kefir homemade

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This topic contains 16 replies, has 6 voices, and was last updated by  orka1998 6 years ago.

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  • #94874

    hope4eva77
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    i plan to make my own kefir and from my understanding after straining the grains and milk left out for 24 hrs ,its ready to drink but i read something that says the strained kefir is to sit for another 24 hrs before drinking ,is this correct ?

    #94886

    hope4eva77
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    bump

    #94893

    hope4eva77
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    i plan on using raw milk for my kefir as well but may not always b able to afford this and just use milk without antibiotics .is this ok ?

    #94896

    yeastygut
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    You can drink the kefir immediately, no need to wait another day. That suggestion was probably to add to the effervescence of the kefir and to make it more sour without curdling it. Also although raw milk is the more nutritious milk option, kefir will thrive off of any type of milk (with no added antibiotics/growth hormones). I personally use organic whole or 2% milk from the grocery store. You can also use nut/seed milks.

    #94927

    Danny33
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    Any milk will do great.

    Also, 24 hours is the max you have to wait once your grains are big enough.
    You can also double the grains and have kefir ready in 12 hours if you wanted to.
    The grains grow crazy when taken care of.

    #94941

    UncleOxidant
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    I’m finding that it can take less then 24 hours as well, I guess I’m starting to get a lot of kefir grains.

    Also, Now that I’m making my own I can see why it’s recommended that we make our own. The homemade seems to be much more biologically active in the fridge – I have to make sure I ‘burp’ the bottles every now and then as they do get effervescent, something I didn’t notice in the store-bought kefir.

    I’ve been trying another culture that’s quite easy: Fil Mjölk. I got the culture from http://organic-cultures.com/culture_instructions__recipes/fil_mjolk_yogurt_starter_instructions
    It’s also a room temp culture. Makes the milk a bit thicker than the kefir and the taste is milder. I put some culture in some heavy whipping cream Friday night and by Saturday afternoon it had created this wonderful, thick sour cream.

    #94963

    orka1998
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    I think 24 hour rule is to make sure grains ate all or most of the lactose in milk. I don’t wait another 24 hours, it’s much too sour for my taste. I strain it and drink it right away. My grains didn’t like me changing milk. They get used to the same milk and when I change it, it takes them longer to produce kefir. I use whole milk store bought. Whatever you decide will be your milk, stick to it. In my experience, higher the fat of the milk, tastier the kefir from it.

    Arijana

    #94979

    hope4eva77
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    So from my understanding kefir of grains or milk never need 2 go in fridge? Just leave them out and keep adding milk keeps them alive?

    #94984

    shayfo
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    You only need to refrigerate them if you’re giving them a break because you’re made too much, generally.

    #94985

    shayfo
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    Or if you like it cold.

    #95106

    orka1998
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    Kefir must be fermented at a room temp. Once you strain it, you can put the kefir into fridge to cool it or preserve its current taste (if you leave it out it keeps fermenting further even without the grains). As for grains, their action is greatly reduced if they are refrigerated. This is why you put them in little milk and in the fridge to give them (or yourself) a break from kefir. Just be careful not to do it much to often as they will get “lazy” after a while. They should be “working” every day if possible. If you keep them in the fridge they “work” much slower so you need to change milk every 3-4 days instead of 1-2. The taste will probably be different and usually it’s much to sour for my taste but some people like it that way. I like to taste the fizz in it.

    Arijana

    #95107

    Danny33
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    Keep in mind you want to stick with the same milk all the time.

    Once my grains got used to goat milk everyday I tried to switch to cows milk because its cheaper and the kefir was absolutely disgusting. I would then go back to goats again and the grains made beautiful tasting kefir again.

    #95108

    hope4eva77
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    Thanks Okra so ill keep my grains out at room temp and rotate jars ,i guess when i end up with to much then idk maybe put in fridge like u said with milk .

    Danny damn that sux about not changing milk cuz i really want to use raw milk but the cost of going to buy it is really not affordable its like close to 7$ for a half gallon here .Maybe ill just buy organic milk 4 it ,i really cant wait i am missing milk .i only put coconut milk in bread but dont like 2 drink it .

    #95119

    shayfo
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    Once your grains have reproduced enough after a few weeks, you could probably stick half of them in a different kind of milk, and stick with the original kind in your first jar. My grains came from a friend, and she was using them in goat milk. I’m doing coconut milk, and they seemed to take a few days to transition — and my first batch tasted a little goaty — but now they seem happy in the coconut milk.

    #95228

    orka1998
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    My grains did not like me changing milk and I also sent them to another forum member and she was unable to get it going with raw milk from farm. It probably takes few days to adjust but in the mean time you end up with less than good kefir. IMO it’s not worth it. Find a brand you are happy with and stick to it, that’s my advice. If you want to experiment, then do it with the extra grains and then rest the original ones when you get this one going. You could switch them out from there depending which milk you buy. If you keep switching milk on same grains, you will always end up with some wasted milk, if you get two sets of grains going, then once each is used their own type of milk you will not waste any more milk. Just remember to switch out milk every 3-4 days for the grains that are resting in the fridge.

    Arijana

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