Do good probiotics still colonize if you are not on an anti-candida diet?

Home The Candida Forum Candida Questions Do good probiotics still colonize if you are not on an anti-candida diet?

This topic contains 6 replies, has 5 voices, and was last updated by  Able900 6 years, 9 months ago.

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  • #84740

    1000557
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    #84742

    Javizy
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    They don’t colonise anyone. They “assist” your indigenous gut flora, so I guess taking them would be better than not if you’re eating crap.

    If you wanted to take a “break”, you should’ve just added rice, sweet potatoes, meat, fish, dairy, reasonable amounts of fruit, 85% cocoa chocolate etc. These foods still contribute to health, even if they aren’t anti-candida. Western foods are just an edible form of disease.

    #84744

    princeofsin
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    It really depends on what your diet is.

    #84782

    dvjorge
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    Listen to Javizy. There isn’t any proof that pharmaceutical probiotics can colonize the gut permanently. They are transient organism.
    Jorge.

    #84794

    Able900
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    A percentage of beneficial bacteria from oral probiotics do colonize in the intestines. The fact that it’s an unknown percentage which depends on other factors is why we suggest such high amounts of CFUs to be taken throughout the treatment.

    The research:

    A study was conducted on human subjects to test the colonization ability of oral probiotics containing strains of lactobacillus given as probiotic supplements to a group of volunteers; the volunteers were given a total of two doses a day for 17 days at which point the lactobacillus probiotic was stopped. The volunteers then went through an 18-day washout period in an attempt to clear the intestines completely of the beneficial bacteria. During this time, feces of the volunteers were tested for strains of the bacteria. The samples were taken at days 0 and 18 during the oral dose period as well as during and following the washout period; there were a total of 12 volunteers. The highest number of volunteers who continued to host the specific lactobacillus bacteria strains was 10 out of 12, and the lowest number hosting the same species of lactobacillus was 7 out of 12 samples.

    I don’t have the details concerning how the point was completely proven by the study, because I don’t have access to the full study but only the published report; however, according to the report, the experiment revealed that “beneficial bacteria of the lactobacillus species obtained by the human beings via the oral administration were capable of colonization in the human intestines.”

    This was reported in the Applied and Environmental Microbiology journal in April 2010 as well as the Therapeutic Advances in Gastroenterology journal in May 2011.

    Able

    #84798

    Javizy
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    Didn’t someone post a study before showing a gradual decline over something like 3-months? I can’t find anything useful on PubMed. 18-days seems a bit early to stop though. I don’t believe it’s impossible. There’s ongoing research about colonisation, like gene clusters involved in creating pili, which allow bacteria to latch onto the gut wall.

    I don’t think probiotics can act as a replacement though, which is why people shouldn’t stress out about colonisation as long as they keep taking them. Lactobacillus and bifidobacterium aren’t even in the top 80 species in the gut. Surely their benefit is in what they can do to change gut ecology, rather than whether they’ll be with you for the rest of your life. Dr. Ayes made a good post on restoration: Dr Oz on Gut Flora.

    #84804

    Able900
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    Javizy wrote: Surely their benefit is in what they can do to change gut ecology, rather than whether they’ll be with you for the rest of your life.

    Couldn’t agree more, Javizy.

    The question of whether or not they colonize is irrelevant with the Candida infestation. The point is that a Candida overgrowth is basically impossible to cure without changing the environment of the intestines, and high amounts of probiotics, kefir, and prebiotics can do this.

    I believe that even a completely healthy human often needs to obtain supplements of probiotics/kefir throughout his or her life.

    Able

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