Excretion of mercury: The role of Gut Flora

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  • #119289

    Danny33
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    Topics: 25
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    My first thought was mercury toxicity was mainly for those with amalgams.
    But the more literature I come across regarding our microfloras interactions with metal compounds, the more I see dysbiosis and the rate of excretion as a determining factor.

    From what I can tell, those with severe dysbiosis (crippled gut flora) should avoid high-mercury seafood if not seafood altogether until their flora is recovered. There are of course many ways one can become exposed to mercury (and other toxic metals), check out the below.

    Tissue content of mercury in rats given methylmercuric chloride orally: influence of intestinal flora.

    Abstract
    The effect of intestinal flora on the absorption and dispositon of mercury in tissues was investigated using conventional rats, and rats treated with antibiotics to eliminate their gut flora. Antibiotic-treated rats given [203Hg]-labeled methylmercuric chloride orally had significantly more mercury in their tissues, especially in kidney, brain, lung, blood, and skeletal muscle, and also excreted less mercury in the feces than conventional rats. Furthermore, in the kidneys of the antibiotic-treated rats, the proportion of mercury present as organic mercury was greater than in the kidneys of the conventional rats. The results suppport the hypothesis that the metabolism of methylmercuric chloride by the gut flora reduces the tissue content of mercury. When rats were administered 10 mg methylmercuric chloride/kg . day for 6 days, four of five of those given antibiotics developed neurological symptoms of toxicity, whereas only one of five conventional rats given methylmercuric chloride was affected.

    rats given methylmercuric chloride orally: influence of intestinal flora

    Effects of diet on mercury metabolism and excretion in mice given methylmercury: role of gut flora.
    Abstract
    Mice fed either (1) a pelleted rodent diet, (2) evaporated milk, or (3) a synthetic diet (high protein, low fat) exhibited different rates of whole body mercury elimination and fecal mercury excretion after exposure (per os) to methylmercuric chloride. The percentage of the total mercury body burden present as mercuric mercury was highest (35.3%) in mice fed the synthetic diet (which had the highest rate of mercury elimination) and lowest (6.6%) in the animals having the lowest mercury elimination rate (milk-fed mice). Mice fed the synthetic diet had lower mercury concentrations and had a higher proportion of mercuric mercury in their tissues than the mice from the other dietary groups. Treatment of the mice with antibiotics throughout the experimental period to suppress the gut flora reduced fecal mercury excretion and the dietary differences in whole body retention of mercury. Tissue mercury concentrations and proportion of organic mercury in feces, cecal contents, liver, and kidneys were increased by antibiotic treatment of mice fed the pelleted or synthetic diets. These results are consistent with the theory that demethylation of methylmercury by intestinal microflora is a major factor determining the excretion rate of mercury.

    mercury metabolism and excretion in mice given methylmercury: role of gut flora

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    Role of the Gut Flora in Toxicity and Cancer

    -D

    #120335

    Rabelais
    Blocked
    Topics: 3
    Replies: 268


    Yes, gut flora is a very hot topic in medical research, especially in the last few years. This topic really seems to be gaining traction in the medical world!

    You are also right that, when you choose to focus on mercury, environmental factors are by far the largest contributors. That’s mainly fish, for the majority of the population. Local pollution may be a factor too, but only for a minority of us.

    Amalgam fillings hardly contribute at all. There’s a large scare going on about those, but that’s probably only because it is so very easy to pinpoint the culprit, and of course because it’s an easy way to earn some money if you help feed the scare.

    But back to the topic: gut flora is very, very important. It governs our health, our skin (including the prevention of rashes), and even our feelings and our behaviour. Much research is going on, so we can expect lot of new discoveries in the very near future.

    Rabelais

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