Help again – Which Kefir to make?

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This topic contains 9 replies, has 5 voices, and was last updated by  approximately_me 5 years, 9 months ago.

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  • #107889

    SueinOz
    Member
    Topics: 12
    Replies: 24

    I can find instructions for making kefir so that’s not my problem but which method is right for the diet?

    Milk kefir? Made with milk. Or do I make it with coconut milk, which seems more logical.
    Water kefir? Able has some links for making water kefir but they use sugar as a base. Can we do that?

    Again I am looking at buying some in the next few days. I’d love to know what to do.

    Thanks.

    #107912

    kodaz2005
    Member
    Topics: 37
    Replies: 172

    SueinOz;46410 wrote: I can find instructions for making kefir so that’s not my problem but which method is right for the diet?

    Milk kefir? Made with milk. Or do I make it with coconut milk, which seems more logical.
    Water kefir? Able has some links for making water kefir but they use sugar as a base. Can we do that?

    Again I am looking at buying some in the next few days. I’d love to know what to do.

    Thanks.

    HI Sue,

    I think Cows milk kefir or Goats milk kefir is probably your best choice. It is the easiest to make. Several people have had a difficult time with the other products such as Coconut milk kefir. I tried several times to make it, but it never fermented properly.

    I would stay away from the dried products, such “body ecology” kit. You will get less strains of good bacteria that are produced. It’s more expensive and you have to keep buying it, unlike real grains that will grow as you feed them with milk. To make matters worse, it’s even more complicated than real grains. You have to warm the milk to a specific temperature in order for them to ferment.

    If you plan to make water kefir, you will need to buy “water kefir” grains. Otherwise if you plan to make milk kefir you will need to buy “milk kefir” grains. There’s several ways you can buy the grains online, including through Amazon. I bought mine through the Kefir lady.

    #107979

    SueinOz
    Member
    Topics: 12
    Replies: 24

    Thanks
    I will go ahead with the milk kefir. I can buy locally produced live culture from Queensland and elsewhere.
    My tummy doesn’t like milk, I get pains but no bloating, so I will see if lactose free milk works.

    Thanks again.
    Sue

    #107980

    shayfo
    Member
    Topics: 18
    Replies: 668

    The kefir grains eat the lactose, so I’m not sure making kefir with lactose-free milk would work. Cow milk kills me, but goat milk seems okay — maybe try that? Or sheep milk?

    #107981

    approximately_me
    Member
    Topics: 28
    Replies: 186

    I’ve never had luck using coconut milk either. Plus it’s quite a bit more expensive. In terms of economy, unless organic milk is cheaper where you are, I’d say water kefir is a bit more economically feasible.

    Also, a lot of people don’t realize that water kefir isn’t kefir at all. It’s proper name is tipicos and has no real relation to milk kefir. As such, they have different strains and different effects on digestion. Ideally, it be a good idea to work up to taking both regularly.

    Kombucha is another powerful probiotic drink that a lot of people don’t take advantage of. Someone just told me that kombucha is a very strong chelator as well.

    #107984

    shayfo
    Member
    Topics: 18
    Replies: 668

    I’ve had coconut milk kefir work very well, but as A_M says, it’s expensive. Also, you’ll need to refresh the grains in some sort of animal milk periodically to keep them from dying.

    A_M, I’ve posted this elsewhere in the past, but this article written by a respected mycologist dissuaded me from drinking kombucha (which I made at home for years). If you don’t want to read the entire thing, use your browser’s “find” feature to skip to the mentions of its antibiotic nature. http://www.fungi.com/blog/items/kombucha-my-adventures-with-the-blob.html

    #107991

    approximately_me
    Member
    Topics: 28
    Replies: 186

    Thanks shayfo, that’s interesting. I’ll look into this a bit more.

    I’m a bit hesitant about her use of the word antibiotic though. Because it can be useful against certain infections and possibly replace antibiotics, doesn’t make kombucha an antibiotic itself. After all, this winter I kicked a strep throat infection pretty quickly by increasing my milk kefir consumption dramatically. It can rid an infection by introducing a community of bacteria and yeast. My understanding of kombucha is that it works very similarly. Also, a kombucha scoby isn’t a mushroom. It’s a bit of a misnomer.

    #107992

    Jojilla
    Member
    Topics: 21
    Replies: 51

    Hi Sue,
    I have been trying to figure out which kefir to make myself as I am allergic to milk—though, not goat’s milk. I have access to raw, goat’s milk, and have just started making that, and I am having absolutely no negative reactions to it—in fact, I love it! I’m up to one cup in the morning and one cup in the evening!

    Let us know what you decide!

    #107996

    shayfo
    Member
    Topics: 18
    Replies: 668

    A_M, he does mention in the article that it’s not a mushroom. I’ve been doing some researching every now and then to try to find something solid to corroborate or disprove Stamets’ assertions about the antibiotic properties of kombucha, but so far, it’s been difficult to find anything that cites actual research.

    #108002

    approximately_me
    Member
    Topics: 28
    Replies: 186

    shayfo;46517 wrote: A_M, he does mention in the article that it’s not a mushroom. I’ve been doing some researching every now and then to try to find something solid to corroborate or disprove Stamets’ assertions about the antibiotic properties of kombucha, but so far, it’s been difficult to find anything that cites actual research.

    It’s so bewildering why there isn’t more research into things like this. But thanks again for the link shayfo. I’m going to try a week without kombucha and see if notice a difference.

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