Hair test interpretation + question about the Cutler counting procedure.

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This topic contains 6 replies, has 4 voices, and was last updated by  TheChosenOne 4 years, 5 months ago.

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  • #121436

    TheChosenOne
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    It’s a long time since I gave an update. This is a small one. Soon a bigger one will follow.
    Last week, I received the results of my hair test (Doctor’s Data):

    Overall, this chart seems to be good. Mercury and lead are elevated, but not out of range. Only uranium is out of range. A quick internet search tells me that this is quite normal in highly industrialized countries.

    In general, I see that most elements are low to very low, except for zinc (see later) and sulfur. The fact that sulfur is elevated is possible, because that was basically my diet (broccoli, brussels sprouts, cauliflower) until a few months ago.
    Magnesium is very low. According to them, it may be caused by the consumption of ‘junk food’, intestinal malabsorption, hypocalcemia, chemical toxicity with renal wasting, alcoholism, alkalosis, prolonged diarrhea/laxative abuse, and iatrogenic causes. Only intestinal malabsorption and diarrhea/laxative abuse make sense. Either way, it causes muscle cramps and tremor and mental depression. This basically explains the chronic muscle pain that I have and the leg cramps at night, which I both don’t seem to be able to get rid of.
    Manganese is also very low. It is caused by low dietary Mn intake (and intestinal malabsorption) and the interaction of Mn with phosphates in the gut. Manganese is an essential element that is involved in energy metabolism, and bone and cartilage (connective tissue like joints) formation. Mn is an activator of many important enzymes. This can explain the lack of certain enzymes, including: mitochondrial superoxide dismutase, arginase, and pyruvate carboxylase. Most important symptoms are: fatigue, impaired metabolism of bone and cartilage, weight loss, increased allergic sensitivities and inflammation. Severe Mn deficiency can lead to seizures.
    I read that magnesium and manganese are used interchangeably in many enzymes and metabolic functions. The fact that I’m deficient in both might be a problem.
    Chromium is low. Cr is required for the maintenance of normal glucose and cholesterol levels and potentiates insulin function. Symptoms are hypoglycemia, accelerated atherosclerogenesis (plaque formation in the arteries), elevated LDL cholesterol (the bad one), lowered HDL cholesterol (the good one), increased need for insulin and diabetes-like symptoms and impaired stress responses. The major causes of Cr deficiency is either the ingestion of highly processed foods or gastrointestinal dysfunction.
    Zinc is high. High Zn levels are acutally contraindicative. Substantially elevated hair Zn is usually a sign of Zn wasting and consequent low body zinc levels. Zn can be displaced from proteins such as intracellular metallothionein by other metals, particularly cadmium, lead, copper, and mercury, resulting in paradoxically elevated hair Zn. Elevated Zn levels usually indicate heavy metal poisoning. Zn is an essential element that is required in many very important biological processes. Symptoms are dry skin, poor immune function (specifically cellular immunity), reduced taste and smell and fatigue. Zinc deficiency can lead to impaired neurological and psychiatric functioning (like ADD). It also causes an imbalance between T helper type 1 and T helper type 2 cells and reduced NK cells activity (the anti-cancer cells). If Zn deficiency is caused by mercury, it is due to mercury induced mineral transport derangement. This results in allergies, autoimmunity and a poor immune response to pathogens like viruses, bacteria yeast and fungus (so also candida).
    Something else that was stated in the report is normal copper levels. This excludes Wilson’s disease/syndrome and copper poisoning.

    Note that I have been supplementing calcium, magnesium, molybdenum (for a short period) and iodine.

    Dunno what to do with these ratios. I found a website that explains stuff. But some information seems a bit confusing.

    A little question. The Cutler book talks about ppm. But DD uses micrograms/gram. These two are not really compatible?

    #121438

    raster
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    Well you might be the first to come back with test results like this on this site. If the test is completely accurate, I personally wouldn’t worry too much about mercury or lead which is a relief I guess.

    As far as malabsorption, it can also occur with elevated histamine levels and a variety of other factors (inflammation, pH issues, methylation problems, etc). Elevated histamine levels are a common occurrance with most candida sufferers.

    -raster

    #121440

    TheChosenOne
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    raster;59959 wrote: Well you might be the first to come back with test results like this on this site. If the test is completely accurate, I personally wouldn’t worry too much about mercury or lead which is a relief I guess.

    According to Cutler, mercury doesn’t have to show up in a hair test. Why is my zinc elevated?

    #121442

    ThomasJoel2
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    I’m not an expert in interpreting hair tests, but here’s what I could gather:

    You have 7 bars extending to the right, with the iodine bar practically in the middle. According to Cutler’s counting rules 5 bars or less to the right or left of the 50th percentile mark is indicative of deranged mineral transport, and thus mercury toxicity. Since you only have 7 you don’t meet that counting rule although your results are “unusual.” Cutler’s table on page 26 of HTI goes into this and explains how the counting rules indicate a probability, not a certainty. I’m not sure if you know all this already, but if not hopefully that’s helpful.

    Keep in mind also that there are a good amount of people out there who technically don’t meet any of the counting rules, but who still find great benefit from AC chelation. Hair tests are not completely reliable even with Cutler’s counting rules.

    Because of all this, the only real way to know whether or not mercury or other heavy metals are a problem for you is to do a trial chelation period. If you respond positively and see improvements then you can be confident you have a HM problem despite the negative hair test result.

    #121443

    ThomasJoel2
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    Someone else just posted their own hair test results to the FDC Facebook group just now which came back negative and here is what Andy had to say. This kinda goes off what I was just saying:

    “This is a very normal looking hair test. It can be a false negative and you still have mercury (or some other heavy metal) or it can mean you don’t have a heavy metal problem.”

    “Since you’ve tried chelation you have the definitive test – if you had any side effects, you have something chelatable at significant levels to cause problems.”

    “False negatives are not uncommon when people had their exposure removed some years ago and have been doing a lot to support their health.”

    #121446

    Rabelais
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    ThomasJoel2;59963 wrote: […] 5 bars or less to the right or left of the 50th percentile mark is indicative of deranged mineral transport, and thus mercury toxicity.

    Please cut all words after the “thus”.

    A deranged mineral transport may have many, many causes. It’s irresponsible to forget 99% of them and unjustly focus on just one possibility, especially if that possibility is a rather remote one.

    ThomasJoel2;59963 wrote: there are a good amount of people […] who still find great benefit from AC chelation. […] the only real way to know […] is to do a trial chelation period.

    As you can read elsewhere on this forum, chelation has negative side effects. The chelation chemicals may even directly endanger your health.

    Chelation does have its uses, and that’s why hospitals do use it – but only after making sure that the advantages outweigh the impact on your health. Using chelation “just to try” is therefore very risky business. If your health is already compromised, you’d better steer away from such experiments.

    Rabelais

    #121447

    TheChosenOne
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    ThomasJoel2;59963 wrote: Cutler’s table on page 26 of HTI goes into this and explains how the counting rules indicate a probability, not a certainty. I’m not sure if you know all this already, but if not hopefully that’s helpful.

    I’ve only read the amalgam book, because I cannot find the HTI book. I’ve ordered it from Amazon last week, but it takes ages before it will arrive.

    ThomasJoel2;59964 wrote: “False negatives are not uncommon when people had their exposure removed some years ago and have been doing a lot to support their health.”

    I’ve started the candida diet 2 years ago. Since last year I started the strict diet and started to take 100s of supplements.
    My amalgams were removed about 4 years ago (I guess government regulation, because I didn’t really ask for it).

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