Fermented vegetables?

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This topic contains 9 replies, has 6 voices, and was last updated by  monkey 7 years, 3 months ago.

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  • #72974

    catlover345
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    I’m just wondering exactly what fermented vegetables mean and why it would be better for you?

    #73017

    Able900
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    catlover345 wrote: I’m just wondering exactly what fermented vegetables mean and why it would be better for you?

    Fermented vegetables are made or fermented with lactic acid bacteria. The taste of the vegetable is changed considerably through the process. Think about the difference between cabbage and sauerkraut; sauerkraut is fermented cabbage. Fermented vegetables are just as beneficial to a Candida treatment as kefir is because they all contain beneficial bacteria which can destroy the Candida.

    Able

    #73023

    raster
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    Is this the same as pickling veggies?

    #73024

    Able900
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    raster wrote: Is this the same as pickling veggies?

    No, Raster, if I’m thinking correctly, pickling involves soaking the vegetables in vinegar, right?

    On the other hand, fermented foods contain no vinegar, yet have a sour or vinegar-like taste (think sauerkraut again). If you purchase sauerkraut in a container that has vinegar listed as an ingredient, then it isn’t true sauerkraut in that it hasn’t been fermented.

    You can actually purchase vegetable culture starter kits similar to the starter kits for kefir. They contain different strains of beneficial bacteria.

    Able

    #73055

    Javizy
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    I think a lot of traditionally made pickles are cultured. Gherkins are one example, but now they’re commercially made with vinegar. You also have the problem with things like sauerkraut being pasteurised or stored at room temperature, so there’s no bacteria left by the time you eat it. Luckily, there’s a refrigerated Polish brand in my local supermarket.

    Another reason fermented veggies are good is because of the additional enzymes they contain, which makes them easier to digest. In fact, I think the bacteria actually pre-digest them to some extent.

    #73056

    Lucylu
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    Is that right Javizy? That saurkraut in a jar in the cupboard loses it’s bacteria? Dammit, I have a jar that I was going to enjoy tonight! I’ll take a look at the Polish section for a refrigerated one.

    #73057

    Javizy
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    Check to see if it says ‘pasteurised product’ anywhere on the jar, because this procedure kills off 99% of all bacteria. If it doesn’t, there probably still won’t be much/any left for the same reason you need to keep probiotics like MegaFlora in the fridge – the heat decimates the bacteria.

    The Polish brand I get has ‘kapusta’ on the front, which is the word for cabbage in that region. I don’t think it says sauerkraut anywhere on the shelf label or anything, so keep a look out for that. Apparently all Poles have it in their fridge like Koreans with kimchi. Kefir is a staple too. I wonder what their intestinal health is like compared to countries further West in Europe. Maybe the daily probiotics just balance out all those horrible-looking sausages and patés they eat lol.

    #73059

    Lucylu
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    I know, those pates look so smooth and over processed don’t they?! I prefer a decent rustic chicken liver pate myself! I miss it…

    I wondered that about the Kefir – they must have very healthy guts! When I mentioned to a Croation friend that I’d just discovered it she looked at me like I had 2 heads! She’s drunk it all her life and gives it to her young chidren each day instead of the awful sugar filled fromage frais we give our kids here!

    I’ll have a look in Tesco for the Kapusta – they have the best section… or there are loads of individual Polish shops if I can’t find it there.

    #73104

    raster
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    Has anyone ever seen fermented veggies at the supermarket? Just curious.

    I might have to try out fermenting some veggies at home in some jars.

    -raster

    #73110

    monkey
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    I would be suspicious of the benefits of any cultured vegetables sold in supermarkets because in order to make them shelf-stable, there has to be a pasteurization process. The key point about cultured foods is that they are alive.

    A good website that sells starter cultures so that you can start making them yourself is http://www.culturesforhealth.com.
    For further reading, Sally Fallon’s “Nourishing Traditions” and Sandor Katz’s “Wild Fermentation” are both exceptional.

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