flax and guar gum

Home The Candida Forum Candida Questions flax and guar gum

This topic contains 7 replies, has 7 voices, and was last updated by  candida_sucks 6 years, 11 months ago.

Viewing 8 posts - 1 through 8 (of 8 total)
  • Author
    Posts
  • #77869

    mariegirl
    Member
    Topics: 22
    Replies: 45

    I’ve been eating flax for a few weeks now and noticed that it wasn’t on the list at all. Should I be eating it? I made this great bread, and now I don’t know what to do. I’m not reacting to it, but I don’t want to feed any candida either.

    I just introduce coconut cream and also noticed that it should be introduce much later in the diet. My brand (thai kitchen) contains guar gum. Is this okay, Or should I drop the milk and try it later on? I’m on my 6th week.

    mariegirl

    #77896

    Marbro
    Member
    Topics: 19
    Replies: 252

    It’s important to remember that you can still be feeding candida an not feel a reaction. It’s something I remind myself of each time I try new foods.

    I thought flax was ok but I guess not if it’s not on the diet. maybe an expert here can explain why not. I would stop eating it for now.

    Guar gum is bad for you and should not be used in a candida diet. I can find no reference stating otherwise. I have read that diabetics sometimes use it in place of starch for a thickner but I don’t see it being good for fighting candida.

    The use of guar gum as an ingredient in non-prescription diet aids was officially banned in the early 1990s by the FDA. The guar gum would bind with liquids in the stomach and swell, causing a feeling of satisfying fullness. However, this mass of swollen guar gum would also cause dangerous intestinal and duodenal blockages. Guar gum was declared unsafe and ineffective for use as a non-prescription diet aid, although it is still used in small amounts as a food thickener and binder.

    #77917

    mariegirl
    Member
    Topics: 22
    Replies: 45

    Thanks Marbro. Maybe I should leave out flax for now. I finally found a bread that I like and it’s just out of reach. Well, I’ll freeze it for much later. And I think I’ll just leave out the coconut milk until after the diet as well. Rather be safe than sorry.

    mariegirl

    #77922

    raster
    Participant
    Topics: 104
    Replies: 6838

    In the previous allowed foods list flax was listed as a test food item. I believe able ate it throughout his treatment (I believe he needs to confirm this though). The main reason it is controversial is because it is a dried food item that contains molds. I haven’t tried it or eaten it on the diet; I say if it works for you then go for it. I would consider it to be a stage 2 item if you really want to be safe.

    Keep in mind reactions may take days/weeks/months to happen. You might not feel anything the day you eat it, but if you eat regularly for months, eventually you might get a bad reaction.

    -raster

    #77929

    M
    Member
    Topics: 72
    Replies: 253

    I’ve been using ground flaxseed meal for a while now. No reaction so far, and I feel that it’s one of the things that’s helping me go to the bathroom more regularly. Try it as a test item.

    #77931

    Javizy
    Member
    Topics: 20
    Replies: 945

    I think flax is worth keeping if you don’t get a reaction from it, too. It’s hard to find such a good source of essential fatty acids. It’s also one of the most effective natural bulking laxatives there is, and eating it regularly will help cleanse your colon. Just make sure it’s freshly ground.

    #81353

    benc
    Member
    Topics: 67
    Replies: 419

    As far as I’ve looked its impossible to find coconut milk without guar gum, does this mean don’t eat it?

    #81357

    candida_sucks
    Member
    Topics: 3
    Replies: 148

    Marbro wrote: Guar gum is bad for you and should not be used in a candida diet. I can find no reference stating otherwise. I have read that diabetics sometimes use it in place of starch for a thickner but I don’t see it being good for fighting candida.

    The use of guar gum as an ingredient in non-prescription diet aids was officially banned in the early 1990s by the FDA. The guar gum would bind with liquids in the stomach and swell, causing a feeling of satisfying fullness. However, this mass of swollen guar gum would also cause dangerous intestinal and duodenal blockages. Guar gum was declared unsafe and ineffective for use as a non-prescription diet aid, although it is still used in small amounts as a food thickener and binder.

    I don’t see why guar gum would be any more dangerous than psyllium. It’s just soluble fiber. Any type of soluble fiber will swell up as it absorbs liquid, which is why you’re supposed to take it with lots of water if you’re using it as a fiber supplement. Without the water, then the blockages you mention could occur. The FDA shows guar gum as being GRAS (generally recognized as safe):

    FDA on guar gum

    Web MD also shows guar gum as being safe if taken with enough water (click side effects tab):

    Web MD guar gum

    I did see the stuff about the ban in the 1990’s. In diet pill form, it was probably being used without taking enough water. Psyllium would be danderous, too, if taken without enough water. I use guar gum every day as a soluble fiber supplement. It helps my bowels and feeds the good bacteria in the gut. Vitamin shop sells it as a powder. Bob’s Red Mill sells it, too.

    Cheers

Viewing 8 posts - 1 through 8 (of 8 total)

The topic ‘flax and guar gum’ is closed to new replies.