L. Plantarum effect on candida albicans

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This topic contains 5 replies, has 3 voices, and was last updated by  Danny33 4 years, 11 months ago.

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  • #117547

    dvjorge
    Participant
    Topics: 283
    Replies: 1368

    Abstract
    An anaerobic three-vessel continuous-flow culture
    system, which models the three major anatomical
    regions of the human colon, was used to study the
    persistence of Candida albicans in the presence of a
    faecal microbiota. During steady state conditions,
    overgrowth of C. albicans was prevented by
    commensal bacteria indigenous to the system.
    However antibiotics, such as tetracycline have the
    ability to disrupt the bacterial populations within the
    gut. Thus, colonization resistance can be
    compromised and overgrowth of undesirable
    microorganisms like C. albicans can then occur. In this
    study, growth of C. albicans was not observed in the
    presence of an established faecal microbiota. However,
    following the addition of tetracycline to the growth
    medium, significant growth of C. albicans occurred. A
    probiotic Lactobacillus plantarum LPK culture was
    added to the system to investigate whether this
    organism had any effects upon the Candida
    populations. Although C. albicans was not completely
    eradicated in the presence of this bacterium, cell
    counts were markedly reduced, indicating a
    compromised physiological function. This study
    shows that the normal gut flora can exert ‘natural’
    resistance to C. albicans, however this may be
    diminished during antibiotic intake. The use of
    probiotics can help fortify natural resistance.

    #117562

    Danny33
    Member
    Topics: 25
    Replies: 362

    dvjorge;56068 wrote: Abstract
    An anaerobic three-vessel continuous-flow culture
    system, which models the three major anatomical
    regions of the human colon, was used to study the
    persistence of Candida albicans in the presence of a
    faecal microbiota. During steady state conditions,
    overgrowth of C. albicans was prevented by
    commensal bacteria indigenous to the system.
    However antibiotics, such as tetracycline have the
    ability to disrupt the bacterial populations within the
    gut. Thus, colonization resistance can be
    compromised and overgrowth of undesirable
    microorganisms like C. albicans can then occur. In this
    study, growth of C. albicans was not observed in the
    presence of an established faecal microbiota. However,
    following the addition of tetracycline to the growth
    medium, significant growth of C. albicans occurred. A
    probiotic Lactobacillus plantarum LPK culture was
    added to the system to investigate whether this
    organism had any effects upon the Candida
    populations. Although C. albicans was not completely
    eradicated in the presence of this bacterium, cell
    counts were markedly reduced, indicating a
    compromised physiological function. This study
    shows that the normal gut flora can exert ‘natural’
    resistance to C. albicans, however this may be
    diminished during antibiotic intake. The use of
    probiotics can help fortify natural resistance.

    L. Plantarum is also one of the main species in natural sauerkraut fermentation.
    It’s also noted in the below source, its commonly THE MOST popular species in sauerkraut!

    DNA Fingerprinting of Lactic Acid Bacteria in Sauerkraut Fermentations

    I still think fermented veggies are FAR superior to milk based ferments.

    During the sauerkraut fermentation, there is a rapid turnover of LAB species. The dominant species present in the fermentation shifts within 2 to 3 days from less-acid-tolerant heterolactic LAB species to more-acid-tolerant homolactic fermenting LAB species, with the sequential populations each reaching concentrations of 108 to 109 CFU/g (11). Under normal conditions, the fermentation is essentially complete within 2 weeks, with the most-acid-tolerant species, L. plantarum, predominating. Our objective was to characterize the dominant LAB species in the successive stages of fermentation.

    #117565

    Vegan Catlady
    Member
    Topics: 34
    Replies: 626

    Danny33;56083 wrote:

    I still think fermented veggies are FAR superior to milk based ferments.

    During the sauerkraut fermentation, there is a rapid turnover of LAB species. The dominant species present in the fermentation shifts within 2 to 3 days from less-acid-tolerant heterolactic LAB species to more-acid-tolerant homolactic fermenting LAB species, with the sequential populations each reaching concentrations of 108 to 109 CFU/g (11). Under normal conditions, the fermentation is essentially complete within 2 weeks, with the most-acid-tolerant species, L. plantarum, predominating. Our objective was to characterize the dominant LAB species in the successive stages of fermentation.

    I do NO milk-based ferments for obvious reasons, but I always wanted to understand better the role of bacteria in fermented veggies.
    For instance, I have a jar of sauerkraut at home, but havent touched it yet because im not convinced,due to processing, that it actually contains any bacteria.
    Eden Organic- http://www.edenfoods.com/store/product_info.php?cPath=23_40&products_id=103900&eID=4nc3lno4nv8ul63lpo9db02si6

    It seems to avoid that advertising,lol, that there is beneficial bacteria…

    So I guess my question is: can processing keep bacteria out, or does the act of fermenting foods imply they wouldnt process it in a way that would kill what you might be eating for?

    You seem to be the perfect person to ask here.

    #117762

    Danny33
    Member
    Topics: 25
    Replies: 362

    Vegan Catlady;56086 wrote:

    I still think fermented veggies are FAR superior to milk based ferments.

    During the sauerkraut fermentation, there is a rapid turnover of LAB species. The dominant species present in the fermentation shifts within 2 to 3 days from less-acid-tolerant heterolactic LAB species to more-acid-tolerant homolactic fermenting LAB species, with the sequential populations each reaching concentrations of 108 to 109 CFU/g (11). Under normal conditions, the fermentation is essentially complete within 2 weeks, with the most-acid-tolerant species, L. plantarum, predominating. Our objective was to characterize the dominant LAB species in the successive stages of fermentation.

