how do you make homemade kefir?

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This topic contains 5 replies, has 5 voices, and was last updated by  princeofsin 6 years, 7 months ago.

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  • #88268

    chausse112
    Member
    Topics: 13
    Replies: 17

    I can’t find the link for making this.

    Also is it a sign of very bad leaky gut if I can’t tolerate fermented foods?

    If so then how do I heal the leaky gut?

    #88272

    raster
    Participant
    Topics: 104
    Replies: 6838

    There are kefir making videos on youtube. The search isn’t working right now but johnny awhile back shared some links to make kefir and purchase grains.

    -raster

    #88288

    Vinci
    Member
    Topics: 15
    Replies: 39

    The way I’ve been making it is:

    1 tbsp kefir grains = l cup water = 1 tbsp sugar

    Left to ferment in a plastic container for 48-72 hours, until it doesn’t taste sweet anymore. Then bottled and kept in the fridge.

    Water = mineral/spring water. Apparently the chlorine in tap water damages the probiotics. Boling tap water removes chlorine.

    Sugar = Raw/unrefined cane sugar. I’ve been using demarara and molasses.

    When changing the grains, I rinse them in a plastic sieve. Apparently the metal on a sieve/spoon damages the probiotics.

    #88291

    Miriam
    Member
    Topics: 8
    Replies: 61

    Hi, Culturesforhealth.com is a great link. Check it out. Miriam

    #88294

    raster
    Participant
    Topics: 104
    Replies: 6838

    I do not recommend storing them in a plastic container because the kefir absorbes some of the plastic.

    -raster

    #88298

    princeofsin
    Member
    Topics: 1
    Replies: 224

    I got this from a site

    “How to Make Kefir with a Direct-set Starter Culture

    Direct-set style powdered Kefir Starter Culture is a great option for people interested in making their own Kefir but who do not want to maintain a set of Milk Kefir Grains. Click here for more information on making Kefir with Milk Kefir Grains. Click here for information on the differences between Direct-set Kefir Cultures and Milk Kefir Grains.

    Equipment:

    One glass jar (pint, quart, or half-gallon)
    A plastic, wood, or stainless steel stirring utensil
    A breathable cover for the jar such as a tight-weave dish towel or paper coffee filter
    A rubber band to secure the cover

    Ingredients:

    Packet of Direct-set Kefir Starter Culture
    1 qt. Milk, Coconut Milk, Coconut Water, or Fruit Juice

    Milk considerations. Pasteurized milk is most commonly used with this culture. Non-homogenzied milk can be used if desired. Ultra-high temperature (UHT) and ultra-pasteurized milk is less likely to culture effectively. Fresh raw milk will typically culture effectively for the initial batch but is difficult to reculture due to bacteria content.

    A note about hygiene. When working with Kefir, it is important not to introduce competing bacteria to the process. Be sure to wash and rinse your hands well prior to working with the milk. Also be sure to thoroughly clean and rinse the container and all utensils that will come in contact with the milk or the starter culture. Beware soap and food residue the dishwasher may have missed. When in doubt, give everything an extra rinse. The culturing container can be cleaned with regular soap and hot water (rinse very well) or with vinegar. Never use bleach on any item that will come in contact with the milk or starter culture.

    How to Make Kefir
    Heat the milk, coconut milk or coconut water to 85-92°F.
    Mix in the starter culture. Be sure to fully incorporate the culture into the liquid.
    Cover the container with a loose lid and allow the mixture to ferment at 72-80°F (see below):
    Ferment for 18-24 hours for animal milk
    Ferment for 18-36 hours for coconut milk
    Ferment for 24-48 hours for coconut water and fruit juice
    Once the fermentation period is complete, shake the kefir vigorously, and place a lid on the container and store the Kefir in the refrigerator.

    Choose a safe spot. An ideal culturing spot should be relatively warm but not excessively so. Temperatures between 72° and 80°F are ideal. The best fermenting spot for Kefir is out of direct sunlight. Indirect light or darkness is neither favorable nor problematic. Be sure the Kefir is not fermenting near any other cultured foods such as kefir, yogurt, sourdough, sauerkraut, etc. In addition, do not culture your Kefir near a garbage can. Cross contamination of stray yeasts and bacteria can be problematic for the Kefir Grains and any other fermented foods you are working with.

    Signs the Kefir is Done Culturing
    Cow or Goat Milk. The culturing process is complete when the milk thickens to the consistency of commercial cultured buttermilk. It will be a pourable liquid and not an “eat with a spoon” level of thickness. The milk will also take on a distinctive sour fragrance.

    Coconut Milk. The coconut milk takes on a distinctive sour, less sweet fragrance. Cultured coconut milk does not thicken reliably like animal milk.

    Coconut Water or Juice. The coconut water and fruit juice becomes cloudy and less sweet.

    Reculturing the Kefir
    Kefir made with a direct-set style starter culture can often be recultured anywhere from 2-7 times. The exact number of successive reculturings will depend on the freshness of the Kefir and hygienic practices employed. We recommend reculturing Kefir within 7 days of making each batch. Longer periods in between batches will decrease the likelihood the new batch will culture successfully. Please note, reculturing is less likely to be effective if raw milk is used due to the bacteria content of the raw milk. If you prefer to use raw milk, we would strongly recommend using Milk Kefir Grains to make your Kefir.

    Reserve ¼ cup of Kefir from a previous batch.
    Thoroughly incorporate the ¼ cup of reserved Kefir into a quart of fresh milk.
    Cover the container with a loose lid and allow the mixture to ferment at 72-80°F (see below):
    Ferment for 18-24 hours for animal milk
    Ferment for 18-36 hours for coconut milk
    Ferment for 24-48 hours for coconut water and fruit juice
    Once the fermentation period is complete, shake the kefir vigorously, and place a lid on the container and store the Kefir in the refrigerator”

    Hope it helps

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