Fact & Theory

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This topic contains 6 replies, has 5 voices, and was last updated by  Able900 7 years, 2 months ago.

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  • #70280

    Able900
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    It’s curious how some people with a Candida infestation experience strong reactions from milk and dairy products containing lactose, yet others seem to have little to no problems with it.

    Scientific Fact

    Without digestive enzymes, metabolic reactions cannot take place. One example which most of us have heard of is lactose intolerance.
    Lactose is a disaccharide found in milk, otherwise known as “milk sugar.” Lactose is made of glucose and galactose, which are both easily digestible monosaccharides. Since lactose is a disaccharide, an enzyme called lactase is required to break down the disaccharide into two monosaccharides called glucose and galactose. If a person does not produce enough of the lactase enzyme, that person is said to be lactose intolerant. If this person consumes dairy products, the lactose cannot be broken down and absorbed by the intestines. When the lactose passes into the large intestine, it is fermented by bacteria, which produces by products such as lactic acid, carbon dioxide, hydrogen, and methane. Such by-products combined with water result in abdominal pain, bloating, gas, and diarrhea.

    The “Theory” Part

    If you are lactose intolerant, this means that the enzyme lactase is not found naturally in your body, therefore the lactose cannot be broken down into glucose and galactose; if the lactose is not broken down into glucose and galactose then Candida albicans obviously cannot feed on it.

    On the other hand…

    If you are not lactose intolerant, or if you tolerate dairy products without an upset stomach, this means that you have the enzyme lactase in your body which breaks down the lactose into glucose and galactose therefore making it possible for the Candida albicans to feed on the glucose.
    If kefir and yogurt are not completely fermented, small amounts of the lactose are left in the end product, then it’s logical that the Candida will be able to feed on the glucose once the lactose is broken down by the enzyme.

    Lactate tolerant = Candida reaction from dairy or lactose.
    Lactate intolerant = No Candida reaction from dairy or lactose.

    No, I can’t prove this – it’s just a theory which at least seems to make sense. Opinions welcomed.

    Able

    #70282

    dvjorge
    Participant
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    It might be totally possible. Lab research has used lactose to test yeast’s growth factor and fermentation ” in vitro “. In “vivo” the things change. As you noticed, lactose is broken down by an enzyme converting part of it in glucose that feed the fungus.
    It is very interesting what you posted because most intestinal infections cause villi damage. The fungal form of candida could be even more implicated in villi damage since its similarity with gluten.
    Anyway, the point is the lactase enzyme is located in the brush border called microvilli that is the first affected part when the villi is destroyed by a pathogenic infection or an autoimmune attack.
    I believe people with an active fungal overgrowth have partial villi damage (some more severe than others) and are lactose intolerant. Later on, when the infection be reduced, the villi begin to regrowth, and those people tolerate lactose again. But, this is the dangerous point because the remaining fungus may use glucose to regrowth.
    Your post made me to think about it. I am speculating it but possible in my view.
    Jorge.

    #70284

    Able900
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    dvjorge wrote: I believe people with an active fungal overgrowth have partial villi damage (some more severe than others) and are lactose intolerant. Later on, when the infection be reduced, the villi begin to regrowth, and those people tolerate lactose again.

    Thanks for your input, Jorge. Your theory above seems to fit well.

    Able

    #70305

    kirstyk4
    Member
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    Sounds like a catch 22 situation!

    If you are allergic, then you will react to it but thankfully the candida is less likely to feed on it. If you are not allergic, you won’t have a reaction due to allergy but it could be a reaction because the candida can feed on it.

    #70326

    raster
    Participant
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    Question: Are there folks out there that are allergic to greek yogurt or kefir?

    -Raster

    #70331

    Javizy
    Member
    Topics: 20
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    Seems likely since it still contains a significant amount of lactose. It’s possible to actually buy lactase enzymes as a supplement though. I wonder if that would be a good idea or not. Digesting it means possibly feeding candida, and not digesting it means digestive problems that will probably benefit candida even more.

    #70341

    Able900
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    Javizy wrote: Seems likely since it still contains a significant amount of lactose. It’s possible to actually buy lactase enzymes as a supplement though. I wonder if that would be a good idea or not. Digesting it means possibly feeding candida, and not digesting it means digestive problems that will probably benefit candida even more.

    Lactaid is the brand name of the supplement you’re speaking of; this would be the same as having the lactase already in your body since Lactaid contains the enzyme lactase. As you stated, this would break down lactose and theoretically allow the Candida to feed on the released glucose.

    Able

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