    I do NO milk-based ferments for obvious reasons, but I always wanted to understand better the role of bacteria in fermented veggies.
    For instance, I have a jar of sauerkraut at home, but havent touched it yet because im not convinced,due to processing, that it actually contains any bacteria.
    Eden Organic- http://www.edenfoods.com/store/product_info.php?cPath=23_40&products_id=103900&eID=4nc3lno4nv8ul63lpo9db02si6

    It seems to avoid that advertising,lol, that there is beneficial bacteria…

    So I guess my question is: can processing keep bacteria out, or does the act of fermenting foods imply they wouldnt process it in a way that would kill what you might be eating for?

    You seem to be the perfect person to ask here.

    VC,

    Most conventional sauerkraut (e.g Eden Organic) is heated (pasteurized) to a specific temperature to kill any living organisms that may be present. It might be tasty but it’s completely dead.

    You may be able to find raw unpasteurized sauerkraut (e.g Beagle Bay) at health food stores. Thats a step up from normal store bought kraut but still not the real thing. These companies add a few basic species of lactic acid bacteria for fermentation. These species are similar to what you would find in typical store bought yogurt. They have minor benefits and are only temporary in the gut.

    Organic cabbage is going to have dozens of beneficial soil based bacteria species living on it’s leaves.
    Making homemade sauerkraut is the only way to do it IMO. It’s cheaper, taste better, and will recruit permanent beneficial residents in our intestines.

    I ferment 5 pounds of organic cabbage every two weeks. I honestly believe this is by far the most significant part of my diet. I’ve got cabbage mastered so I’m looking into other veggies to try out.
    I made homemade milk kefir for years, kombucha for months, and those don’t come even close to sauerkraut.

    FYI, I ordered my ferment stuff from culturesforhealth.com if you are interested.

    -D

    #118025

    Vegan Catlady
    Member
    Topics: 34
    Replies: 626

    Danny33;56283 wrote:
    VC,

    Most conventional sauerkraut (e.g Eden Organic) is heated (pasteurized) to a specific temperature to kill any living organisms that may be present. It might be tasty but it’s completely dead.

    You may be able to find raw unpasteurized sauerkraut (e.g Beagle Bay) at health food stores. Thats a step up from normal store bought kraut but still not the real thing. These companies add a few basic species of lactic acid bacteria for fermentation. These species are similar to what you would find in typical store bought yogurt. They have minor benefits and are only temporary in the gut.

    Organic cabbage is going to have dozens of beneficial soil based bacteria species living on it’s leaves.
    Making homemade sauerkraut is the only way to do it IMO. It’s cheaper, taste better, and will recruit permanent beneficial residents in our intestines.

    I ferment 5 pounds of organic cabbage every two weeks. I honestly believe this is by far the most significant part of my diet. I’ve got cabbage mastered so I’m looking into other veggies to try out.
    I made homemade milk kefir for years, kombucha for months, and those don’t come even close to sauerkraut.

    [h]FYI, I ordered my ferment stuff from culturesforhealth.com if you are interested.[/h]

    -D

    Thank you for this info.

    Im a bit intimidated to try fermenting my own kraut, but I was intimidated to brew my own beer too so I think I can do this.

    I might give it a try, the only place I can get organic cabbage is Wholefoods, have you ever made purple kraut before?

    #118031

    Danny33
    Member
    Topics: 25
    Replies: 362

    Vegan Catlady;56546 wrote:

    VC,

    Most conventional sauerkraut (e.g Eden Organic) is heated (pasteurized) to a specific temperature to kill any living organisms that may be present. It might be tasty but it’s completely dead.

    You may be able to find raw unpasteurized sauerkraut (e.g Beagle Bay) at health food stores. Thats a step up from normal store bought kraut but still not the real thing. These companies add a few basic species of lactic acid bacteria for fermentation. These species are similar to what you would find in typical store bought yogurt. They have minor benefits and are only temporary in the gut.

    Organic cabbage is going to have dozens of beneficial soil based bacteria species living on it’s leaves.
    Making homemade sauerkraut is the only way to do it IMO. It’s cheaper, taste better, and will recruit permanent beneficial residents in our intestines.

    I ferment 5 pounds of organic cabbage every two weeks. I honestly believe this is by far the most significant part of my diet. I’ve got cabbage mastered so I’m looking into other veggies to try out.
    I made homemade milk kefir for years, kombucha for months, and those don’t come even close to sauerkraut.

    [h]FYI, I ordered my ferment stuff from culturesforhealth.com if you are interested.[/h]

    -D

    Thank you for this info.

    Im a bit intimidated to try fermenting my own kraut, but I was intimidated to brew my own beer too so I think I can do this.

    I might give it a try, the only place I can get organic cabbage is Wholefoods, have you ever made purple kraut before?

    Beer is more difficult.

    Sauerkraut = Cabbage, sea salt

    Cabbage from Wholefoods would work great, lactic acid bacteria are just chilling on the leaves waiting for you to add salt and smash it. I usually mix green and purple cabbage together, its the bomb.
    Fermenting different kinds of veggies (e.g green with purple Cabbage) will encourage microbial diversity. The more the merrier when fixing crippled gut flora 🙂

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