt not much better often worse than eating ALL. I believe this has to do with a combination of die-off, food intolerance reaction, leaky gut and a process of desensibilitation. I even tried having one week only water, then eating only one food a day. But I believe when I lost a lot of weight in that time, I released a lot of toxins in my fat, which got burned up. Candida dying released toxins etc too. I really dont know, I feel like lost in the forest and the only thing holding me up is the plan I have to go and take a test.

    Thank you for the book tip I am going to check it out. Yes I am taking probiotica. I have the feeling my body reacts in a strong way with die-off or whatever that reaction is. Something is going on in my body which feels like a battle. Drawing down on antifungals and stopping with probiotics gave me a break. I started again with probiotics but slower now, not so many.

    all the best
    thomas

    #72632

    dvjorge
    Participant
    Topics: 283
    Replies: 1369

    Thomas wrote:

    Dr. Elmer Cranton, one of the pioneer researcher Drs about candidiasis believes a hypoallergenic diet is more important treating a fungal intestinal overgrowth than a very restrictive yeast feeding diet. His diet allows sweet potatoes, yams, malanga root, and other hypoallergenic moderate/high carbohydrate food. Instead, he doesn’t allow eggs, any milk derived, and other hyper-allergenic food.

    This is another school of thoughts but most of the pioneers Drs who wrote books and diets were pointing clear to avoid any kind of hyper-allergenic food.

    Thomas, if you feel that intolerances can be behind your suffering, I think the test worth every penny. Also, work with a diary and a blood pressure monitor.
    Jorge.

    Thank you dvjorge! Do you have a full list of hypoallergenic food for me. You could send it to me not to confuse the other members about the anti candida died and allowed food list. I am interested in experimentation to learn more to read my symptoms. I am pretty sure that food intolerances are a big part of my problem. The blood pressure monitor is a good idea. This could explain to why my blood pressure is always normal when I am at the doctor. I am not eating there but I have the feeling when I eat that my blood pressure is somehow reacting.
    Thank you for the encouragement to take the test. When one checks the internet there is a war outside against and for a test. I found a clinic in Sweden doing the ELISA test, do you consider it the right one?

    cheers
    Thomas

    Here is a list and some tips. Keep in mind that a hypoallergenic diet doesn’t agree with a popular anticandida diet.
    I believe the ELISA test is a good option.

    http://www.gaianaturopathic.com/docs/hypoallergenic_diet.pdf
    Jorge.

    #72633

    Thomas
    Member
    Topics: 71
    Replies: 605

    dvjorge wrote:

    Dr. Elmer Cranton, one of the pioneer researcher Drs about candidiasis believes a hypoallergenic diet is more important treating a fungal intestinal overgrowth than a very restrictive yeast feeding diet. His diet allows sweet potatoes, yams, malanga root, and other hypoallergenic moderate/high carbohydrate food. Instead, he doesn’t allow eggs, any milk derived, and other hyper-allergenic food.

    This is another school of thoughts but most of the pioneers Drs who wrote books and diets were pointing clear to avoid any kind of hyper-allergenic food.

    Thomas, if you feel that intolerances can be behind your suffering, I think the test worth every penny. Also, work with a diary and a blood pressure monitor.
    Jorge.

    Thank you dvjorge! Do you have a full list of hypoallergenic food for me. You could send it to me not to confuse the other members about the anti candida died and allowed food list. I am interested in experimentation to learn more to read my symptoms. I am pretty sure that food intolerances are a big part of my problem. The blood pressure monitor is a good idea. This could explain to why my blood pressure is always normal when I am at the doctor. I am not eating there but I have the feeling when I eat that my blood pressure is somehow reacting.
    Thank you for the encouragement to take the test. When one checks the internet there is a war outside against and for a test. I found a clinic in Sweden doing the ELISA test, do you consider it the right one?

    cheers
    Thomas

    Here is a list and some tips. Keep in mind that a hypoallergenic diet doesn’t agree with an anticandida diet.
    I believe the ELISA test is a good option.

    http://www.gaianaturopathic.com/docs/hypoallergenic_diet.pdf
    Jorge.

    Thank you Jorge. I am currently not on the diet. I am testing everything and keep the best. Thanks for the pdf and the thumps up for the ELISA test.

    yours
    Thomas

    #72641

    raster
    Participant
    Topics: 104
    Replies: 6838

    Raster’s tips to heal leaky gut:

    Foods high in FOS (oat bran, artichokes, etc)
    Inulin (aka miracle fiber) contains FOS as well; add it to your foods
    Grape bitters (or other bitters)
    Digestive enzymes (I take one called pro-gest)
    Cinnamon pearls
    Glutamine (to treat sugar intolerance)

    reducing inflammation (fermented cod liver oil)
    or anti-inflammatory foods (broccoli, salmon, etc)

    -raster

    #72660

    CT
    Member
    Topics: 12
    Replies: 63

    Thomas wrote: Thank you Jorge. I am currently not on the diet. I am testing everything and keep the best. Thanks for the pdf and the thumps up for the ELISA test.

    yours
    Thomas

    Sorry if my post is going to confuse things…I don’t know what the ELISA test is specifically, but please research its validity and reliability before taking it. When I researched food intolerance only two main tests that were recommended over and over in different sources were either a hydrogen breath test or a food elimination diet.

    Lactose intolerance: hydrogen breath test (consume a lactose liquid)
    Fructose malabsorption: hydrogen breath test (consume fructose liquid)
    wheat intolerance: Not sure how this is tested??

    Cealiac disease: Blood test

    From all the research I did when I was investigating food intolerance I don’t think that there is a test that can effectively test for all 3 or more intolerances at once. It may be more beneficial to begin a food elimination diet so you can narrow down the choices to one you think it could possibly be. One way is to pick a food intolerance you think it could be and rule out this food group for a month and see how things go if there is no improvement add that food group back in and eliminate a different food group.

    Good luck!

    #72668

    Javizy
    Member
    Topics: 20
    Replies: 945

    I’ve read negative things about ELISA too. I think it’s covered in that book.

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