Fermented cabbage !!

Home The Candida Forum Candida Questions Fermented cabbage !!

This topic contains 13 replies, has 6 voices, and was last updated by  approximately_me 5 years, 9 months ago.

Viewing 14 posts - 1 through 14 (of 14 total)
  • Author
    Posts
  • #91364

    dvjorge
    Participant
    Topics: 283
    Replies: 1368

    Hi all,

    Fermented cabbage is rich in L. Plantarum and easy to do at home.
    L. Plantarum has been identified as one of the active LAB with strong antifungal activity.

    I strongly encourage you to drink Cabbage Rejuvelac during an anticandida program. I am thinking to make it myself and start drinking it. I feel almost normal but anything that keep fungus away is great.

    Broad and complex antifungal activity among environmental isolates of lactic acid bacteria
    Jesper Magnussona, , , Katrin Ströma, Stefan Roosa, Jörgen Sjögrenb, Johan Schnürera
    a Department of Microbiology, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, 750 07 Uppsala, Sweden
    b Department of Chemistry, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, 750 07 Uppsala, Sweden
    http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/S0378-1097(02)01207-7, How to Cite or Link Using DOI
    Permissions & Reprints
    View full text
    Abstract
    More than 1200 isolates of lactic acid bacteria isolated from different environments were screened for antifungal activity in a dual-culture agar plate assay. Approximately 10% of the isolates showed inhibitory activity and 4% showed strong activity against the indicator mould Aspergillus fumigatus. The antifungal spectra for 37 isolates with strong activity and five isolates with low or no activity were determined. Several of the strains showed strong inhibitory activity against the moulds A. fumigatus, Aspergillus nidulans,Penicillium commune and Fusarium sporotrichioides, and also against the yeast Rhodotorula mucilaginosa.Penicillium roqueforti and the yeasts Pichia anomala and Kluyveromyces marxianus were not inhibited. Several isolates showed reduced antifungal activity after storage and handling. The majority of the fungal inhibitory isolates were identified by 16S rDNA sequencing as Lactobacillus coryniformis. Lactobacillus plantarum and Pediococcus pentosaceus were also frequently identified among the active isolates. The degree of fungal inhibition was not only related to production of lactic or acetic acid. In addition, antifungal cyclic dipeptides were identified after HPLC separation and several other active fractions were found suggesting a highly complex nature of the antifungal activity.

    Lactic Acid Bacteria
    textbookofbacteriology.net/lactics_3.html
    The natural fermentation of cabbage to make sauerkraut involves L. brevis and L.plantarum in the final succession of microbe.

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CEL1QkD_TIY

    ABSTRACT
    Objectives: Candida species are among the most important and frequent opportunistic microorganisms
    causing nosocomial infection. The study aim was to assess the antimicrobial potentials of lactic acid
    bacteria (LAB) against Candida albicans.
    Methodology and results: Four lactic acid bacteria (Lactobacillus plantarum ATCC 25927, L. plantarum
    isolated from ogi, L. bulgaricus and Streptococcus thermophillus from yoghurt) and an antibiotic (-
    clotrimoxazole) were evaluated. Disc diffusion method was used by seeding blood agar plate with Candida
    albicans containing 10
    6
    cfu/ml LAB and 20µg/ml of clotrimozaxole. Zones of inhibition of L. plantarum
    (22mm), L. bulgaricus(19mm) and clotrimozaxole(21mm) were not significantly different at P< 0.05 while
    there was significant difference between clotrimoxazole and S. thermophillus.
    Conclusion and application of findings: Antimicrobial activities of lactic acid bacteria isolated from
    fermented maize “ogi” were revealed. Lactobacillus species can provide some protection against
    candidiasis. Consumption of fermented foods such as “ogi” should be encouraged in women to increase
    Lactobacillus population in the gastrointestinal tract and subsequently in the female genital organs.
    Key words: Candidiasis, lactic acid bacteria, fermented foods, Ogi, antimicrobials, women

    Jorge

    #91376

    benc
    Member
    Topics: 67
    Replies: 419

    i’m going to make some this weekend with red cabbage

    #91380

    benc
    Member
    Topics: 67
    Replies: 419

    a lot of store bought sauerkraut is pasteurised, does that process kill the benefits?

