enzymes?

This topic contains 3 replies, has 3 voices, and was last updated by  Steadam2011 7 years, 9 months ago.

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  • #64424

    myucateco
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    Topics: 4
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    My husband and i have both been on antibiotics in the last six months and recently we’ve realized candida is probably a problem for us. We’re getting ready to do the cleanse according to this website and I’m getting ready to buy a bunch of stuff from iherb.com including the bentonite clay and some antifungals. There’s one product called “Candex” that got rave reviews and I’m thinking of getting it but don’t know how it fits into the cleanse. I think its some kind of enzyme supplement. Has anyone ever heard of it or used it? If so, at what point during the cleanse should you take it?

    #64426

    Able900
    Spectator
    Topics: 92
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    Hello, and welcome to the forum.

    Candex is a popular product often named for the treatment of Candida, which is just one more reason why so many Candida sufferers end up having their infestation for 5, 10, and even 15 years or longer. Candex contains enzymes, two of which are Cellulase and Hemicellulase. Candida albicans produce a cell wall which surrounds and protects them. This wall is constructed, among other compounds, of proteins and enzymes, and one of the enzymes is Cellulase. If anyone figures out how adding more Cellulase is supposed to benefit the Candida treatment, please let us know.

    In addition to the above, in Candex, the purpose of both Cellulase and Hemicellulase is to break down the enzymes in the vegetables we eat. When either of these two enzymes breaks down and combines with the vegetable enzymes, the result is a sugar that’s produced during the process which feed the Candida.

    You can also see how further damage is done when you consider that the flora in the intestines normally ferments the fiber which then produces anti-fungal acids that destroy Candida. Cellulase and Hemicellulase will digest the beneficial fiber in vegetables that would normally feed the beneficial flora in the system. This process would literally starve the flora which in turn encourages the fungal overgrowth in the intestines.

    As far as taking enzymes in general is concerned, you don’t really need to start the enzymes until you’re completely finished with the cleanse and start eating again. For your enzyme source you can purchase a product by the name of “Digestive Grape Bitters.”

    When these bitter tasting herbs come into contact with the bitter receptors on the back of the tongue, the bitter receptors are stimulated. This in turn stimulates the vagus nerve, which increases levels of stomach acid, bile and pancreatic enzymes which aid the process of digestion.

    Since the whole principle of the bitters is to stimulate the bitter receptors and thus the vagus nerve, you only need to taste the bitterness of the herbs. So just ignore the teaspoon full or dropper full of bitters that’s recommended on the bottle and use about half a dropper of the bitters before, during or after meals.

    Another problem with taking complete enzymes instead of allowing the body to make its own is that when you do this, the body will eventually shut down the production of enzymes, you will then be dependent on unnatural sources of enzymes in order to digest your food.

    Grape Bitters also have a cleansing effect on the liver, so it is important to drink plenty of water throughout the day to prevent a strong detox reaction.

    Able

    #64454

    myucateco
    Member
    Topics: 4
    Replies: 6

    Wow. Good to know. Thanks

    #64480

    Steadam2011
    Member
    Topics: 0
    Replies: 13

    When I first learned about rennet, I got really worried about “enzymes” thinking I was going to have to give up cheese completely. I looked all over for information and couldn’t find it, so I finally wrote an e-mail to someone at the National Dairy Association or whatever it’s called. Now it occurred to me she could have been less than honest, but the answer I got was that rennet is only in exotic cheeses and everyday cheeses should be fine.

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