Kefir.! The controversy

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This topic contains 28 replies, has 12 voices, and was last updated by  Bansaw 5 years, 2 months ago.

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  • #114283

    dvjorge
    Participant
    Topics: 283
    Replies: 1369

    Hi all.!

    Kefir has been a very controversial drink for me since I began this battle. I have read many good things about it from reputable sources. In fact, it really is a good nutritional and beneficial beverage we should consume regularly when possible.

    However, for candida sufferers I still have my doubts about it, at least at the beginning of the battle.

    Kefir conatin casein, yeast, and lactose. It is lactose what worries me more. It isn’t true Kefir is 99% lactose free. Lab tests have demonstrated the reduction of milk lactose is only 50% after fermented by Kefir grains. This concentration keeps more or less stable for longer than 3 months of storage.
    Lactose is a tremendous growing factor for candida species and consuming it will feed a fungal intestinal overgrowth.

    There are many websites advising Kefir to battle chronic candidiasis, but there are NOT successful testimonies reported by candida sufferers after drinking it. In fact, there are many reports from people who has gotten worse after drinking it.

    You can react to the yeast present in Kefir, you can also react to Casein or Lactose, and the worse feeding the overgrowth with the present lactose. The alcohol present after Kefir fermentation may cause some trouble for some people too.

    On the other hand, Kefir has shown some antifungal activity against candida albicans and other yeast species. It is also very reach in LAB and lactic acid. I would like to know its real role during an intestinal yeast overgrowth. At least, I would like to read reports from people who are drinking it and still advancing against candidiasis.

    What do you think ???

    Jorge.

    #114284

    Danny33
    Member
    Topics: 25
    Replies: 362

    Jorge,

    2 years ago before I knew yeast was my problem, I had so many digestive issues I decided to try making real kefir from grains. I ordered grains from TheHappyHerbalist and began making goat’s milks kefir for about 13 months. I was not respecting any diet at the time but was drinking kefir daily.

    I have to say that while it didn’t help my regularity/digestion/ constipation at all, it did seem to keep my candida from getting worse. Also, I never got sick while drinking it.

    It believe it’s probably more beneficial then detrimental for candida sufferers. However, I don’t think it will bring significant improvement to individuals with CRC, especially the more sever cases.

    Also to note, I made homemade Kombucha for about a year as well with the same results. To me Kefir, Kombucha, and cultured yogurt seem to help me just as much as a normal pro-biotic capsule. I don’t really notice a big difference. I have taken well over 25 different pharmaceutical pro-biotics.

    The only pro-biotic’s that worked true miracles for me were Threelac and S Boulardii. ThreeLac literally removed 80% of all my symptoms for 3-4 weeks until the yeast built a resistance and then I was back to square one like it never happened. It was very interesting.

    S. Boulardii was working lovely for me. I was regular, more energy, allergies improving. But weeks into my treatment I would get extremely painful skin on random parts of my body. This painful symptom only occurred previously when I was going through bottles of anti-biotics which leads me to believe SB may be antagonistic against not only candida but also my LAB beneficials.

    I say if it makes you feel better, Keep DRINKING.
    If it makes you feel bad, STOP DRINKING!

    -Danny

    #114292

    2tude58
    Member
    Topics: 5
    Replies: 18

    Coconut milk kefir has been my mainstay on this diet. Along with other natural foods that fight candida it keeps the white coating on my tongue away even off the supplements my doc had me on. I figure it may not get rid of all of it yet is helping while I wander through all the medical problems I’m dealing with………

    #114298

    LilDonnie
    Participant
    Topics: 3
    Replies: 15

    I also have my doubts after using kefir. I have been using commercial Goat’s milk kefir that only contains 5 grams of sugar. It def helped me digest better, but it also seemed as if my candida symptoms started to get worse slowly. I have currently stopped using it and am going to try to make my own kefir. If I have the same reaction than I know I shouldn’t use it until later on. Once I have controlled the candida I should be able to use it to keep them away!

    #114301

    yisucks
    Participant
    Topics: 131
    Replies: 331

    My naturopath (also raster’s ND), said no to Kefir until I am much better. I’m not entirely sure of his rationale, but he has like 30 plus years experience with this, and hasn’t steered me wrong yet.