    #91386

    raster
    Participant
    Topics: 104
    Replies: 6838

    Its sorta like cabbage kefir! Very interesting!

    http://editor.nourishedmagazine.com.au/articles/cabbage-rejuvelac-recipe

    My only concern is whether my house is warm enough at 63 degrees F for it to ferment. I could maybe bring it to work though…

    -raster

    #106381

    raster
    Participant
    Topics: 104
    Replies: 6838

    BUMP!!!

    #106392

    approximately_me
    Member
    Topics: 28
    Replies: 186

    Homemade sauerkraut is super easy to make. It’s also hugely improved my digestion since i started making it a month ago.

    #106393

    approximately_me
    Member
    Topics: 28
    Replies: 186

    Making Sauerkraut
    Written by Sandor Katz
    Posted on April 27, 2012
    Sandor Ellix Katz, the creator of this site, has earned the nickname “Sandorkraut” for his love of sauerkraut. This is Sandorkaut’s easy sauerkraut recipe from his book Wild Fermentation: The Flavor, Nutrition, and Craft of Live-Culture Foods (Chelsea Green, 2003).

    Timeframe: 1-4 weeks (or more)

    Special Equipment:

    Ceramic crock or food-grade plastic bucket, one-gallon capacity or greater
    Plate that fits inside crock or bucket
    One-gallon jug filled with water (or a scrubbed and boiled rock)
    Cloth cover (like a pillowcase or towel)
    Ingredients (for 1 gallon):

    5 pounds cabbage
    3 tablespoons sea salt
    Process:

    1. Chop or grate cabbage, finely or coarsely, with or without hearts, however you like it. I love to mix green and red cabbage to end up with bright pink kraut. Place cabbage in a large bowl as you chop it.

    2. Sprinkle salt on the cabbage as you go. The salt pulls water out of the cabbage (through osmosis), and this creates the brine in which the cabbage can ferment and sour without rotting. The salt also has the effect of keeping the cabbage crunchy, by inhibiting organisms and enzymes that soften it. 3 tablespoons of salt is a rough guideline for 5 pounds of cabbage. I never measure the salt; I just shake some on after I chop up each cabbage. I use more salt in summer, less in winter.

    3. Add other vegetables. Grate carrots for a coleslaw-like kraut. Other vegetables I’ve added include onions, garlic, seaweed, greens, Brussels sprouts, small whole heads of cabbage, turnips, beets, and burdock roots. You can also add fruits (apples, whole or sliced, are classic), and herbs and spices (caraway seeds, dill seeds, celery seeds, and juniper berries are classic, but anything you like will work). Experiment.

    4. Mix ingredients together and pack into crock. Pack just a bit into the crock at a time and tamp it down hard using your fists or any (other) sturdy kitchen implement. The tamping packs the kraut tight in the crock and helps force water out of the cabbage.

    5. Cover kraut with a plate or some other lid that fits snugly inside the crock. Place a clean weight (a glass jug filled with water) on the cover. This weight is to force water out of the cabbage and then keep the cabbage submerged under the brine. Cover the whole thing with a cloth to keep dust and flies out.

    6. Press down on the weight to add pressure to the cabbage and help force water out of it. Continue doing this periodically (as often as you think of it, every few hours), until the brine rises above the cover. This can take up to about 24 hours, as the salt draws water out of the cabbage slowly. Some cabbage, particularly if it is old, simply contains less water. If the brine does not rise above the plate level by the next day, add enough salt water to bring the brine level above the plate. Add about a teaspoon of salt to a cup of water and stir until it’s completely dissolved.

    7. Leave the crock to ferment. I generally store the crock in an unobtrusive corner of the kitchen where I won’t forget about it, but where it won’t be in anybody’s way. You could also store it in a cool basement if you want a slower fermentation that will preserve for longer.

