Eat your Brussel Sprouts

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This topic contains 10 replies, has 9 voices, and was last updated by  lucidity 5 years, 11 months ago.

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  • #91056

    Able900
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    Phytoalexins are various varieties of toxins which are produced naturally in and by plants. These specific toxins are not toxic to human beings, but are very toxic to organisms and pathogens which attempt to attack plants. One particular phytoalexin is known as brussalexin, and it has proven to be one of the most powerful antifungal agents in the plant kingdom. It may puncture the cell wall of the fungus, delay maturity, disrupt metabolism, and it can prevent reproduction of fungi. What I’m saying is, it can successfully inactivate Candida albicans cells, and it can do this quicker than other antifungals.

    A high concentration of brussalexin is found in Brussels sprouts. Add these tiny, cabbage-like vegetables to your every day diet as a strong and natural antifungal. Watch for possible strong die-off symptoms afterwards, especially if this vegetable is new to your diet.

    Please let the other members know if these vegetables help you in any way or if you experience die-off symptoms after eating them.

    Able

    #91236

    jameskep
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    Interesting on the brussel sprouts. That would be great if eating brussel sprouts could have those effects on candida long-term. Did you have any particular links to this information?
    I found some info when I googled brussalexin and candida.

    #91240

    Able900
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    jameskep;29630 wrote: Interesting on the brussel sprouts. That would be great if eating brussel sprouts could have those effects on candida long-term. Did you have any particular links to this information? I found some info when I googled brussalexin and candida.

    Hello, James.

    I was actually doing some research on different types of phytoalexins when I discovered this very strong one that’s highly concentrated in Brussels sprouts (brussalexin).

    And I think you’re right about Brussels sprouts being a good maintenance food once you’ve finished with the treatment and diet. Candida albicans are probably unable to adapt to phytoalexins, otherwise, why would they be used by nature to protect the plants?

    Thanks, Able

    #92526

    oyukisin
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    Do you guys have any brussel sprouts recipes? i have plenty on my mom’s fridge, fresh not frozen, but i don’t like them very much, i’m willing to eat them but i dont want to have it just steamed

    #92535

    SRQ
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    oyukisin;30920 wrote: Do you guys have any brussel sprouts recipes?

    I’m fortunate in that I like brussel sprouts, so I just boil them and put some coconut oil or olive oil and sea salt on them. I did just hear about chopping them and sauteeing them in olive oil, although I can’t imagine that would taste much different — just a different presentation.

    #92537

    kodaz2005
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    I really don’t think they taste that much different from other green veges. I usually cook them in coconut oil or olive oil and think the taste good that way. Lately I have been putting them in my morning vegetable Vitamix smoothie. Of course this doesn’t taste so great, but I’m very happy to read brussel sprouts are so good for us. Thanks for the tip Able!

    Also, Trader Joe’s now sell them on a large stalk fresh and unremoved. I have buying them this way. I prefer this much better than seeing them already in plastic bags.

    #92554

    Emsmith
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    yay for brussel sprouts, i like to saute w/CO, salt, and apple cider vinegar!!

    #100854

    meteordude
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    Roasting is a particularly tasty way to prepare them:

    http://www.foodnetwork.com/recipes/ina-garten/roasted-brussels-sprouts-recipe2/index.html

    I cut mine in half or in thirds before seasoning and roasting–I like the texture better this way. Tasty!

    #100855

    Cheesey
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    Topics: 37
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    I get die-off from eating a load of brussels sprouts. I make a wicked soup with a tonne of brussels sprouts, jalapenos, onion and spirulina before adding a load of raw garlic after its been simmering a while. I also add in a load of other green leafy veg like spinach and kale, as well as brocolli and just about anything else green and organic. I blend that bad-boy and viola!, you have yourself a proteinous, fibrous and antifungal snack.

    #100858

    lucidity
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    This morning I had a folded omelette with brussel sprouts, sliced and lightly fried on a coconut oil together with some onion, salted and peppered. Simple and tasty!
    I haven’t had a clue they are that good on this diet.

    #100859

    lucidity
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    Cheesey;39358 wrote: I get die-off from eating a load of brussels sprouts. I make a wicked soup with a tonne of brussels sprouts, jalapenos, onion and spirulina before adding a load of raw garlic after its been simmering a while.

    By the way, I’ve read that Spirulina looses its healthy qualities when heated. Anyone knows how is it in real?

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