    #114311

    raster
    Participant
    Topics: 104
    Replies: 6838

    I think kefir is very slightly bad like other items like greek yogurt, oat bran, rice, etc. Atleast cow’s milk kefir/yogurt…

    Goat’s milk kefir contains less bad stuff and is generally from a healthier animal.

    At my local store, there is lactose free goat kefir that I tried one time and this might be the best option…I did see candida as one of the strains within it though.

    The main thing to worry about is the caseine in my opinion, this messes up methylation cycles and aids in a cycle that benefits the yeast. The second thing to worry about is whether its from a cow or not. The third thing to worry about is whether it gives you a reaction or not.

    I switched from cows yogurt to goats yogurt recently and feel a ton better in general.

    -raster

    #114312

    LilDonnie
    Participant
    Topics: 3
    Replies: 15

    Raster,
    If you are using the Redwood hills brand yogurt one thing I noticed was the use of tapioca starch in it, it didnt effect me much but I just stopped using it because of this ingredient. Just an FYI!

    And thanks btw for all the info and your blog. I have been reading these forums for about 6 months as well as battling fungus and finally decided to join the conversation.

    Thanks,
    Brendon

    #114317

    raster
    Participant
    Topics: 104
    Replies: 6838

    Yup I am using the redwood hills brand…do they have that in texas too?

    -raster

    #114321

    LilDonnie
    Participant
    Topics: 3
    Replies: 15

    oh yeah they sell it at whole foods, and Natural Grocers here. Addicting stuff. Natural Grocers really has everything you need for this battle I feel like, and its way cheaper than whole foods.

    #114340

    kjones02
    Participant
    Topics: 79
    Replies: 315

    LilDonnie;52833 wrote: Raster,
    If you are using the Redwood hills brand yogurt one thing I noticed was the use of tapioca starch in it, it didnt effect me much but I just stopped using it because of this ingredient. Just an FYI!

    And thanks btw for all the info and your blog. I have been reading these forums for about 6 months as well as battling fungus and finally decided to join the conversation.

    Thanks,
    Brendon

    Yes, I have ate the redwood hills goat yogurt before; it is at my health food store. I think it was much better tolerated than cow. However, you bring up a good point about the tapioca starch. I have thought about trying to make my own. Do you think buying either of these, and starting from there would be okay?

    http://www.iherb.com/Meyenberg-Goat-Milk-Non-Fat-Powdered-Goat-Milk-12-oz-340-g/38796#p=1&oos=1&disc=0&lc=en-US&w=goat%20milk&rc=144&sr=null&ic=2
    http://www.iherb.com/Mt-Capra-CapraMilk-Powdered-Goat-Milk-16-oz-453-g/12345#p=1&oos=1&disc=0&lc=en-US&w=goat%20milk&rc=144&sr=null&ic=4

    I haven’t had dairy again for quite sometime,and miss it. I have thought about trying some goat cheese here at some point.

    One final note, how have had other people made homemade yogurt? My dehydrator said I could do it that way. I don’t have a yogurt machine. I like it thick and creamy, but not too, too thick.

    #114343

    dvjorge
    Participant
    Topics: 283
    Replies: 1369

    To make lactose free Kefir, it is necessary to add the enzyme lactase. Simple sugars such as glucose and galactose after the lactose breaks down are fuel for candida.

    It is a mistake to drink Kefir with an active candida intestinal infection. Until more I research, I realize why people get worse drinking it. I blame many candida dedicated websites for it. They advice Kefir without having any support but the theory.

    See what they do to make a Lactose Free Kefir :

    To create our lactose-free Green Valley Organics yogurt, kefir and sour cream, we add the enzyme lactase. People that are lactose intolerant do not produce this enzyme and therefore cannot digest the milk sugar, lactose, in dairy. When added to the milk the lactase breaks down the lactose into easily digested simple sugars (specifically, glucose and galactose). No chemicals are used and the nutritional composition of the milk is not altered in any way. You still get all of the great taste and good nutrition – calcium, protein, B vitamins – of real dairy. What you don’t get are the unpleasant symptoms of lactose intolerance.