    8. Check the kraut every day or two. The volume reduces as the fermentation proceeds. Sometimes mold appears on the surface. Many books refer to this mold as “scum,” but I prefer to think of it as a bloom. Skim what you can off of the surface; it will break up and you will probably not be able to remove all of it. Don’t worry about this. It’s just a surface phenomenon, a result of contact with the air. The kraut itself is under the anaerobic protection of the brine. Rinse off the plate and the weight. Taste the kraut. Generally it starts to be tangy after a few days, and the taste gets stronger as time passes. In the cool temperatures of a cellar in winter, kraut can keep improving for months and months. In the summer or in a heated room, its life cycle is more rapid. Eventually it becomes soft and the flavor turns less pleasant.

    9. Enjoy. I generally scoop out a bowl- or jarful at a time and keep it in the fridge. I start when the kraut is young and enjoy its evolving flavor over the course of a few weeks. Try the sauerkraut juice that will be left in the bowl after the kraut is eaten. Sauerkraut juice is a rare delicacy and unparalleled digestive tonic. Each time you scoop some kraut out of the crock, you have to repack it carefully. Make sure the kraut is packed tight in the crock, the surface is level, and the cover and weight are clean. Sometimes brine evaporates, so if the kraut is not submerged below brine just add salted water as necessary. Some people preserve kraut by canning and heat-processing it. This can be done; but so much of the power of sauerkraut is its aliveness that I wonder: Why kill it?

    10. Develop a rhythm. I try to start a new batch before the previous batch runs out. I remove the remaining kraut from the crock, repack it with fresh salted cabbage, then pour the old kraut and its juices over the new kraut. This gives the new batch a boost with an active culture starter.

    http://www.wildfermentation.com/making-sauerkraut-2/

    #106426

    Cheesey
    Member
    Topics: 37
    Replies: 245

    What would be the impact of adding sugary fruit or veg as that guide suggests? Do the bacteria reduce the amount of sugar as with kefir, or should we avoid adding, for instance, carrots?

    #106429

    raster
    Participant
    Topics: 104
    Replies: 6838

    The cabbage probiotic water shouldn’t contain very much sugar…

    -raster

    #106432

    nikki
    Member
    Topics: 44
    Replies: 136

    jorge,

    what is your status?
    are you completely cured?

    just checking, as you were doing enemas etc, and following a diffnt approach…. just wanted to know if anything worked.

    #106433

    Cheesey
    Member
    Topics: 37
    Replies: 245

    raster;44949 wrote: The cabbage probiotic water shouldn’t contain very much sugar…

    -raster

    Is that I shouldn’t add any carrot, or it won’t contain much sugar after fermentation?

    #106441

    raster
    Participant
    Topics: 104
    Replies: 6838

    I am not a specialist about fermented foods but I would imagine that the cabbage water contains less sugar than fermented carrots.

    -raster

    #106464

    approximately_me
    Member
    Topics: 28
    Replies: 186

    I would hesitate to add vegetables that aren’t on the diet. Because it takes a lot of time for the bacteria to break down solid food (as opposed to kefir breaking down sugar or lactose in a liquid) and because there are so many variables (how thick the vegetables are chopped, the amount of salt, the temperature etc.), there’s way to know how much sugar would be in remaining–and I can’t see there not being any remaining.

    You can, however, ferment just about any vegetable–though some don’t keep as long–so you do have lots of options.

    I personally recommend fermenting red or purple cabbage. After two weeks it turns an incredible bright pink. Serve it to your friends even! It looks incredible on a plate!

    #106465

    approximately_me
    Member
    Topics: 28
    Replies: 186

    Sandor Katz, the guy who wrote the bit I posted above, also has two really great books about fermenting foods, “The Art of Fermentation” and “Wild Fermentation.” I posted about them a few weeks ago, but no one seemed to bite [sic].

Viewing 14 posts - 1 through 14 (of 14 total)

The topic ‘Fermented cabbage !!’ is closed to new replies.