    Lactose amount left after 24 hours of fermentation and 24 hours of storage :

    a There is some room for debate regarding energy value of kefir, which is derived not only from the fat content [which is slightly changed and reduced especially during the initial fermentation with kefir grains, with continual reduction if kefir is ripened at room temperature for a given period], but also from protein and the carbohydrate of ready-to-drink kefir. The majority of digestible carbohydrate of kefir is milk-sugar [lactose], of which at 24 hour fermentation followed by 24 hour storage seems to be approximately 3.5%, going by the figures available. This is about 50% reduction of the original lactose content in fresh milk.

    The lactose amount keeps constant during a long storage period. Those web places claiming leaving Kefir to ferment longer eliminate the lactose are wrong.

    Characteristics and Evolution of Milk Kefir During Storage

    Changes in microbiological, physicochemical, including sensory parameters of kefir were studied during cold storage. Batches of kefir were prepared with 1% and 5% added kefir grains as per the traditional method. Samples for analysis were taken 24 hours after inoculation of fresh milk with kefir grains, followed by 2, 7, 14, 21, and 28 days of the liquid-kefir stored at 4° to 6°C. After fermentation for 24 hours with kefir grains [inoculation], lactobacilli and lactococci were found at levels of 100,000,000 colony forming units per millilitre [cfu/ml]. Yeasts and acetic acid bacteria were present at levels of 100,000 and 1,000,000 cfu/ml, respectively.

    Lactic acid producing microflora decreased by approximately 1.5 log units between days 7 and 14, and stabilised at that level. Yeast and acetic acid bacterial counts, lactose, and pH remained constant over the storage period. However, the total fat content and dry matter decreased. The percentage of kefir-grains for fermentation did exert an influence. Sample batches prepared using 1% added kefir-grains had higher lactic acid bacterial counts, lactose, and pH [not as acidic]. The sample batches prepared with 5% added kefir-grains had higher yeast and acetic acid bacterial counts and viscosity a lower pH [more acidic]. The total fat and dry matter contents were similar in both sample batches.

    #114348

    impossible
    Member
    Topics: 16
    Replies: 606
    #114349

    dvjorge
    Participant
    Topics: 283
    Replies: 1369

    impossible;52869 wrote: http://www.seekinghealth.com/lactase-drops-lactase-enzyme.html

    Yes, but if you add lactase drops to your home made Kefir, the lactose will convert in simple sugars such as glucose and galactose. Both are FUEL for candida. There isn’t way to consume sugar free Kefir. Lactose, glucose, galactose or any other simple sugar FEED candida like crazy.

    Kefir is dangerous for candida sufferers. Two of my old school candida dedicated books alert people about it. They don’t allow Kefir.

    I was almost symptom free and have been drinking a lot of home made Kefir, around 6 cups a day, I am starting to feel light intestinal symptoms again. I am craving Kefir with Stevia.

    My intestinal infection isn’t totally eradicated and Kefir don’t allow more progress.

    Jorge.

    #114350

    impossible
    Member
    Topics: 16
    Replies: 606

    My idea was, would that still be the case if you used it before making kefir? I recommend against kefir, for a few reasons, btw. Im just curious.

    #114352

    dvjorge
    Participant
    Topics: 283
    Replies: 1369

    Where the information Kefir is beneficial for candida sufferers is coming from ??

    I see not other source than candida dedicated non-medical websites. There isn’t evidence, at least to my knowledge, Kefir is providing benefices for candida sufferers. If you browse the web trying to find positive testimonies, you get almost nothing. Maybe an isolated report from someone. However, there are a lot of evidences and reports people get worse drinking Kefir. Curezone archives are full of these reports. So, why Kefir is continuously advised in candida forums and web ??

    We need to stop the myths and advice based on evidence and reports. There aren’t enough evidences Kefir is beneficial for candida sufferers. It looks totally the opposite according to the research and reports.

    To be safe dealing with an intestinal fungal overgrowth, Kefir must be out of the game. At least, until the overgrowth be erradicated.

    Jorge.

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